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Number 22 in World Jazz Blog Rankings

Number 22 in World Jazz Blog Rankings

Bebop Spoken There

Alan Luff: “The general view is that Ella’s songbook recordings are the supreme exemplars of sophistication, fine diction and creative voice in the wide field of popular music.” – (Jazz Journal May 2017).

Steve Voce: “Most of us have been crashed into by cretins who walk along the road absorbed in the screens of their mobile phones.” – (Jazz Journal May 2017).

Today Wednesday May 24

Afternoon.
Vieux Carre Jazzmen - Crescent Club, 1 Hudleston, Cullercoats NE30 3OS. 1pm. Free.
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Evening.
Take it to the Bridge - The Globe, 11 Railway St., Newcastle NE4 7AD. £1. 8pm.
Levee Ramblers NOJB - Springwell Village Community Venue, Fell Road, Springwell, Gateshead NE9 7RP. 8:30pm. £3.00.
Chris Sharkey Trio - Jazz Café, 25 Pink Lane, Newcastle NE1 5DW. 8pm. £5.
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To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Tuesday, January 31, 2017

CD Review: Josh Green & The Cyborg Orchestra - Telepathy & Bop

 (Review by Dave Brownlow)
An attempt by Josh Green and his Cyborg Orchestra to blend together modern jazz with contemporary classical music using surreal visual art and cinematic and television images as inspirations in a quirky, humorous style. Green has assembled a band comprising 3 reeds, 2 brass, 2 strings, accordion, guitar, piano, bass, and drums together with a conventional classical String Quartet and uses the instrumentation in an unconventional way in a striking and very different, off-centre sound. He’s studied jazz, classical music and composed film soundtracks and music for award-winning TV shows. The reviewer Ted Nash writes “Josh Green’s music is full of surprises and left me smiling. It is evocative and playful and certainly does not ‘fit in a box’. Mr Green has found a truly original voice.”

Monday, January 30, 2017

The Halcyon - ITV 9pm.

The Halcyon is now well into its 8 episode run. The bombs are dropping, the inter-relations between staff, guests and management are developing but, the best bits are, apart from Olivia Williams whom I adore - her aristocratic snobbery personifies the period - is, the brief snatches of the 'Sonny Sullivan' Band with singer Keira Tointon. Original tunes, that don't sound like originals, provide the 1940's feeling.
In tonight's episode, Jamie Cullum shows as a wedding singer.
Lance.

Sage Gateshead on Sunday - The Cole Porter Songbook

(Press release)
Royal Northern Sinfonia
Soloists: Anna O’Byrne, Caroline Sheen, David Thaxton, Jon Boydon
Conductor: Roderick Dunk

RNS celebrates the genius of Cole Porter! Join us for an enchanting matinee of songs from classic musicals Kiss me Kate, High Society and Anything Goes alongside timeless hits I get a kick out of you, I’ve Got You Under My Skin, and Night and Day.

Sunday, January 29, 2017

New Year New Artists @Sage Gateshead. January 29 Saturday Afternoon Session

(Review by Steve T)
The Elliott Galvin Trio was the main attraction for the Jazz fan. I'm a self-confessed philistine when it comes to piano trios but there's been a definite move towards equal weight for each musician in recent years. I vaguely recall similar claims when I first started listening to 'real' Jazz in the early eighties but I still remember relentless bass solos, so maybe it's like the folk revival. On the other hand, in bands like Bad Plus, GoGo Penguin and these, maybe it's really starting to happen.

Jazz Latin Groove @ The Globe: January 28














Debra Milne (vocals); Steve Summers (sax); Alan Law (piano); Katy Trigger (bass); Nik Alevroyiannis (drums).
(Review by Ann Alex/Photos courtesy of Ken Drew)
It felt as if we were in sunny climes, not in cold Newcastle, as the band seemed to transport us abroad by way of bossa nova, bolero, the tunes of Horace Silver, Jobim, Chic Corea and even Stevie Wonder.
It all began with One Note Samba, a clever set of lyrics about coming back to that one note and also to ‘you’, right through to such songs as Little Sunflower; Afro Blue; 500 Miles High; Sting’s Consider Me Gone; Senor Blues; Corcovado; Spooky; Temptation (Tom Waits) and a couple of songs in Spanish. And each song performed by Debra with sweet-voiced rhythm, and superb solos from each band member.

