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Bebop Spoken There

Oscar Peterson: "I find most pianists use too many notes in a chord. They double up an awful lot" - (Crescendo May 1963).

Benny Green (British): "...there was a whole race of men who used to stand in front of their bands, waving their arms, pretending to conduct ... Many of the bandleaders we had worked for had been either crooks or imposters ... " - (Crescendo March 1963).

Today Saturday September 22

Afternoon

Festival of Thrift - Kirkleatham, Redcar, Cleveland TS10 5NW. 10:00am. Line-up

Evening

Emma Fisk & James Birkett - St Cuthbert’s Church, 5 Woodside, Shadforth, Co. Durham DH6 1LD. 7:30pm £10.00 (u16 free) includes finger buffet, BYOB.

Ruby Turner - ARC, Dovecot Street, Stockton on Tees TS18 1LL. Tel: 01642 525199. 8:00pm. £20.00. + £2.00. b/f.

The Hookahs - Billy Bootleggers, Nelson St, Newcastle NE1 5AN. 9:00pm. Free.

To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Tuesday, July 31, 2018

July's Best.

CDs
Shake 'Em Up Jazz Band: A Woman's Place/Le Donne Mangiano Zucchero.
Bansangu Orchestra.
Trialogue: First Flight.
Marty Elkins: Fat Daddy.
Chet Baker: Live in London Vol. 2.
Mark Winkler & Cheryl Bentyne: Eastern Standard Time.
Gigs.
Taylor Smith & Roamin' Jasmine @ Kommunity, Newcastle.
Gunhild Carling @ Gala Theatre.
James Morrison Quartet @ Gala Theatre.
Greg Abate @ Jazz Café.
Davina & The Vagabonds @ Sage Gateshead.

As always, purely my personal choice - let's have yours.
Lance.

Classic Swing @ The Ship, Monkseaton - July 31.

Olive Rudd (vocals); Bob Wade (trumpet/flugel/clarinet); Jim McBriarty (clarinet/tenor); Neville Hartley (trombone); Colin Haikney (piano); Alan Rudd (bass); Tommy Graham (drums) + Gordon Solomon (trombone).
(Review by Lance/photos by Russell).
The Metro reached Monkseaton without mishap enabling us to reach The Ship - built in 1688 - just in time for Classic Swing to kick off their regular Tuesday lunchtime session.
Vocalist Olive gave me an effusive greeting saying, "I must have known you were coming as I've included I Wished on the Moon in the setlist." Full marks for remembering that this is one of my favourite tunes.
Good to hear Neville Hartley and, second set, Gordon Solomon on trombone. Their duo choruses brought to mind J and K. The not so good news was that regular trombonist Don Fairley couldn't make it due to ill health.
We wish him well. 

Alice Grace & Pawel Jedrzejewski and The Milne-Glendinning Band @ The Jazz Café - July 27

(Review/photos courtesy of Ken Drew)
The third visit by Jazz North East to the Jazz Café in a week!  Following on from Jesse Bannister/GemArts (co-promo with JNE) last Thursday and a wonderful treat it was, and Greg Abate with the local power trio last Friday (high octane playing all-round) this Friday saw a more relaxed session as part of Jazz North East's 'Women Make Music' series. The programme comprised two sets of distinctive music focusing on vocalist-guitarist collaborations, one well established in recent years and the other recently formed, with many tunes self-penned and performed by our locally based musicians.

Monday, July 30, 2018

Jazz in the Afternoon @ Cullercoats Crescent Club - July 30

(Review by Russell)
A typical Monday afternoon down at the Crescent Club - the Jazz in the Afternoon band plus a few sitters-in. This week, all the way from Oz, Don Armstrong and Harry Stephenson, and, from just around the corner, the Cullercoats Songstress herself, Teresa (no relation to Don) Armstrong. 

When You and I Were Young, Maggie then Sonny Terry and Brownie McGhee's Livin' with the Blues, a regulation start from frontman Herbie Hudson and the boys. More from Hudson the vocalist singing about My Gal Sal, one from the band's other singer, drummer Fred Thompson - I'm Confessin' (That I Love You) - and in no time the first set outer - Back Home in Indiana - with Hudson once more taking the vocal mic alongside the seated Don Armstrong on clarinet. 

CD (EP) review: George Winstone - Outer Spaces

George Winstone (alto sax/composer); Charlie Stacey (piano); Mikeli Montolli (bass); Jamie Murray (drums).
(Review by Lance).
In an idiom where identity has almost become  set in stone (or should that be vinyl?), it comes as somewhat of a surprise to find someone whose style isn't Parker or Pepper, Coleman or Cannonball, Desmond or Dolphy but a player who has incorporated many of those latterday saints into his approach whilst still forging his own identity. Winstone has managed this.
This, however, is a two-edged sword.

