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Bebop Spoken There

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12,393 (and counting) posts since we started blogging 12 years ago. 112 of them this year alone and, so far, 112 this month (Jan. 23).

Tuesday, March 25, 2008

JAZZ GALLERY

Picasa Web Albums - Lance
(Updated version)

31 comments :

Lance said...

These are some jazz photos I've taken over the years - mainly in the 1980s although I'm now adding more recent ones taken this year. My preference is for black and white as it seems to capture the essence of jazz more so than colour does. Having said that, you can't beat colour in an outdoor setting.
Any one who wants to have their say on the photos or on jazz in general please do so.

25 November 2007 21:45

Lance said...

Monday nights these days are spent at the Side Café down on Newcastle Quayside. The room is small but the atmosphere big and the music modern and generally superb.
25 March 2008 08:27

Lance said...

Couldn't get Becky's version of 'You're a Lucky Guy' out of my mind. I've been singing it all day. Listened to 'Pops' version also Ruby Braff/George Barnes. Ruby does a later version on Youtube. I'd like to here the versions by Billie and Maxine (Sullivan).
Relaxation with Bill Evans' trio at Village Vanguard. Okay but he's not my type of piano player - too introvert!

27 March 2008 22:04

Lance said...

A couple of guys have recently told me about a Roland Kirk tape that once was circulating locally. Recorded surreptitiously at a Newcastle Jazz Festival concert back in the 1970s, because of its elusiveness, it has now taken on a significance similar to that of the legendary Buddy Bolden cylinder. Does anyone know of its continued existance?

30 March 2008 20:35

Lance said...

It would be unfair of me to comment on tonight's session at the Side. The audience seemed to approve so who am I to say they are wrong?

31 March 2008 22:14

Lance said...

Listening to Coltrane's 'Giant Steps' and other tracks from 'The Atlantic Years' makes me realise just how awesome a musician he was. I remember seeing him at the City Hall in the 1960s and being totally confused. Maybe in 40 years time last night's music might seem as normal as Trane's does now!
Maybe.

Anonymous said...

Nice one Lance. I don't get to see many live shows now but how about a get-to-gether on some Monday Night. Although my leaning is with the traditional jazz sounds, what the Hell, I'll give it a go.

George

Lance said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Lance said...

Hi George,
How's Mrs Anonymous these days? Love to meet up one Monday. April 21 would be up your alley; Zoë Gilby; a fine interpreter of the Great American Songbook (see link to Zoë's Place for a taster.)

02 April 2008 12:19

Lance said...

Tonight I 'Took it to the Bridge' or rather the Chillingham Arms where my old buddies Dave Weisser and Ian Trewella hold court. Excellent session with a few sitters in to add to the mix.

Anonymous said...

Loved the photos. Lots of memories from Corner House.

Lance said...

Wandered into my local charity shop to check out CDs; you never know...
Today was a big one. Dakota Staton, Morgana King, Anita O'Day, vintage Joe Venuti 99p each. There was also a Carol Kidd and an Erroll Garner but I already had those.
Dakota singing 'You've Changed' does it for me.

Lance said...

I shouldn't be allowed inside record stores! Today I noticed HMV were having a sale so, as it was snowing, I sought shelter inside. Horace Silver; 'Songs for My Father'. The legendary Blue Note was going for £4.
Well worth it. A classic album.

Lance said...

BBC Big Band playing Bob Florence's arrangement of 'Chicago' caught my ear today. Same arrangement they played at Sunderland last month.
Knockout!

Lance said...

A barnstormer of a night at the Side Café. Splinter, a 'splinter group' from the Voice of the North Jazz Orch blew an impressive couple of sets and the room was deservedly SRO.
For the record: Graham Hardy, Noel Dennis (tpt), Chris Hibbard (tmb), Graham Wilson (ten), Paul Edis (pno), Jamie McRedie (gtr), Andy Champion (bs), Adrian Tilbrook (dms) John Warren (leader & arranger).

Lance said...

Anita O'Day singing "I'm With You". This is a rather wonderful tune written, I believe, by Bobby Troup. Why hasn't it been picked up by anyone other than the composer and Miss O'Day whose 1956 recording is superb.
Anita O'Day, Art Pepper and Charlie Parker, to mention but three of many, produced some wonderful music. Was this because of, or despite their, addictions?

Lance said...

Cannonball Adderley's 'Something Else' is, pardon the pun, something else. Miles on trumpet, Hank Jones piano, Sam Jones bass and Art Blakey drums are the others on the date which just happens to be 9 March 1958 which just happens to be my birthday (not 1958).

Lance said...

Just been on the Hebburn website www.hebburn.org where there is a thread going as to who the 'World's Greatest Guitarist is or was.' In an amazingly long thread the only jazzers mentioned were Charlie Christian and Django Reinhardt and probably the most mentioned guitarist was good old Bert Weedon!
This may sound ludicrous to us guys brought up on Wes Montgomery and George Benson but in fairness to the much maligned Bert there weren't many gigs he couldn't handle.

Lance said...

Listening to Buddy Greco singing 'They Didn't Believe Me' it occurred to me that the Jerome Kern song, written in 1914, is possibly the oldest standard in the Great American Songbook. I'm open to contradiction on this one.