John Le Carré; Count Basie & Credo














(A day in the life of Lance).
Saturday afternoon I popped into our local Marie Curie shop on the off chance I'd find something worth reading. Bingo! John Le Carré's first George Smiley novel Call For the Dead.
Well worth a pound.
Usually, I avoid the CD shelf - I've enough of them awaiting review without buying discs that I want to listen to for pleasure. However, as I'd once found a Marian McPartland CD here, I did give them a cursory glance and, what did I find? Basie in London!

Mark Pringle / Tom Syson Duo @ The Jazz Cafe January 26

(Review by Steve H/Photo courtesy of Mike Tilley)
Friday nights at the Jazz Cafe have become a bit of thing this year. For the fourth consecutive week, a packed yet wonderfully attentive house enjoyed a great evening. This week differed from previous weeks in that rather than local musicians we were treated to a much acclaimed out of town duo. Award winning pianist Mark Pringle and up and coming star trumpeter Tom Syson had driven from Bedford that day and were indeed travelling straight back after the gig. Hopefully, the guys thought the arduous road trip was as worthwhile as the highly appreciative audience.

Saturday, January 28, 2017

Globe Gig News

There are some great jazz gigs coming up at the Globe in February and March featuring local and visiting musicians. And ... students get in free!
During February and March, Jazz Coop are offering students free admission to ticketed gigs at the Globe. This applies to all jazz gigs and most other gigs.
One of the aims of Jazz.Coop is to grow the audience for jazz and that means encouraging more young people to come to live jazz. The free entry for students offer is for a trial period. If it is successful it will be extended. 
Lance.

CD Review: The Baylor Project - The Journey

(Review by Ann Alex)
I have struck lucky with the last 2 CDs I’ve reviewed as they’ve both been full of lively, interesting tracks, with unusual song choices and arrangements, not a moment’s boredom. This debut CD was the idea of husband and wife Jean and Marcus Baylor, who are both the offspring of pastors, so have musical roots in the American church, with influences of gospel, blues, soul and jazz. Marcus is a world-class drummer and Jean has a clear mezzo-soprano voice, with a pure tone and flexible timing. The aim of this innovative, collaborative project was to create spiritual, buoyant feel-good music. There are original songs, jazz standards, soul influenced tracks, and even a hymn.

CD Review: Mark Whitfield - Grace

Mark Whitfield (guitar); Davis Whitfield (piano); Mark Whitfield Jr., (drums); Yasushi Nakamura (bass); + Sy Smith (vocal on 1 track)
(Review by Lance).
A family band. Papa Mark, acclaimed in 1990 by the New York Times as The Best Young Guitarist in the Business, brings his two sons into the studio for a pleasing album that doesn't push any boundaries but lets us know that pedalboards aren't as important to a guitarist as a plectrum, a footstool and an ability to swing whatever the idiom.

Friday, January 27, 2017

Mark Williams & Joel McCullough @ The Lit & Phil. January 27

Mark Williams (guitar) & Joel McCullough (guitar)
(Review by Russell/photo courtesy of Brian Ebbatson.)
Walking past St John’s Church on the way to the Lit & Phil a feathered friend left a large deposit on your reviewer’s head. Splat! Such an occurrence is said to bring good luck, so, make a note of the winning numbers on this weekend’s Lottery…4, 23, 24, 37, 42 and…onto more important matters.
On this bitterly cold January day, a good number of folk defied the elements, keen to hear some top quality jazz. Today’s lunchtime concert featured two fine guitarists – Mark Williams and Joel Byrne-McCullough. The Irishmen, friends from way back studied together in Newcastle on the BMus Jazz course, went their separate ways, recently reuniting as a working duo when McCullough decided to make his home in the region. Williams has been a welcome figure on the local scene for some time and now his fellow countryman is making his mark. 
Nine tunes in one hour, a jazz guitar treat.

Book Review: P.C. Dettmann - Ernest Zevon

Ernest Zevon is a singer, pianist, drug dealer and user, alcoholic, gambler and a loser. Ironically, gambling is one of those failings where he occasionally wins, although not without cost. He's a combination of just about everyone we've ever met who fell into any one of the above categories. I doubt if any of us has met anyone who ticked all the boxes. Ernest does!