Preview: Jazz Planets - Pete Long and The Echoes of Ellington Orchestra

Cadogan Hall, 5 Sloane Terrace, London, SW1 9DQl Saturday, September 8 at 7.30pm
(Press release) 
September 2018 is the centenary of the premiere of Gustav Holst’s much-loved composition ‘The Planets.’  In a unique celebration, bandleader Pete Long (Ronnie Scott’s Orchestra / Jools Holland’s Rhythm and Blues Orchestra) has re-written Holst’s masterwork in the style of Jazz’s greatest composer Duke Ellington.
Pete Long’s ‘Jazz Planets’ will be performed live in concert by The Echoes of Ellington Orchestra in the beautiful Cadogan Hall, one of London’s best concert venues just off Chelsea’s Sloane Square.
 The inspiration for this unusual concept arrived by chance during a long car journey, as Long explains: “Venus from The Planets Suite came on the radio. It suddenly struck me how Ellingtonian the curves of the melody were, and how Holst's warped, flowing harmonic symmetry was so redolent of that of Ellington's composing partner, Billy Strayhorn.  By the time I'd reached my destination, the broad idea of re-orchestrating the whole suite for an Ellington-style orchestra had coalesced.”

Sunday, July 29, 2018

RIP Tomasz Stanko

Polish jazz trumpet player, Tomasz Stanko passed away today. Stanko appeared several times at GIJF as well as the London Jazz Festival and, invariably attracted a large audience of fans who appreciated his free, avant-garde style playing.
Tomasz Stanko was 76.
Rest In Peace.
Lance.
Obituary.

Andy Lawrenson Trio @ Prohibition Bar, Gateshead - July 28

Andy Lawrenson (violin, vocals); Simon O'Byrne (guitar, vocals); Paul Grainger (double bass)
(Review by Russell)
Prohibition Bar's lovingly crafted homage to an era of US bootleg liquor, European decadence and good times came into its own this evening with an appearance by the Andy Lawrenson Trio. A select audience listened intently as a swing dance couple - Anja and Alec - effortlessly evoked the period. 
Le Cafe Parisien is violinist Lawrenson's latest project encompassing the jazz of Reinhardt and Grappelli with Celtic and Romani influences alongside one of the great improvisers of this or any era...JS Bach. Minor Swing established the mood and Lawrenson's first vocal of the evening - It had to be You - suggested the trio's approach would be one of casual virtuosity.  

CD Review: Mark Winkler & Cheryl Bentyne - Eastern Standard Time.

Mark Winkler, Cheryl Bentyne (vocals); Rich Eames (piano); Bob Sheppard (sax); Grant Geissman (guitar); Pat Kelley (guitar on 1 track only); Gabe Davis (bass); Dave Tull (drums); Kevin Winard (percussion); Stephanie Fife (cello).
(Review by Lance).
The blurb says that Mark Winkler and Cheryl Bentyne go together like champagne and caviar. I'm sure they do but, as we impoverished bloggers (we do it for love) don't get many opportunities to sip champers or nibble caviar, I'll just have to take their word for it.
I haven't heard the duo's previous album, West Coast Cool, but I have heard them both individually and, of course, Cheryl's contribution to Man Tran so I knew the pair of them together would be something rather special and I wasn't wrong.
Seven duo tracks and four solos (2 each) make for an outstanding, varied album. Both singers have distinctive voices; Bentyne the cooler, jazzier, Winkler the hotter, more soulful yet together all of those qualities merge into one.
The material is a mix of the familiar, the not so familiar and the, to me, totally unfamiliar.

Saturday, July 28, 2018

Tyneside Cinema: The Geordie Jazzman - a film by Abi Lewis.

(Review by Lance).
You wait a long time for a legend then two come along almost at once. Thursday night, at Washington Arts Centre, The Desert Queen told the story of Gertrude Bell. A lady who defied convention to help make the Arab world a better place.
The Geordie Jazzman told the story of Keith Crombie and the Jazz Café, Newcastle. A gentleman who defied convention to help make the northeast a better place - at least music-wise. Whether either one of them succeeded is debatable. The middle-east is in disarray and jazz has no shortage of warring tribes either.
This was the second time I'd seen the film and, as one of the pundits said afterward, "I picked up on many of the nuances I missed the first time around".
Me too. The man was such an enigma.

Friday, July 27, 2018

Francis Tulip Quartet @ The Lit & Phil, Newcastle - July 27

Francis Tulip (guitar); Ben Lawrence (piano); Michael Dunlop (bass); Matt MacKellar (drums)
(Review by Russell).
This lunchtime concert was a late addition to the published series. Would this fact impact on audience numbers? It did, for the better, with a huge turn out leaving some later comers standing for the duration. Four young men - three of them enjoying a break from their degree studies, the other soon to go to university - playing to an astonishingly high standard, this was the Francis Tulip Quartet. 
Visions opened the programme. Sounding vaguely familiar, it was, of course, a composition by bandleader Tulip. Keep Me in Mind was very familiar, it being a John Scofield number. The youngest member of the quartet, pianist Ben Lawrence, showed what he could do at the Lit and Phil's beautiful piano. 

