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Bebop Spoken There

Buddy Guy: "My mother said, 'You got flowers for me, give 'em to me now, because I'm not going to smell them when you put 'em on the casket'." - (DownBeat September 2018).

Marty Ashby: "I asked him what his gig was and he said 'I put the scores on the music stands'. I said, 'That's a gig?' And I realised there were four floors of guys like him, who supported some of the finest musicians in the world. But I was a jazz musician, and I was used to playing with some of the finest musicians in the world in front of the New York Public Library for tips. That's when I realised that jazz didn't have the same support system as classical music. - (DownBeat September 2018).

Today Tuesday August 14

Afternoon

Classic Swing - The Ship, Front St., Monkseaton NE25 8DP. 1pm. Free.

Evening

?????

To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Friday, November 24, 2017

Group Theory @ The Jazz Co-op, The Globe, Newcastle - November 23

Dan Garel (alto saxophone); Tom Burgess (guitar); Dylan Purches (bass) & Tristan Bacon (drums)
(Review by Russell)
Group Theory emerged from a jazz hothouse in the heart of Durham city. Durham University and the ever quirky Empty Shop on Framwellgate Bridge are key elements in a burgeoning jazz scene to be found, and heard, in Dunelm House (Students’ Union), the Music Department up on Palace Green, the Gala Theatre, the county-wide Brass Festival, and the new Durham Jazz Festival with its many unusual venues which in its first year included a gig in a barber’s shop.
Earlier this year Group Theory played a superb gig at Newcastle’s Jazz Café and the opportunity to hear the quartet again just along the road at the Jazz Co-op was too good to pass up. Dan Garel is no stranger to the Jazz Café’s bi-monthly jam session and here at the Globe on Railway Street the alto saxophonist (and Group Theory’s composer) played two sets in the company of his old mate, Durham University Big Band drummer, Tristan Bacon, bassist Dylan Purches, and debutant Gibson guitar playing Tom Burgess.

The quartet’s setlist comprised the familiar – Garel’s compositions and a few standards. The select audience observed that Group Theory adhered to the ‘solo-head-solo-fours’ formula, but of interest beyond such strictures were Garel’s razor-sharp alto and Bacon’s frequent injection of hip-hop and drum ’n’ bass grooves. Symmetries (comp. D Garel) and Pumpkin Vermicelli (comp. D Garel) were in the set list earlier in the year and it was great to hear them again. New boy Tom Burgess played the gig seated, without a pick, studious rather than demonstrative. It would appear Tom has rapidly got his head around Dan’s compositional ideas, and perched (no pun intended) on a high bar stool,  bassist Dylan Purches played it straight down the line, unperturbed by Dan’s coruscating alto solos fizzing around the room.          

Garel’s ballad Signal Hill featured Bacon’s sustained brush work and fluent improvisation from the impressive Burgess. The quartet’s senior members, Garel and Bacon, brought in Stella by Starlight ahead of an insistent, urgent alto solo. A short interval, time enough to get to the bar, the choice an easy one; Another bottle of Black Sheep, Keith, thanks.

A new Garel tune with the working title Modal Composition resumed matters, Burgess hitting on a motif, then our altoist taking off once again. A new one, Circling Hours, then the familiar two-mallet, oh-so-slow number, Eight Weeks. Garel likes to play Have You Met Miss Jones? (Bacon doesn’t!), they played it, great stuff! To close this Jazz Co-op engagement, a ‘free groove’ number, possibly titled Free Groove. A slow fuse burner, Burgess impressed, likewise the quartet. Group Theory can be heard again early in the new year at the Jazz Café. Recommended.
Russell                                      

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Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

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