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Bebop Spoken There

Jackie Paris: "A singer's got to be able to tell a story. Frank Sinatra and Nat Cole are best at that; Mel Tormé too. I like to take a lyric that means something and sing it right to the person it was meant for." - (DownBeat October 11, 1962).

Archive

Daily: July 6 - October 27

Precarity John Akomfrah’s film (2017, 46 mins) about Buddy Bolden - Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art, Gateshead Quays, South Shore Road, Gateshead NE8 3BA. Tel: 0191 478 1810. Screenings at intervals during the day. Part of Akomfrah's exhibition Ballasts of Memory. Exhibition (daily) July 6 - October 27. 10:00am-6:00pm. Free.

Today Monday September 16

Afternoon

Jazz

Precarity John Akomfrah’s film (2017, 46 mins) about Buddy Bolden (see above).

Jazz in the Afternoon - Cullercoats Crescent Club, 1 Hudleston, Cullercoats NE30 4QS. Tel: 0191 253 0242. 1:00pm. Free admission.

Evening

?????

To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Tuesday, December 20, 2011

Stan Tracey Quartet @ The Sage. Dec.19.

Stan Tracey (piano), Simon Allen (alto & tenor saxophones), Andy Cleyndert (double bass) & Clark Tracey (drums) + Ben Tracey (narration)
Reviewing Sunday's storming session at the Bridge Hotel, Bebop Spoken Here's Main Man - LL - suggested that Stan Tracey would have to play like he's never played before at The Sage the following night to win the accolade of 'Gig of the Year'. LL said all bets were off. Well, he should have put his money on Stan the Man. This was gig of the year!
A good turn-out in Hall Two greeted the Great Man and his Merry Men. Tracey introduced the band and in so doing said he would leave the stage temporarily during the first number not because of his bladder rather his memory - he had left his sheet music back stage! The first tune - Triple Celebration - most recently recorded on the apposite CD Senior Moment was but one of many gems mined from the Tracey back catalogue during the first set. Rocky Mount followed, then Duffy's Circus. The quartet's standard of musicianship could not be bettered. The tunes swung mightily, Simon Allen played great tenor then even better alto. Hearing Andy Cleyndert again served as a reminder of just how good a player he is.
Clark Tracey and Cleyndert have been the rhythm section for years and years and it showed; smiles, a nod of approval, the appreciation mutual. Tracey Snr played more piano on this gig than in a long time. He was in Monk mode, right foot tapping out the rhythm at a rate of knots. What a first set!
Stan's grandson Ben Tracey joined the quartet for the second set as narrator of Dylan Thomas' A Child's Christmas. This jazz suite, the first music Tracey had written in years, recalled Under Milk Wood. Comparisons were inevitable and perhaps against expectation any such comparisons were most favourable. Ben Tracey, at twenty two years of age, is a star in the making. He cut a figure right out of PG Wodehouse or perhaps that of a young Stephen Fry. One could imagine him as an intern working under the tutelage of Ian Hislop in the office of Private Eye. His delivery of Thomas' words was simply immaculate. Words and music integrated wonderfully; Allen opted to play alto throughout the piece, Cleyndert laid down one of the great solos of all time (not for the first time) and Tracey Jnr (that's drummer Clark) played like he knows he's good (and he is).
The year has brought us many fantastic gigs here in the north east. Stan Tracey at The Sage topped the lot. Stan Tracey celebrates his birthday next week - Friday 30th - in concert in Umbria, Italy. How good is that?
Russell 

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Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

Submissions for review

Whilst we appreciate the many emails, texts, messages and other communications we receive requesting album/gig reviews on BSH, regrettably, we are unable to reply to all of them other than those we are able to answer with a positive response.
Similarly, CDs received by post will only be considered if accompanied by sufficient background material.
Finally, bear in mind that this is a jazz-based site when submitting your album.
Lance