Strictly Smokin' Big Band with Kermit the frog @ The Millstone - July 26

(Review by Russell)
With the boss absent the temptation was there to get up to mischief, however, MD Michael Lamb can rest easy, on a steamy early evening the boys and girls of the orchestra got down to business, as usual. Keeping an eye on matters, and an ear to the ground, was a very special guest...Kermit the Frog.
F'reez got the show on the road with Let the Good Times Roll and it wasn't too long before his vocal partner-in-crime Alice Grace joined the party, greeting a full house at the Millstone  with the words: Happy heatwave! With Pete Tanton's muted trumpet work AG scatted on Honeysuckle Rose. If there was an admission charge to this regular public rehearsal session - there isn't - it would be worth every penny simply to hear AG sing. And sing again did the Strictly Smokin' vocalist as she insisted, with no little humour, Somebody Loves Me.

Thursday, July 26, 2018

The Desert Queen, a play by David Farn @ Washington Arts Centre - July 26.

Phillippa Wilson (Gertrude Bell); Brian Londsdale (various roles).
(Review by Lance)
I know, I know, not exactly material for a jazz blog but, the pace of the story, the injections of humour and pathos, have all the ingredients of an Ellington suite.
Amazingly, I'd never heard of Gertrude Bell until, maybe, 10 years ago. At school, we learned of such fearless females as Florence Nightingale and Grace Darling but, despite being born about 5 miles away in Washington, Co. Durham, ne'er a word about Gertrude Bell - arguably, one of the most influential women ever.
Tonight's play by David Farn, attempts to redress the balance and I'm sure that anyone who witnesses the show - there's another 9 performances in the region between now and August 6 - will come away fascinated by her story.

Jam session @ The Dun Cow, Jesmond - July 25

Stu Collingwood (piano); Paul Grainger (double bass); Abbie Finn (drums) + Kate O'Neill (vocals); Harry Keeble (tenor); Stu Finden (tenor); Fiona Finden (vocals); Richard Herdman (guitar); Jen Errington (vocals); George Sykes (tenor); Dawn Furness (vocals); Kay Usher (violin); John Rowland (tenor)
(Review/photos by Russell).
Late July, schools out, students gone, would anyone turn up? On another warm evening with the door to the conservatory open the house rhythm section - Stu Collingwood, Paul Grainger and Abbie Finn - set up then set sail on a relaxed Wave. The sitters-in began to arrive in Brandling Park, some by car, some by Metro, some on foot and that most laid back of tenor players, John Rowland, parked his velocipede outside of the Dun Cow. 

Preview: Extra! Extra! Read all about the Francis Tulip Quartet
















Tomorrow (Friday) an extra event has been added to the monthly lunchtime jazz concert series. Four exceptionally talented young musicians will play for sixty minutes, the programme comprising standards and perhaps one or two original compositions. 
Francis Tulip, guitar, Ben Lawrence, piano, Michael Dunlop, bass and drummer Matt MacKellar are enjoying a break from their studies and this additional concert at the Lit and Phil on Westgate Road (near Central Station) in Newcastle is an opportunity for them to get together to play a gig. If you're yet to hear these young men then do make the effort, it's £5 on the door, one o'clock start, you'll be mightily impressed!  
Russell 
Attachme

CD Review: Chet Baker - Live in London Volume 2.

Chet Baker (trumpet/vocals); John Horler (piano); Jim Richardson (bass); Tony Mann (drums). March/April 1983, London.
(Review by Lance)
I think it was in November 1955 that Jeff Kruger, who ran the Flamingo Club on Wardour St., presented Chet Baker in concert at the Royal Albert Hall - as a singer.
At the time, Baker was the trumpet player. He was touring Europe and, like all trumpet players from Satchmo to Dizzy, only sang to give his chops a rest but, because of MU restrictions on foreign musicians entering the UK, he was forbidden to play trumpet.
From what I recall from the reviews back then, his singing wasn't well received. On the jazz front, it was Jimmy Rushing, Joe Williams and George Melly who figured in the polls - none of them shrinking violets - whilst the pop charts in those pre-rock 'n' roll years were dominated by the shouters such as Frankie Laine and Johnny Ray. Even Sinatra hadn't quite recaptured the public as a singer so the fragrant will o' the wisp vocals of Chet were given short shrift. Little did those critics know that, years later, the voice would be ranked alongside the all-time greats.

Kinkajous & Grey Tapes @ Gosforth Civic Theatre - July 25

Kinkajous: Adrien Cau (tenor/bass clarinet); Benoit Parmener (drums); Maria Chiara Argiro, Jack Doherty (keys); Andres Castellanos (bass guitar).

Grey Tapes: Mr Blazey, Bert Verso, Calum Howard, Bain (electronica); Dan Potter (drums).

