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Bebop Spoken There

Ethan Iverson: "I asked Bertha [Hope] if she ever used the word "contrafact" to describe the process of writing new tunes over old changes, and she replied, "Of course not. The only people who used that word went to a university to learn about jazz."" - (Jazz Times March 2020).

Archive.

The Things They Say!

Hudson Music: Lance's "Bebop Spoken Here" is one of the heaviest and most influential jazz blogs in the UK.

Rupert Burley (Dynamic Agency): "BSH just goes from strength to strength".

COFID- 19

In the current climate we are doing our best to keep everyone up to date. All gigs, as we all know, are off.

However, good old YouTube has plenty to offer both old and new to help us survive whilst housebound. Plus now is a good time to stock up on your CDs.

Also, keep an eye out for live streaming sessions.

Alternatively, you could do as they do in Italy and sing from your balcony.

Today

As we all know there are no live gigs taking place in the immediate future. However, any links to jazz streaming that are deemed suitable - i.e. with a professional approach - will be considered for posting.

Thursday, April 16, 2009

Maine Street Jazzmen @ Rosie Malone's South Shields.

Herbie Hudson (tmb/hca/vcl), Derek Fleck (clt), Malcolm Armstrong (pno), Alan Rudd (bs), Ian Forbes (dms), Olive Rudd (vcl).
Well, now I know why Ian Forbes didn't hang around at the Chilli - he obviously wanted to have a good night's sleep ahead of today's demanding session at Rosie Malone's - not.
Like the Northumberland Tennis Club, this too is a new jazz venue albeit they are poles apart and I don't mean in distance. Having said that, I did notice a couple of characters hanging around outside who looked as though they may have been involved with the rackets. Closer inspection revealed them to be Traffic Wardens. They were rubbing their hands with glee at a Transit parked on a double yellow.
Back to the music. The Mainestreeters proved one thing - you don't need a trumpet to play traditional (ish) jazz. The two man frontline alternated melody and soloed with no lack of vigour.
Herbie, frequently favouring a plunger mute, and Derek, facile and inventive.
Herbie also had the 'Hohner 270' in action; his wailing on "See See Rider" could have come straight from an oldtime Chicago bluesman.
Behind the horns, Malcolm Armstrong played his own brand of Stride and Barrelhouse, Ian proved that his early night was worth it whilst Alan Rudd showed that there is more than one "Bass Ace" on the scene.
Olive Rudd's vocals kept things lively scoring Dix Point with "I Double Dare You", "Smiling (When You're,)" and "All of Me" among others.
An enjoyable afternoon that would have been enhanced by a few more jazzers in the audience; after all, it's only a ferryboat ride from the Porthole.
Lance.

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