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Bebop Spoken There

Dave Gelly: “From 1 January 1920, when prohibition was imposed in the US, people didn’t stop drinking, they just stopped drinking legally.” – (Jazz Journal October 2017).

Regina Carter: “When I was a teenager, I would daydream about going out on a date and dancing to Ella’s music.” (Down Beat October 2017).

Today Tuesday November 21

Afternoon

Classic Swing - The Ship, Front St., Monkseaton NE25 8DP. 1pm. Free. New weekly mainstream session. 2 mins from Monkseaton metro.
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Evening

Jam session - Jazz Café, 25 Pink Lane, Newcastle NE1 5DW. 0191 222 9882. 8:00pm Free. Session led by Mark Williams.

Omar Sosa + Seckou Keita - Sage Gateshead, St Mary’s Square, Gateshead NE8 2JR. 0191 443 4666. 8:00pm. £21.80. Sage Two.

Gypsy Jazz Jam - Prohibition Bar, Arch 3, Brandling Street, Gateshead NE8 2BA. Doors 7:00pm. Free. ‘No audience as such – everyone is a player/musician or a gypsy!’

Charles Gordon - Vermont Hotel, Castle Garth, Newcastle NE1 1RQ. 0191 233 1010. 10:00pm. Free.

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To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Monday, November 13, 2017

Strictly Smokin’ Big Band @ Seven Arts - November 12

(Review by Russell)
The Strictly Smokin’ Big Band rocked up at 31a Harrowgate Road in the Chapel Allerton suburb of Leeds to play an afternoon engagement at Seven Arts. MD Michael Lamb called upon his A-listers and, with just three deps drafted in, Tyneside’s finest nineteen piece big band was ready to roll. As Seven Jazz regulars arrived for their weekly Sunday afternoon gig the word on the door was that a handful of tickets, no more, remained on sale.
Half an hour before the advertised start the ‘house full’ signs went up with some disappointed fans being told that they could be admitted during the interval if one or two people decided not to return for the second set. Fat chance! The band assembled on stage in the tiered seating auditorium and wasted no time in hitting ’em for six with the Buddy Rich take on Mexicali Nose. An opportune time to name check depping drummer Tom Hawthorn. Leeds College of Music graduate, working with a slew of top class outfits – Portmanteau and Tom Sharp to name but two – Hawthorn’s performance was nothing short of brilliant having received in advance of the gig one or two of the ‘more difficult’ charts, otherwise, he read the dots on the day. And on the subject of deps…the other two – pianist Dean Stockdale, and Tim Hurst, trombone – were more than up to the job.

Chris Walden’s Film Noir Suite has been in the pad for a while and here at Seven Arts the band got to play all three parts. David Barnes’ trombone solo the centerpiece of Part One, Part Two’s three-flute intro (Jamie Toms, Steve Summers, Keith Robinson), and a most lyrical trumpet solo from the genial American ex-pat Pete Tanton, set up Part Three featuring a killer drum ‘n’ bass riff leading to Robinson’s alto ripping the roof off the place. Earlier vocalist F’reez had softened them up with the  Pocket Song. A Yorkshireman sitting to your reviewer’s left was hearing the Strictly Smokin’ for the first time unaware that the SSBB had yet to play its ace card. From the shadows into the spotlight, please welcome…Ms Alice Grace! The fabulous Alice Grace. Game, set and match! Honeysuckle Rose with Michael Whent’s sensitive bass accompaniment, then the killer ‘get out of here’ moment, Grace singing Lush Life with first-class piano accompaniment and Jamie Tom’s superb tenor solo.  

The SSBB is increasingly looking beyond the tried and tested, trying and testing charts by the likes of Adam Bartczak (Greta’s Groove, Grass is Greener) and Tom Garling (Song for AEG). Swing? – the SSBB certainly does, but newer material is key to maintaining the interest of the audience and within the band’s sections.

F’reez insisted I’m a Shy Guy, later confessing to Gamblin' Man Blues. In a slightly comic moment, depping ’bone man Tim Hurst almost missed his cue as Ms Grace sang, with a sparkle in her eye, Hard Hearted Hannah. Hurst leapt to his feet, acquitting himself well with a bold ‘n’ brassy solo. Two full sets, the first exceeding an hour, afforded MD Michael Lamb the luxury of a surfeit of tunes at his fingertips; Chris Walden’s Arturo, Tom Kubis’ On Purple Porpoise Parkway, Bill Ashton of NYJO fame contributed Heat of the Moment (Grace’s vocals) and Dave Slonaker’s Intrada. Dave Slonaker calls up members of the Big Phat Band and plays gigs at the Lighthouse, Hermosa Beach – that’s an indication of the quality of material in the SSBB’s pad. The trumpet section is more than a match for most, and Tom Hill, once again playing section lead, nailed it time and again, receiving,  at one point, a deserving pat on the back from Gordon Marshall.         

The band’s closing number featured Paul Gowland’s tour de force tenor playing on Body and Soul. A show-stopping number, Gowland acknowledged the applause. Cries of ‘more’ won the band the encore it richly deserved and the audience went on its way singing Jeepers Creepers.
This was a fine performance by the Strictly Smokin’ at a bona fide jazz club. Next stop Ronnies?
Russell                         
Strictly Smokin’ Big Band: Michael Lamb MD, Pete Tanton, Tom Hill, Gordon Marshall trumpets; David Barnes, Mark Ferris, Tim Hurst, John Flood trombones; Jamie Toms, Paul Gowland, Steve Summers (pictured), Keith Robinson, Laurie Rangecroft reeds; Pawel Jedrzejewski guitar; Dean Stockdale piano; Michael Whent bass; Tom Hawthorn drums; Alice Grace vocals; F’reez vocals

1 comment :

Steve Crocker (on F/b) said...

Thanks for the review Lance! Always welcome. (ps we did get everyone in - never turn people away - we're a jazz club after all...!)

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About this blog - contact details.

Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

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