I hold up my hand and confess that, in a world of horses for courses, I was the wrong horse for this course and, as such, it would be unfair of me to attempt to review something that I didn't understand. 
This parade passed me by completely. 
Cau had some moments on both tenor and bass clarinet but, overall, I was struggling although the others present in the well-attended auditorium were very appreciative of both bands so it looks like I'm the one who's out of step. 
Lance

Wednesday, July 25, 2018

RIP Clive Gray

Just received the sad news that one of the northeast's jazz legends passed away on Monday, July 23.
Clive Gray was renowned not only for his fine banjo playing but also his sense of humour.
When I worked in J.G. Windows Music Store alongside his longtime musical confederate, Ronnie McLean, Clive was a regular customer buying Clarion banjo strings. He was the only person I knew who used Clarion Strings and we had to order them in specially for him.
I once asked him what it was about them that made them so special. Longevity, tonal quality, resonance? 
"Coz they're the cheapest" was his reply.
He played in most of the local trad bands at one time or another including the Vieux Carré Jazzmen, Ronnie McLean All-Stars, and the Savannah Syncopators. In the photo, Clive is pictured in between concerts at the 1981 Breda Oude Stijl Jazz Festival.

Paul Skerritt & James Harrison @ The Jazz Café - July 24

Paul Skerritt (vocals); James Harrison (pianos).
(Review by Lance/Photos courtesy of Mike Tilley).
I'm never quite sure how to categorise this dynamic duo. Individually, they are at the top of their game, but, together, it can sometimes be a little over the top. Fortunately, tonight the balance was just about right. Sure there was the tomfoolery and the shenanigans but there was also the cool vocals and the hard-swinging piano. 
The material ranged from gassers to more contemporary songs delivered in the manner of Postmodern Jukebox. Not many singers can do a Gregory Porter song without coming in a distant second but Paul ran the great man close on Take me to the Alley. The Jazz Café does have a nearby alley but no one took up the option.
The opener, Swingin' Down the Jazz Café, told us that the, soon to be, father of twins had put some thought into the gig and the lyrics were, again, appropriate.

Classic Swing @ The Ship, Monkseaton - July 24

Bob Wade (trumpet, flugelhorn); Jim McBriarty (tenor sax, clarinet, vocals); Don Fairley (trombone); Colin Haikney (piano); Alan Rudd (double bass); Tommy Graham (drums), Olive Rudd (vocals).
(Review by Russell)

If it's Tuesday it must be the Ship Inn. Classic Swing's weekly Monkseaton residency continues to attract a good number of folk to listen to the New Orleans to swing era band fronted by vocalist Olive Rudd alongside explosive trumpeter Bob Wade. 

It Don't Mean a Thing sang Olive and the boys in the band - including Mr Alan Rudd - tended to agree. Out of Nowhere with Wade playing flugelhorn is a favourite of band and audience featuring relaxed solos across the frontline. 

Tuesday, July 24, 2018

A Night in New Orleans: The Shake ‘Em Up Band & Ali Affleck and the Copper Cats @ Edinburgh Assembly Halls. - July 20

Shake Em Up Jazz Band:  Haruka Kikuchi (trombone); Marla Dixon (trumpet/vocals): Chloe Feoranzo (clarinet/vocals); Molly Reeves (guitar/vocals); Julie Schexnayder (bass); Defne 'Dizzy' Incirlioglu (washboard/percussion)
(Review by Kay Collin/Photos are © AJBlairPhotography and may not be used without the permission of Sandy Blair)*
Having heard the Shake Em Up Jazz Band well and truly shake things up in New Orleans last year, Ali Affleck wanted us all to share in her delight, and here they were and so we did. Formed two years ago, the Shake Em Up Jazz band brings together six individually gifted musicians each acclaimed musicians in their own right, and members of various established bands.Their set in tonight’s  performance featured tracks from their first album ‘Le Donne Mangiano Zucchero’ along with many from their new album ‘A Woman’s Place’ (see Lance's review), put together to celebrate and pay tribute to women composers and lyricists, and their legacy of arranging, composing and developing jazz since its earliest days.

Lickety Split @The Globe - July 22

Callum Mellis (trumpet, flugelhorn); Alan Marshall (alto); Paul Gowland (tenor); Eddie Bellis (trombone); Bradley Johnston (guitar); Jeremy McMurray (keyboards); Alan Rudd (bass); Paul Wight (drums) 
(Review by Russell)
Eddie Bellis' West Coast-style eight-piece band was playing its second gig in two days having fulfilled an engagement at the newly reopened Spanish City. The Jazz Co-op's Globe HQ on Railway Street, Newcastle welcomed the return of Eddie and the boys and this evening there was a new face in the line-up - Lambton Big Band MD, trumpeter Callum Mellis.

Jazz Social @ Charts, Newcastle - July 22

Stuart Collingwood (piano); Neil Harland (double bass); Matt MacKellar (drums)
(Review by Russell)
After a delay, it's up and running. The scheduled opening of Charts on the Quayside was put back a week or two and when it finally opened its doors the first of a new weekly (Sunday) jam session - Jazz Social - took place last week. Yesterday, BSH managed to get along to the second installment and it has to be said the former Flynn's public house has been transformed into a comfortable, if not swanky, cafe/bar boasting panoramic views across the Tyne to Sage Gateshead. 