Lance said...

Every so often a song title comes along that catches my fancy. Such a one is "Lady, You're Husband Is Cheating On Us." It's on the Dakota Staton CD mentioned a few days ago and composer credits go to one D.Lasalle

Lance said...

Bebop wasn't spoken here. I'm talking about the two piano gig at the Saville Exchange, North Shields. Not that that diminished the performance of Keith Nichols and Martin Litton. They gave a masterclass in stride, ragtime and boogie woogie piano that led to a standing ovation. Bass and drums would have been superfluous with these two-fisted players.
A little gem.

Lance said...

Back in the 1960s, Georgie Fame was always jazzier than his contemporaries. I don't think the Beatles ever played a jazz riff in their life whereas just about everything Georgie Fame did was drenched in jazz and blues.
I'm pleased to say he hasn't changed and is, if anything, jazzier than ever. At Durham's Gala Theatre, accompanied by sons James (dms) and Tristram (gtr) he had a full house shouting for more. Songs were linked with amusing anectdotes and his piano playing carried on in the tradition of last night's Nichols/Litton gig at North Shields. The voice may not be as smooth as it once was but when he boots that Hammond B3 the joint rocks.
All in all a good night.

Lance said...

I first heard Tina May on a CD entitled 'I'll Take Romance'. With Nikki Iles on piano and some fine tenor from Scott Hamilton (They steered clear of 'UMMG') it is a CD I have played over and over again. Waxing eloquent over the lady to my good friend Jim Mcdowell I was a little surprized at his failure to nod his head in acquiescence; I wondered if he was suffering from a stiff neck. Today however, all was revealed and his reticence understood after listening to another CD by our Tina. 'A Change of Sky' has the same Ms Iles on piano but unfortunately no Scott Hamilton; nor anyone else for that matter. Lieder may be an admirable form of song when performed by a Bavarian contralto and accompanied by a second generation product of the Hitler Youth Movement (cultural division);it was pretty damn good when Ella Fitzgerald and Ellis Larkins liederised Gershwin back in the 1950s. Tina isn't Ella , Nikki isn't Ellis and none of the songs are by Gershwin so, despite the presence of a few standards that have been done better elsewhere, this is definitely a try before you buy CD.
The Story of Tina came up when we discovered she is to appear at the Custom's House doing a tribute to Piaf. The mind boggles; unless there is a third string to her vocal chords, whichever mode Tina is in Mme Piaf May turn in her tombe.

Anonymous said...

Another attempt to blog!! whilst I cannot reallly claim to know the Instrumentalists that lance so clearaly does..I do love all the standards which he mentions. I am a great one for words, and being brought up with Jazz, from my father, I had an early appreciation of the great American songbook. I can get a song in my head, and like Lance it just stays there until another jumps in. Talking of "I'll take romance" I adore the Eydie Gorme version..great vocalist!

Anonymous said...

Spelt "clearly" wrong, sorry, and this is from
Liz!!

Lance said...

Welcome Liz, don't worry about spelling (check out my attempt at anecdote in an earlier post) what counts is enthusiasm for music and by music I certainly include words. Many tunes would be nothing without the words and many lyrics would be inane but for a strong melody. My own favourite version of 'I'll Take Romance' is by June Christy on the legendary 'Something Cool' album

Anonymous said...

Really missing "thejazz" on my Roberts DAB, on my kitchen window sill. I used to have it tuned all day long, and boy did it make those chores seem easier! I know it can be heard on line, but not for me, as I want to hear it whilst I am moving around downstairs, and the PC is up!!A huge loss. Just bought my son 2 CD's of the Rosenberg trio for his birthday present, I know he is gonna' be thrilled with them. Got them from Amazon
Liz

Lance said...

Yeah Liz those Rosenbergs have got the Django thing off to a tee. Brilliant.
Good guitar at the Side tonight. Nick Pride and the Pimptones (honest!). A very funky, dancy groove; not that there is much room for dancing at the Side. Still, an excellent and imaginative band; David Wilde (sax/flute), Alex Leathard (tmb), Nick Pride (gtr), Ian Paterson (bs/gtr), Oz Cassidy (dms).

Lance said...

Having been impressed by Nick Pride at the Side (poetic) I journeyed via my bus pass to Durham where Nick and Graham Hardy were the wallpaper at the Gala Theatre bar/restaurant. Very pleasant but far removed from the funk of the Pimptones and the fiery trumpet that is Graham's norm. Still it probably suited the blue rinsed diners and I did enjoy the bus ride.
More to my taste was the Blue Note cd of Lee Morgan's - 'The Sidewinder'. Despite being recorded over 40 years this was the first time I'd heard the disc in its entirety and it was worth the wait. Joe Henderson was an awesome tenor player.

Anonymous said...

I don't know these musicians of course Lance, but since you mentioned blue rinsed diners,presumably lunch time, perhaps the mood was tempered by the time of day. Still Durham is a lovely city, and the free ride appealing! I believe that Sondheim is featured on Elaine Paige's essential musicals today. It is Maria Friedman's choice I think. So for once I shall be tuned in with high expectations
Liz

Anonymous said...

Correction, it is next week for Maria Friedman. This week it is Liza Minnelli's essential musical.
Liz

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