Thursday, January 26, 2017

Bill Shaw's Comic Gallery.


Readers will recall the sadness many of us felt at the passing of drummer/cartoonist Bill Shaw on August 29 last year. Steve Hanford, with the approval of Mary Shaw and family, has compiled an ebook of some of Bill's cartoons which can be previewed and purchased here. All proceeds will go to Cancer Research UK.
Link.
A fitting tribute to a fine man and a good friend.
Lance

CD Review: Mosaic – Subterranea

Ralph Wyld (vibraphone), James Copus (trumpet & flugelhorn), Sam Rapley (clarinet & bass clarinet), Cecilia Bignall (cello), Misha Mullov-Abbado (double bass) & Scott Chapman (drums & percussion)
(Review by Russell)
A graduate of the Royal Academy of Music, Ralph Wyld has toured widely with Mosaic and worked as a sideman in several other bands. The release of this debut CD as a leader is an opportunity for Wyld to present his own compositions to an album-buying public. All tracks on Subterranea (seven of them, of which two are ‘interludes’) are written by Wyld and they are interpreted by musicians of his own generation, themselves forging distinctive careers in an increasingly crowded talent pool of British music school graduates seeking to make their mark.

CD Review: The Scottish National Jazz Orchestra with Bill Evans - Beauty & the Beast

Part 1: After a Kentonesque intro (had Kenton still been around) Bill Evans, who isn't a reincarnated pianist nor an aka Yusef Lateef, erupts on soprano. This is definitely the beast.
Part 2: A change from major to minor mood suggests that the beast is eying up a young lady who has entered his castle. The mood now is Ellington/Mingus and Evans is both beauty and beast as the scene changes. Even if this had been called Fish and Chips it would still have been one magnificent piece of writing and playing. Oh dear, I think the young woman is in turmoil - where is daddy?

Wednesday, January 25, 2017

CD Review: Trish Clowes – My Iris

Trish Clowes (tenor saxophone), Chris Montague (guitar), Ross Stanley (piano & Hammond organ) & James Maddren (drums)
(Review by Russell).
My Iris comprises eight tracks, of which all but one are written by Trish Clowes. A first recording for this stellar group of musicians it is the tenor saxophonist’s fourth album on Basho Records. Iris, the messenger of Greek and Roman gods, Clowes, delivering her musical message; fluent tenor, three compatriots – Chris Montague, Ross Stanley and James Maddren – receiving and responding to it in masterful fashion.

CD Review: Henry Spencer and Juncture – The Reasons Don’t Change

(Review by Russell)
Henry Spencer and Juncture met as students at the Guildhall School of Music. Trumpeter Spencer plays with precision and passion – a winning combination. Bold, uninhibited, the opening track, one of ten – Introduction / Hindsight Can Wait – bristles with an energy one associates with the concert hall platform, Spencer, with steely nerve projecting to the upper circle and beyond.

Preview for New Year New Artists @ Sage this Saturday January 28.

There's an awful lot of music on offer this weekend for your hard earned cash, especially anyone whose up for a wide range of styles. The main attraction for the Jazz lover is the piano trio of Elliott Galvin, featuring Tom McCredie on bass and extraordinary percussionist Corrie Dick, who played Sage Two with Laura Jurd last year and brought his own band to the Bridge in Newcastle recently. Keith Jarrett and Stravinsky are cited as influences.  
The other attractions include a sitar player and a female singer/songwriter who played the SummerTyne Americana Festival last year - described as 'Southern gothic alt-country blues.'

Tuesday, January 24, 2017

Going Dutch @ The Lit & Phil (afternoon session) - January 22

(Review/photos courtesy of Ken Drew)
The expectations of this Dutch All-Dayer had been well and truly set the previous evening at the Jazz Café – what a Taster that was!
Now for the programme proper.  The format ran as 3 sets, each with one established group of players preceded by a new grouping.

Going Dutch @ The Lit & Phil (evening session) - January 22

(Review by Steve H/photo courtesy of Ken Drew)
The evening comprised of 3 sets; each with one established act and one brand new grouping.  Kicking off the first set was a quartet featuring Ab Baars on Sax, Olie Brice on bass, Jasper Stadhouders on guitar and Martin Von Duynhoven on drums who produced an interesting improvised piece. Kaya Drakslar then performed an amazing contemporary, improvised offering on the grand piano which began with what appeared to be the sound of church bells ringing and ended with the amplified rustling of paper blowing in a gale. On inspection of the piano afterward, one could see how things had been set up with the inside of the piano covered in bells, magnets, pegs, paper etc. The performance was quite mesmerising and hypnotic and was warmly appreciated by all present.