Monday, July 23, 2018

Zoe Gilby Trio @ Great Exhibition of the North, Blackett Street, Newcastle - July 22

Zoe Gilby Trio: Zoe Gilby (vocals); Paul Edis (piano); Andy Champion (double bass)
(Review by Russell).
A second day of jazz in the rather bizarre surroundings of a traffic free, artificial grass-carpeted playground on Blackett Street featured Zoe Gilby singing a selection of standards and original material. BSH made a dash by Metro from Whitley Bay to Monument in Newcastle city centre to catch a third and final set on Sunday afternoon. 

Rendezvous Jazz @ Spanish City - July 22

Maureen Hall (vocals); Gavin Lee (clarinet, alto sax); Don Fairley (trombone); Malcolm Armstrong (keyboards); John Robinson (double bass); George Davidson (drums, vocals)
(Review by Russell).
Spanish City, once neglected, has been restored to its former glory. A familiar landmark on Whitley Bay seafront for more than a century, the striking architectural structure officially reopened to the public today. Over the weekend its doors opened to a curious public eager to take a look inside. They queued in their hundreds, possibly thousands, and no one could be other than impressed with the lovingly renovated building.

CD Reviews: Shake 'Em Up Jazz Band - A Woman's Place & Le Donne Mangiano Zucchero

Marla Dixon (trumpet/vocals); Chloe Feoranzo (clarinet/vocals); Haruka Kikuchi (trombone/vocals); Molly Reeves (guitar/vocals); Julie Schenayder (bass); Define 'Dizzy' Incirlioglu (washboard).
(Review by Lance).
Despite my gripe in the previous post, here are a couple of CDs that are more than welcome - they're essential! Essential, that is for those who want a memento of the band's recent barnstorming tour of County Durham as part of the Durham Brass Festival and even more essential for those who didn't catch them. They'll be crying in their beer for weeks to come when they find out what they've missed.

Sunday, July 22, 2018

Lance's Lament

The situation's out of control. I've now got more unopened, unlistened to CDs than I could ever hope to review and I don't know what to do with them (up yours too!) I doubt if any of my local charity shops will find a demand for 273 albums of original compositions by someone they've never heard of so, artists, agents, hustlers, please do not bombard me with unsolicited CDs without emailing for permission first and, if I don't reply, it's not bad manners - well it is I suppose and I apologise - but take it for a no-no. Also, please forget about downloads. If someone has forked out postage to send me their baby then it has a small chance, not a big one but at least a chance.

British Jazz Awards 2018. Nominations announced.

We are pleased to announce that northeast based violinist Emma Fisk has been nominated in the Miscellaneous Instrument Category of the 2018 British Jazz Awards organised by Big Bear Music of Birmingham.
To vote for Emma or any of your favourite British jazz musicians go to Nominations.
Lance.

Davina & the Vagabonds @ SummerTyne Americana Festival - July 21

Davina Lozier (piano, vocals); Zach Lozier (trumpet, vocals); Steve Rogness (trombone, vocals); Chris Bates (upright bass); Andrew 'Dizzy' Gillespie (drums).
(Review by Lance).
This has been quite a few days for festivals and high profile gigs. Durham Brass, Mouth of the Tyne, Tall Ships and now SummerTyne Americana at Sage Gateshead. None of them were out and out jazz festivals but all contained jazz, or jazz-related music, in one form or another. In the case of the latter clambake, Nashville was the hub rather than New Orleans or New York although D and the Vs were from Minnesota and the North Star State should be mighty proud of 'em.

Saturday, July 21, 2018

Mississippi Dreamboats @ Great Exhibition of the North, Blackett Street, Newcastle - July 21

Liz Bacon (clarinet); Jeff Milner (trombone); Richard Speight (banjo, vocals); Ray Newton (double bass); Paul Bacon (drums)
(Review by Russell)
It's been one of those days...a lunchtime trip on the Metro to Regent Centre, then a short walk into Gosforth to listen to a local country blues guitarist only to discover the event wasn't due to start until late afternoon. What to do?

Walk along the Great North Road on to Gosforth High Street to resume the life-long search (rummaging in second-hand shops) for that recording by Buddy Bolden that no one believes was ever made. No luck, some other day. A bus into town, the latest issue of Jazzwise is out and, after a lengthy hiatus, WH Smith has resumed stocking Downbeat (the July issue is on the newsstand).  

