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Bebop Spoken There

Ben Williams: "Jaco [Pastorius] is almost like the Charlie Parker of the bass." - (DownBeat November 2018).

Dana Hall: "My philosophy is that everyone in the band is a drummer." - (DownBeat November 2018.)

Today Monday October 22

Afternoon.

Jazz in the Afternoon - Cullercoats Crescent Club, 1 Hudleston, Cullercoats NE30 4QS. Tel: 0191 253 0242. 1:00pm. Free.

Evening

?????

To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Thursday, June 07, 2018

DJazz: The Durham City Jazz Festival: Haircut, Wash & Dry - June 3

(Review by Russell)
One of the attractions of DJazz is the use of quirky Durham City locations as festival venues. The unexpected and unusual spark interest; Durham Castle, for example, Empty Shop is anything but empty and disused, and then there is a barber’s shop and a launderette. Sunday’s schedule at the festival hub in Fowler’s Yard ran from noon ’til late with some choosing to base themselves there for the duration. Others, including your BSH correspondent, attempted to catch performances, or part performances, at other venues. This meant departing midway through Niffi Osiyemi’s set with the firm intention of returning to catch some of Stu Collingwood’s set (see Fowler’s Yard review).

A stroll over Framwellgate Bridge, up North Road, turn into Neville Street and a few doors up the festival’s smallest venue was open for business. The Barber of Neville offers a haircut, of course,   art on the walls (printmaker Anja Percival), and a bar. During DJazz there is jazz at the Barber of Neville. It isn’t the biggest space – a duo, trio at best – and on the final day of this year’s sold out festival John Pope and Faye MacCalman set up in the shop window to play two short sets.
Sporting a crew cut, double bassist John Pope would later pay a visit to the launderette – more on that later – but for now he stood alongside Faye MacCalman (tenor sax and clarinet) to play a few numbers by some of their favourite composers including Billy Bang’s Nothing But Love, JuJu from Wayne Shorter’s all-star 60s outfit, and the title track from Thelonious Monk’s 1962 album Monk’s Dream. The interval provided an opportunity to slip away and head over to Empty Shop to catch a set by the Durham University Jazz Soc Septet. A review will follow, however, it seems sensible to skip ahead to Alan Glen’s Old Cinema Launderette gig because John Pope was also on that gig!

Hot foot from the barbershop. John Pope teamed up once again with Paul Wight to support pianist Alan Glen at the Old Cinema Launderette in Gilesgate Moor. BSH caught up with Maestro Glen at the midway point in the cycle. Sorry! The venue is a working launderette (see photo…Daz, Persil!), although on the evening no one was washing their smalls, during the day customers sit in front of the machines, this evening they were sitting right in front of Messrs Glen, Pope and Wight. ‘Hello’ to Paul Wight, and ‘hello’ to Alan Glen. JP was out front taking the air.

The second set: typical Glen, no announcements, simply play the tune and let the music (modern jazz) speak for itself. Fresh from his earlier duo gig, JP focused on Glen’s setlist, drummer Wight excelled in his use of brushes (at a lick when called upon), the bass and drums partnership more than up to the job of accompanying Alan Glen. Someday My Prince Will Come, Rollin’ Sid and All Blues were at the heart of a fine performance and at the end of the cycle, sorry, evening, the Old Cinema Launderette patrons showed their appreciation.   
Russell

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Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

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Whilst we appreciate the many emails, texts, messages and other communications we receive requesting album/gig reviews on BSH, regrettably, we are unable to reply to all of them other than those we are able to answer with a positive response.
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