Dutch Treat @ The Jazz Cafe January 21.

(Review by Steve H/photo courtesy of Ken Drew).
Not since AZ Alkmaar played a UEFA Cup tie at St James Park in 2007 had so many Dutch players assembled in Newcastle. The assembled 11 consisted of 9 musicians who practise their trade in the Netherlands accompanied by 2 guest players from the UK - bass player Ollie Brice and Newcastle’s very own Faye MacCalman. Saturday night’s team at the Jazz Cafe would have proved a match for anybody. Billed somewhat erroneously as a revival of the music of Sean Bergin and Chris McGregor,(exiles from apartheid South Africa who settled respectively in Amsterdam and London) this gig was a fantastic taster for Jazz North East’s ‘Going Dutch’ all dayer at the Lit and Phil the following day. 

Monday, January 23, 2017

Memorabilia


Vintage wartime programs from Colin Aitchison. Note the presence of Art Pepper on the Swing Shop Bill. He mentions the concert in his autobiography Straight Life.
Fascinating!
Lance.



Budtet @ The Globe Jazz Bar - January 21

Stuart Finden (tenor sax), Fiona Finden (vocal, soprano sax), Jude Murphy (vocal, alto sax), Lin Lee Wong (piano), Jim Crinson (bass), Eric Stutt (drums).+ Dave Weisser (cornet/vocal).
(Review by Steve T/photos courtesy of Stu Finden). 
If Friday night was about 'serious' Jazz, tonight's Jazz Coop gig was about having fun. That's not intended as a derogatory statement, alongside the standard quintet, imbibing and Chinese food, having fun is one of my favourite things.
The  Message and Stu’s Bloos led to Four on Sixa Wes Montgomery piece with lyrics by Fiona Finden, who sang and played un-straightened soprano sax.

Sunday, January 22, 2017

CD Review:Tommy Smith Youth Jazz Orchestra - Efferevescence

Youth Jazz Orchestra no longer conjures up images of well-intentioned youngsters vainly attempting to emulate their peers. Quite the contrary. Like NYJO and many of the bands who will compete in this year's Sunderland Big Band Festival (March 3-5 at Chester le Street) the YJOs are of a standard where they can hold their own with just about any of the more seasoned performers. This is due, of course, to the ability of some of those seasoned performers to pass on their wisdom to the emerging talents. In the case of the TSYJO there can be few better equipped to bring out the best in a band than Tommy Smith. Equally at home with the internationally acclaimed Scottish National Jazz Orchestra, or a small band, or a symphony orchestra, Smith can do the business. On this third album by the TSYJO tribute is paid to some vintage numbers and some fresh interpretations of more contemporary jazz classics.

Graeme Wilson Quintet @ Opus 4, Travellers Rest, Darlington January 20.

Noel Dennis (trumpet, flugelhorn), Graeme Wilson (tenor sax), Paul Edis (piano), Mick Shoulder (bass), Adam Sinclair (drums).
(Review by Steve T)
That great Modern Jazz warhorse, from bebop pioneers Bird and Diz and Bird and Miles, through Miles and Trane and Miles and Wayne and a timely return to Darlo with Noel and Graeme. To these ears, nothing in Jazz can quite match the standard quintet.
An enthusiastic crowd of around thirty knew these musicians well but were almost entirely the senior male end, which is a shame cos a relative youngster and a relatively young couple turned up and clearly got it. Another chap told me his missus was supposed to come but then couldn't, which is a shame cos you know she'd have got it too. Hasn't anybody told the young people of Darlo that Jazz is cool again, like it ever wasn't?

Saturday, January 21, 2017

RIP Terry Cryer

The death of photographer Terry Cryer on January 15 serves as a sharp reminder of the importance of photographs, not only in jazz but in anything. We have our albums and suitcases full of them but, will the digital images captured on mobile phones be retained for posterity? I remember the delight I felt when I discovered some black and white negs, up in the loft, from various jazz concerts in the 1980s that I thought had been lost forever. That they hadn't stood the test of time as I'd have liked them to is neither here nor there. At least I still had them.