It's All Abaht Abate. Greg Abate w. the Paul Edis Trio @ The Jazz Café - July 20

Greg Abate (alto); Paul Edis (piano); Andy Champion (bass); Russ Morgan (drums).
(Review by Lance/photo courtesy of Ken Drew).
On May 15, 1953, Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, Bud Powell, Charlie Mingus and Max Roach knocked out the audience at Toronto's Massey Hall. On the same evening at Chicago Stadium, Rocky Marciano knocked out Jersey Joe Walcott in  2 minutes 25 seconds for the Heavyweight Championship of the World.
On July 20, 2018, Greg Abate took even less time to knock out the Jazz Café audience and claim, in this listener's opinion, the Alto Sax Championship of the World with a solo on Yardbird Suite that was the musical equivalent of the right cross that put Walcott away in their first fight a year previous.
Absolutely stunning.
That's All, Softly as in a Morning Sunrise, Bluesette, Kenny Barron's Voyage - played at a tempo round about the speed of light and pity help anyone who hadn't fastened their safety belt - were nothing less than magnificent.

Mo Scott Trio @ SummerTyne Americana - July 20

Mo Scott (vocals); Gary Dunn (guitar); Neil Harland (double bass)

Typical, weeks of unbroken sunshine then on the first day of this year's SummerTyne Americana Festival it rained. Not much but, with electrics on the outdoor Jumpin' Hot Club stage, it necessitated a switch indoors to Sage Gateshead's riverfront concourse.
As a rule, Bebop Spoken Here doesn't follow or report on all things Americana, however, there are exceptions. One such is blues shouter par excellence Mo Scott. Not that this was a blues set, far from it, with Mo tailoring her set to the Americana theme.  
Accompanying Mo were bassist Neil Harland and guitarist Gary Dunn, two first call musicians and long-time associates of our vocalist. The ten-gallon Stetsons sat, and stood, right across the concourse as Mo held them rapt. Ry Cooder's Borderline (Mo at pains to say just how good the American is), the Neville Brothers' Yellow Moon with Gary Dunn impressing the cowpokes, and to close an all too short set, Muddy Waters' Blow Wind Blow
Americana is up and running. If you're yet to get your tickets for Davina and the Vagabonds (Saturday, 10:30pm) don't delay, it'll be one of the gigs of the year!    
Russell

Greg Abate & Paul Edis @ The Gala Theatre, Durham - July 20

Greg Abate (alto sax); Paul Edis (piano)
(Review by Russell/Photos courtesy of Malcolm Sinclair).
There was little sign of a break in the prolonged spell of fine weather and upon arriving at Durham's Gala Theatre Greg Abate and Paul Edis were sitting on the terrace putting together a set list for their lunchtime gig. Invariably the venue's monthly jazz concert is a sellout and today's performance didn't depart from the script. 

Secret Love to start with the American post-bop alto saxophonist Greg Abate taking the tune to town, throwing down the gauntlet to pianist Paul Edis and it came as no surprise that the north east's finest was more than up to the mark. Bye Bye Blackbird, Edis, then Abate, making solo statements, a sensitive reading of Alone Together followed by a corker...Parker's Mood with it's stop time chorus and Abate's mid-solo cry of 'Yeah!' 

Burton Agnes Jazz Festival - July 13, 14, 15.

(Review by Sheila Herrick)
Last weekend saw another glorious celebration of Jazz and Blues, with an additional mix of soul, Latin, rock, funk and folk in an idyllic setting. Glorious weather too, appreciated especially by those camping in the adjoining field.  Burton Agnes is a delightful festival on an intimate scale with excellent facilities and a friendly, family atmosphere.
At 6:30pm on Friday,  the main stage kicked off with Tiptoe followed by rhe cleverly named ElecTrio
Matt and Carlos, a guitar duo, started Saturday afternoon off in mellow, Latin, fashion followed by Zoe Gilby and band, Zoe needs no introduction to readers of bebop spoken here, and, not surprisingly, was very well received by the audience basking in the sun and the music. Ubunye injected Zulu power to their vocals as well as a personal story.

Friday, July 20, 2018

Preview: Davina & the Vagabonds return to Sage Gateshead!

Quick! Tickets are flying out the door for Davina and the Vagabonds' late night SummerTyne Americana show. It's exactly four years to the day (July 20, 2014) that Davina Sowers (now Davina Lozier) played a killer set on the Jumpin' Hot Club outdoor stage. On that occasion Davina made a huge impression, a lasting memory is of the Twin Cities' musician belting out I'd Rather Go Blind

The following year Davina returned to Sage Gateshead to play Gateshead International Jazz Festival. Bebop Spoken Here's Editor in Chief was there and was suitably impressed! Now, three albums later - 2011's Black Cloud, 2014's Sunshine and the 2016 live album Nicolette and Tenth (I'd Rather Go Blind is on it!) - Davina is to play a late night show (10:30) tomorrow evening (Saturday) in Sage Two. 

A red hot band, N'Awlins' street savvie, a Memphis dirty blues feel, first rate musicianship and...Davina. Presence, star quality, great voice, this is one gig that you simply must not miss! To bag one of the last few tickets call Sage Gateshead's ticket office on 0191 443 4666.    
Russell   

WHAT MAKES GROOVE GROOVE?

