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Bebop Spoken There

Grant Green Jr.: "One thing that most people--especially jazz cats--don't realise is that all of your jazz standards were once pop standards" - DownBeat July 2018).

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Bobby Sanabria: "Tito Puente was not a very tall man, but when he played the timbales he was a giant among men." - DownBeat July 2018).

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Today Monday June 18

Afternoon.

Jazz in the Afternoon - Cullercoats Crescent Club, 1 Hudleston, Cullercoats NE30 4QS. Tel: 0191 253 0242. 1:00pm. Free.

Evening

?????

To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Tuesday, September 19, 2017

Emily Bacon’s Good Time Gang @ The Globe - September 17

Emily Bacon (piano, vocals); Liz Bacon (clarinet); Peter Wright (trumpet); Jeff Milner (trombone, vocals); Sarah Thatcher (banjo, tenor guitar); Spike Kennedy (bass); Paul Bacon (drums)
(Review by Ann Alex)
‘B flat’ said Paul Bacon as I entered the Globe for some lunchtime entertainment. The Old Spinning Wheel In The Parlour was played, good time, danceable, New Orleans music, vintage jazz straight from the jazz history books, but well worth listening to today for its irrepressible tunes and sheer sense of fun. Essay question for music students: ‘Discuss the differences between today’s performance and the bebop style jazz played by the Safe Sextet at the Globe on Thursday.’  Jazz indeed covers a wide spectrum. 
And the band showed an admirable attitude to the music and the audience. They had just returned from a tour of Scotland, but, as Paul Bacon said, ‘It’s just as important to give your all for a small audience as for 250 people.’ So they continued in that vein, foot-tapping solos from woodwind and brass. Tie Me To Your Apron Strings Again, sang the trombonist, followed by Emily, in a light, sweet, voice telling us that she’d be with us in Apple Blossom Time. Ellington’s Mood Indigo, sung with a melancholy feel rather than the gutsy versions done by some singers reminding us that there are many ways to interpret a song, which is what makes singing, and jazz singing in particular, so satisfying.

The band kicked on with High Society and When You Wore A Tulip (a chance for the banjo to shine); Emily hit us with St Louis Blues, sung to a strong steady irresistible beat.
The second set, (or so I thought it was) included Sweethearts on Parade; Sugar Blues (‘one for diabetics,’ said Paul); Emily sang that she intended to Sit Right Down and Write Myself a Letter. She also surprised me with a number I’d always thought of as a country song, Crazy, accompanied just by tenor guitar and occasional clarinet. A marching blues came next, then Celia, which used to be played by the Temperance 7 (remember them?)

The music was chopped into 3 halves (sic), like the Lambton Worm, so we had a surprise third set, including a tune (?) which contained a lovely duet of trombone and clarinet, Emily with Do You Know What It Means To Miss New Orleans and Fair And Square In Love, before the band pulled out all the stops for a good, loud, Weary Blues.

All this was enhanced by the lunchtime menu which, appropriately, consisted of gumbo, and jambalaya as well as ploughman’s lunches. Delicious, and I speak from experience!
Ann Alex

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Whilst we appreciate the many emails, texts, messages and other communications we receive requesting album/gig reviews on BSH, regrettably, we are unable to reply to them all other than those we are able to answer with a positive response.
Similarly, CDs received by post will only be considered if accompanied by sufficient background material.
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Lance

About this blog - contact details.

Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

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