Triggerlawross @ The Jazz Café. Jan 20 - and a wedding...

Alan Law (piano), Katy Trigger (bass) & Matti Ross (drums)
A third successive Friday evening gig at Newcastle’s Jazz Café to attract an attentive full house.  The trio’s name suggests a lumbering beast, perhaps grazing on swampland vegetation, a king beast ruling the primordial roost. Triggerlawross is/are pianist Alan Law, eschewing the upright, favouring his keyboard, face-on to in-the-pocket bassist Katy Trigger and tight-ass drummer Matti Ross.
Several musicians were in the house checking out this developing project. Original material – the names of which seemingly of little importance to the trio – focused upon the groove. A constantly changing soundscape, eye contact determining a change in tempi, Trigger laying down killer riffs, Ross inventing patterns, discarding one for another, then another, Law finding choice chords and taking off on improvisatory flights…this Triggerlawross could fly!

Friday, January 20, 2017

Washington and Donald Swing

Here's the update on the music for Donald and Melania's first dance at the inauguration ball.
The opening number is said to going to be My Way. When the Sinatra family was asked if that would be okay, Nancy Sinatra replied (I'm told) 'Sure, just remember the first line' - And now, the end is near...
Abe Lincoln.

CD Review: Miguel Zenon - Tipico

Miguel Zenon (alto); Luis Perdomo (piano); Hand Glawischnig (bass); Henry Cole (drums).
(Review by Lance).
One hell of an alto player! This was my first thought as Zenon soared through the changes of the opener - Academia. A tune, seemingly, inspired by his tutorial role at the New England Conservatory. After hearing this, his students will either change direction and become librarians on Rhode Island or, with much diligence, eventually, become headliners at Birdland.

CD Review: Audrey Silver - Very Early

Audrey Silver (vocals); Bruce Barth (piano); Paul Beaudry (bass); Lewis Nash (drums); Alex Pope Norris (trumpet); Gary Versace (accordion); Ron Affif (guitar); Tom Beckham (vibes)
(Review by Ann Alex)
One of the best things about this enjoyable CD is the interesting choice of songs. I haven’t previously come across any of them on a jazz CD: there are 2 by Audrey Silver herself, songs by Sting, Declan O’Rourke, a song in French, 2 songs with lyrics by poets, and also 2 songs from musicals which aren’t usually done by jazz singers (Surrey With The Fringe On Top and Getting To Know You). And the style is unmistakably jazzlike, vocals with clear diction in a pleasing alto voice and lots of space for instrumental soloing. Not so much once through the chorus, then solos, but rather a piano and vocal lead, followed by the other instruments contributing at various parts of the songs. The accordion, guitar, trumpet and vibes are not on every track, but are used wisely where appropriate. 

Thursday, January 19, 2017

Songbook - The Performers, Band Leaders, Arrangers, Instrumentalists & Vocalists

That indefatigable GASbook devotee, Ron Guarienti has sent news of his latest course (see heading). This takes place on the weekend of June\ 16 - 18 at Higham Hall College, Bassenthwaite Lake, Cockermouth, Cumbria CA13 9SH.
Ron describes the course:
"Performers were there to 'sell songs'. Yet the unique talents of the best stylists delivered much more - some of the most glorious music of the twentieth century drawing from musical theatre, folk and nineteenth-century musical traditions - they left a songbook for all time."
For more details phone 01768 776276 or visit www.highamhall.com.
It sounds great and taking place in an idyllic setting In the Good Old Summertime.
Lance.

Wednesday, January 18, 2017

Moonlighting Season 2 Episode 4 The Dream Sequence Always Rings Twice

CD Review: Benedikt Jahnel Trio – Invariant

Benedikt Jahnel – piano; Antonio Miguel – double bass; Owen Howard – drums
(CD Review by Hugh C)
This truly international trio comprising Jahnel (Germany), Miguel (Spain) and Howard (Canada) have been playing together for ten years.  This album, The Invariant, is so named in recognition of the continuity of their musical partnership.  The music is all composed by Benedikt Jahnel.  The content of this CD represents a distillation of material played in the live setting and developed there and in the studio to incorporate the dynamic responses of his trio partners.