Swing, Latin, Afro-Cuban – learn how to get in the groove at the Jazz.Coop Summer Weekend Workshop on 4-5 August 2018 at the Globe. It is a whole weekend of listening and playing in the company of others who want to learn and improve jazz skills.

Building on the success of the last three years, Jazz Coop is running another weekend workshop, this time with Jamil Sheriff and Caroline Boaden who are both tutors at Leeds College of Music.

With just two weeks to go there are still a few places available for horns and other melody instruments, so if you are interested and available please book now.

Full details and booking form here:

China Coast to Cullercoats - July 18

(Review by Russell).
If it's mid-July then as sure as night follows day a paddle steamer full of Kowloon jazz fanatics sets sail for the northeast coast of England. Alright, they fly in, get along to every New Orleans/Dixieland session going then head home, 'home' is the Far East for Colin Aitchison, Franco Valussi and Neville Sarony together with family and friends. On this session at Cullercoats Crescent Club, the China Coast Jazzmen were joined by Don Armstrong, another ex-pat making a long journey, all the way from Oz. 

Wednesdays at Cullercoats is, of course, the Vieux Carré Jazzmen's regular gig. A bumper crowd turned out to listen to Brian Bennett's popular six-piece band and a dizzying number of guests. Way Down Yonder in New OrleansA Smo-o-o-oth OneBye Bye Blues - three tunes to get things started, Fred Thompson taking the vocal on the first of them. 

Francis Tulip Quartet @The Fox Inn, Hexham - July 17

Francis Tulip (guitar); Joel Brown (piano); Michael Dunlop (bass); Matthew MacKellar (drums)
(Review by Russell)
Thumbs up to the Edinburgh-Newcastle rail service. It was on time - why shouldn't it be? - thus enabling your correspondent to dash up to Hexham to catch the Francis Tulip Quartet's return visit to Hexham Jazz Club. 
The Fox Inn was busy. Francis Tulip & co were sitting outside making the most of the summer weather before the start of their first set at eight thirty. A Deuchar's the choice, 'hello' to Tom, Ines and Jamie, a seat, 'hello' to Mike and Pauline - they had come from all parts.

Thursday, July 19, 2018

Bratislava Hot Serenaders & the Serenaders Sisters @ Edinburgh Jazz and Blues Festival - July 17

(Review by Russell)
Edinburgh Jazz and Blues Festival was in full swing as the Bratislava Hot Serenaders took to the stage for the first of three concert performances. Later in the day the twenty piece orchestra would play in the the George Square Spiegeltent and the following evening conclude their visit in the Festival Theatre but this Tuesday lunchtime engagement focused upon the 'Dance Band Days' with a set list comprising the best of the British and American bands of the 20s and 30s. 
The Gothic style Teviot Row is the world's oldest purpose built student union building and up on the third floor, accessed via a spiralling stone staircase, the Bratislavans assembled on stage in front of a capacity audience. Ellington to start - Cotton Club Stomp - then 'S Wonderful as played by Ambrose. Band leader Juraj Bartos outlined the format; the best of the dance bands, many from this side of the Atlantic with some numbers from the Americans, all played entirely acoustically with the exception of one vocal mic and a condenser mic above the strings.  

Durham Brass Festival Preview: Jambone with Laura Jurd. Saturday 21 July – Gala Theatre – 12 noon

This has got to be the best brass bargain bar none and it's FREE! - Lance.
(Press release)
Based at the Sage in Gateshead and directed by Paul Edis, Jambone is a youth jazz ensemble. Performing in high profile concerts and events with some of the great jazz artists.  Packed full of talented young musicians, in recent years members of the band have taken part in the BBC Young Jazz Musicians of the Year and have featured as part of the BBC Introducing Scheme with a performance on Radio 3. Jambone makes regular performances at festivals including the Gateshead International Jazz Festival, London Jazz Festival, Manchester Jazz Festival and Skye Jazz and Swing Festival and at the Parliamentary Jazz Awards.

Durham Brass Festival: Shake 'Em Up Jazz Band @ Chester-le- St. - July 18

Marla Dixon (trumpet/vocal); Haruka Kikuchi (trombone); Chloe Feoranza (clarinet/vocal); Molly Reeves (guitar/vocal); Dizzy Incirlioglu (washboard); Julie Schexnayder (bass).
(Review by Lance).
This year's Durham Brass Festival has been an eyeopener for me. In previous years, I concentrated on the big hitters - the names - blissfully ignoring what was happening on the street. I may have done the same this year if I hadn't arrived early for Friday night's Chrissy Lee/Gunhild Carling concert and heard the Shake 'Em Up Jazz Band playing a short set outside of the Gala Theatre.
I couldn't quite believe what I was hearing. Six girls blowing like as though Jelly Roll Morton's Red Hot Peppers lived. Russell confirmed that the piquancy of the music came over with equal potency at Seaburn the following day and the two sets at Chester-le-Street last night sent me home, not on the number 21 Angel of the North bus, but on the Lucky 7 Cloud - destination Storyville.

Wednesday, July 18, 2018

CD Review: Bansangu Orchestra

(Review by Lance).
Bansangu's name derives from Brazillian percussionist Airto Moreira's habit of saying "Ban san gu' when paying his musicians. Translated it means 'Band Sounds Good!'
It was back in 2014 that ace tenor player Paul Booth got together with Giorgio Serci and Kevin Robinson to formulate the idea of a traditional big band playing music from a diverse range of cultures such as African, Brazillian, Caribbean, Celtic, Cuban, Indian and Middle Eastern. This they do without losing the overall jazz feeling but, at the same time, adding a different dimension.

Tuesday, July 17, 2018

Two special gigs on Friday.

(Preview by Brian Ebbatson)
On Friday this week (July 20) we again have an international flavour for our Gala Lunchtime concert as we welcome back US saxophonist/flautist, Greg Abate, together with our own Paul Edis. Greg and Paul's previous appearances in the Gala Lunchtime concert series, in July 2016 and November 2017 were enthusiastically received, so I know many of you will be looking forward to their return.
For those who don't know Greg Abate, his main instrument is alto sax, considering Charlie Parker, Paul Desmond and Phil Woods among his most important influences. He also plays tenor, flute, and soprano, and has an international recording career dating back to the 1980s, including a double CD with Phil Woods, and tributes to the music of both Woods and Dave Brubeck. In his earlier years, he played in the Ray Charles Orchestra (replacing David 'Fathead' Newman in 1973) and later in the Artie Shaw band. He has been a regular visitor to the North East since 2011, building a genuine partnership of equals with Paul Edis on piano.
Gala Theatre, Millennium Pl., Durham DH1 1WA. 1:00pm. £5.
----- 
(Preview by Lance)
On the evening of that very same Friday (July 20), Greg and Paul appear at the Jazz Café along with Andy Champion on bass and Russ Morgan on drums.
Promoted by JNE, this will serve as the main course after the lunchtime appetizer. Having heard Greg several times going back to 2011 at the Corner House I've never failed to be impressed by his playing, especially with Paul Edis. The addition of Russ and Andy promises to make this a night to remember.
Jazz Café, 25 Pink Lane, Newcastle NE1 5DW. 7:45pm. £10 (£8 concessions).

Durham Brass Festival: James Morrison Quartet @ Gala Theatre - January 16.

James Morrison (trumpet/trombone/flugel/piano); William Morrison (guitar); Harry Morrison (bass); Patrick Danao (drums).
(Review by Lance).
Another knockout Durham Brass Festival concert. This time by the amazingly gifted Australian multi-instrumentalist James Morrison.
Morrison, accompanied by sons William and Harry along with super drummer Danao blew trumpet à la Dizzy, trombone with the rapid technique of JJ and, on piano, just about outran Peterson.
A Beautiful Friendship began soft and gentle,  treating the ballad with the respect it deserves. A nice solo from his number 2 son William on guitar before James exploded reaching Dizzy heights and beyond. We also got a taster of Danao's drums.
In the Silence of the Night, a composition by William featured his pop on a most unusual instrument.
Difficult to make out from where I was sitting. It could be a rotary valved flugelhorn or some kind of bass trumpet. It had the mellifluous sound of a flugel but maybe it was a hybrid James himself had designed.

Monday, July 16, 2018

The Reunion @ Blaydon Jazz Club - July 15

Colin Aitchison (trumpet, teapot, vocals); Franco Valussi (clarinet, vocals); Steve Andrews (tenor, baritone, clarinet); Roly Veitch (guitar, vocals); Roy Cansdale (double bass) + Neville Sarony (vocals)
(Review by Russell).
The Reunion is an annual event, it's a band, a gathering of friends playing a few jazz numbers in the lounge of the Black Bull public house in Blaydon. If no one turned up it wouldn't matter too much as the musicians on the stand would play for their own pleasure. 

They come from all parts...Cumbria, Worcestershire, far away Hong Kong and downtown Winlaton - that's the band. In the main, Blaydon Jazz Club's audience is drawn from the Tyneside area, however, for this annual get together a large contingent of fans make the trip all the way from Hong Kong! Trumpeter Colin Aitchison, born in North Shields, long-since resident in Hong Kong, returns to Tyneside year after year and a planeload of supporters exchange Ned Kelly's, Kowloon's famous jazz venue, for the equally famous Blaydon Jazz Club. The band's classy Italian clarinettist Franco Valussi, another Hong Kong-based musician, looks forward to renewing acquaintance with fellow reedsman Steve Andrews and the rhythm section boys, eschewing the spotlight - Roly Veitch, guitar, and bassist Roy Cansdale - purr like contented cats.

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Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

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Whilst we appreciate the many emails, texts, messages and other communications we receive requesting album/gig reviews on BSH, regrettably, we are unable to reply to all of them other than those we are able to answer with a positive response.
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