Jazz Café Jam Session - January 17.

 (Review by Lance).
The first Jazz Café jam of 2017 began low key with guitarist Mark Williams at the helm in place of the, so we thought, still cruising Pete Gilligan. Lovingly caressing his recently acquired Heritage guitar, Mark set the mood with Out of Nowhere, I Love You and I Remember Clifford. With Morgan and Grainger providing solid support, the scene was set for the big hitters in the room to stand up and be counted.
First to show was Pete Tanton of SSBB and the Riviera Quartet. Pete, blowing open horn, did justice to Four and Bye Bye Blackbird. But, why have one trumpet when you can have two? Ray Johnson came down from the hills and the two brassmen had a friendly joust on There Will Never be Another You.

Tuesday, January 17, 2017

CD Review: John Abercrombie Quartet – Up and Coming

(Review by Hugh C)
John Abercrombie – guitar; Marc Copland – piano; Drew Gress – double bass; Joey  Baron – drums.
Up and Coming is the second album by the quartet.  Abercrombie, Gress and Baron have had a long association, Marc Copland joined the three for their first quartet recording in 2013. 
The first four tracks Joy – Flipside – Sunday School – Up and Coming are all by Abercrombie.  The album as a whole has a laid-back, free-flowing groove engendered by Abercrombie's relaxed guitar style.  By his own admission “I play less fast than I used to, less 'technical'”.  His partners respond to this with a gentle exploration of the quieter aspects of their respective instruments.  

Monday, January 16, 2017

Stumblin'

Just stumbled across this almost by accident so for anybody not so lucky, Graeme Wilson is bringing a quintet - that's right a quintet - to Darlo on Friday night. For anybody in the south of the region, this should be unmissable.
I saw his quartet twice last year and both could easily have been in my best gigs of the year. They stole the Festival at Burton Agnis and were knocking at the door of the formidable QCBA Quartet at Ilkley.
Alongside Lord Paul Edis, Mick Shoulder and Adam Sinclair he's joined by trumpet master Noel Dennis who played an excellent set here with his own quintet last year. This is a standard quintet, that perfect creation which is still all too rare in the North East. Gotta do it when you get the chance. 
Steve T.

Sunday, January 15, 2017

Jazz Café Press Release

A busy and varied programme next week at The Jazz Cafe with the return of a long-established regular event on Tuesday, a unique one-off on Saturday and a Cafe debut for a re-named Tyneside trio on Friday. In the following week, on the 27th, look out for the return of award-winning pianist Mark Pringle, not with his trio but with trumpet playing partner Tom Syson. Unusually for one of our duos this one is on a short national tour, their next stop after The Cafe being the Royal Festival Hall on London's South Bank.

Saturday, January 14, 2017

The Whisky Glass Blues - Scott Black & Red Pellini Tenor Sax & The Chin...

James (The Mesmeriser) Harrison & Friends. Saltburn Jazz Club. January 13

Film review: La La Land

(Review by Russell)
A fifties Technicolor look to it, a ‘Golden Age’ Hollywood musical soundtrack, Damien Chazelle’s La La Land is nailed-on to triumph at this year’ Oscars. Co-stars Ryan Gosling and Emma Stone are a perfect match: jazz pianist Sebastian and aspiring Hollywood star Mia fall in love, dreaming of fame and fortune. Sebastian plays piano in LA’s cocktail lounges, longing to play jazz, to run a jazz club. In between auditions Mia works in a diner, despairing of ever getting a break.

Friday, January 13, 2017

Alan Glen Trio @ The Globe Jazz Bar - January 12.

Alan Glen (piano); John Pope (bass); Sid White (drums).
(Review by Lance).
Coldest night of the year, snow, tidal surges and strong winds forecast. The heating in the downstairs bar had also failed. What else could go wrong?
Nothing!
Not with the Alan Glen Trio playing in the upper room - the temperature seemed fine up there.
Must have been the music.
The Glen Trio can warm up any room!

Thursday, January 12, 2017

Tonight @ The Globe.

Tonight is an unmissable night at the Globe where the Jazz Coop present the Alan Glen Trio. Maestro Glen on piano, Pope, John on double bass and Sid White, depping for Paul Wight, on drums (or is it vice versa?) Whatever, an evening guaranteed to please just about everyone who likes to hear a great, ever-swinging, trio.
Lance.

Nothing unlucky about being in Saltburn on Friday the 13th!

John Nesbitt, our roving videographer down in the Tees delta, sent me this filmed clip of James Harrison and Friends playing All Blues at the Queen Catherine Hotel, Osmotherly. North Yorkshire.
Featured are James Harrison (keys); Danny Allen (alto); Paul Donnelly  (guitar); Anth Ord (bass) and Tom Chapman (drums).
It was actually filmed in November 2014 but, as James and his friends are playing at Saltburn tomorrow night [Friday, January 13] John thought it may be worth posting. At Saltburn, Lloyd Wright replaces Paul Donnelly.
Lance.

New Kid on the Block.

Just before Xmas, I had a phone call from a guy called Bob Wade. Bob and his wife Jill are retiring to live and settle back in the UK after many years in South Africa where he was one of their top trumpet players. On Saturday night he had his first blow in the UK, with Rendezvous Jazz at the Piper. Yesterday, Bob guested with the Vieux Carré Jazzmen at Cullercoats, even doubling up with Miles Watson at one stage. Note the photo - an 8 piece line-up! I'm sure we will hear from Bob at lots of local venues in the near future. Well worth turning out for and a great addition to the NE jazz scene.
John Taylor.

Wednesday, January 11, 2017

Jazz Record Requests Returns to Sage Gateshead

Advance notice for JRR from Sage Gateshead: The BBC Radio 3 Freethinking Festival visits Sage Gateshead again 17th to 19th March 2017.  Details are sparse but promised here.  On JRR last Saturday, Alyn Shipton announced that JRR will be broadcast live from Sage Gateshead on Saturday 18th March and he invited requests pertinent to the theme of the festival "The speed of life and how we experience the passage of time"  As before requesters are welcome to introduce their request in person.  (All this can be heard at 31:16 here).

Death of a Legend. RIP Buddy Greco (August 14, 1926 - January 10, 2017)

Buddy Greco died yesterday.
Although he was 90, it seemed he would go on forever. A vocalist who could hold his head high alongside Sinatra, Tormé and Bennett he was also an outstanding pianist who, as a teenager, held down the piano chair with Benny Goodman.
It was when I purchased a record by the Goodman Sextet that I first encountered him. This was Benny's bop band and the tune was In the Land of Oo-Bla-Dee with Wardell Gray on tenor and Buddy on piano and vocals.
From then on I was hooked, buying the 45's Lady is a Tramp and Around the World as well as, among others, the LP Live at Mr. Kelly's. An album comparable with the best of any by his contemporaries. Apart from a choice selection of standards, there's a swinging instrumental duo feature reminiscent of Nat Cole.

Tuesday, January 10, 2017

Nat Hentoff (June 10, 1925 - January 7, 2017)

Maurice Summerfield has informed me, via info received from Phyllis Kessel, that Nat Hentoff has died.
Hentoff was many things in his life and a lot of them were political which, being an American, isn't surprising. 
For us 'over here' he was the man who, in conjunction with Nat Shapiro, wrote what many consider to be the first truly great and authentic book on jazz. Hear Me Talkin' To Ya. Probably the first book where a knowledgeable pair of enthusiasts got out there and spoke to the men who made the music. The men who laid the foundation for every riff or solo played today or tomorrow. Even now, over 60 years later, it is still compelling reading. I could use just about every page as material for our Bebop Spoken There section, and I'm often tempted, but that would be like a crib.
The fact is that Hentoff had an acute perception on, not just jazz, but life.
Nat Hentoff died on January 7, aged 91.
Rest In Peace - your legacy will remain.
Nat Hentoff.
Lance.

Full Marks To Caffè Nero At South Shields ...

For playing jazz today as the background music in their South Shields (King Street) branch, and at a sensible volume, not too intrusive but loud enough for my enjoyment.  We were treated to a Dave Brubeck number, from Time Out I think, one of those tunes with an odd time signature where each line of music seems intriguingly not quite complete. Then came various jazz standards by various vocalists, including East Of The Sun and What Is This Thing Called Love.
I’ve noticed their music choices before, which have included quality rock music such as Joni Mitchell, so if anyone from Caffè Nero is reading this, please keep it up!
Ann Alex

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About this blog - contact details.

Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

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