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Bebop Spoken There

Orrin Evans: “I’d like to see a younger audience and an audience that looks more like me at the clubs.” – (Down Beat November 2014).

Kevin Flanagan: "Besides, I'd got sick of playing jazz to people who looked like my father." - (Straight No Chaser Issue 0ne Summer 1988.)

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Today Friday August 18

Afternoon
Rendezvous Jazz - The Black Horse, Front St., Monkseaton, Whitley Bay NE25 8DP. 1pm. Free.
Levee Ramblers New Orleans Quartet - Tynemouth Metro Station, Station Tce., Tynemouth NE30 4RE. 1pm. Free.
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Evening
Kentucky Cowtippers - Billy Bootleggers, 28 Nelson St., Newcastle NE1 5AN. 9pm. Free.
Ray Johnson & Richard Herdman - Prohibition Bar, Arch 3, Brandling St., Gateshead NE8 2BA. 8pm.
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Steve Bone - Al Forno, 81 Skinnergate, Darlington DL3 7LX. 7pm.
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To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Wednesday, June 07, 2017

Notes from day three of Durham City Jazz Festival - June 3.

(Review by Steve T/Photos courtesy of Carlo Viglianisi)
Day three and the years, booze and late nights have caught up, so apologies to Mark and Joel (pictured left), Barry and the Boys and Nebulas, all of whom I heard good things about from people with longer legs and greater stamina.
The Steve Glendinning Quartet gave a legendary performance at the Empty Shop a couple of years back and I know Steve will forgive me for saying the audience were mesmerised by the creative virtuosity of vibraphonist Chris Jelly. They both feature in fine funk band King Bee but the quartet gives them greater opportunity to show what they've got and, my goodness, what a lot they've got. Solid bass and drums too who are happy to stay back.
Some Pat Metheny, some Chick Corea, a fine original in a later Santana vein, Steve taking several opportunities to rock it up, this was a strong contender for set of the festival, and everyone I spoke to agreed.
Some people stuck around for the Sue Ferris Quartet, some crossed the bridge to the Empty Shop for Triptych, some of those returned to see both and others, myself included, watched a bit of Sue before heading over to catch a bit of Triptych.
Sue is always wonderful, a soulful player and a genuinely lovely person who always plays a tasteful set of lesser known gems from the greats including lesser known greats. She also had a cracking band of Dean Stockdale, Paul Grainger and boy wonder Matthew Mackellar depping on drums.
Triptych (pictured left) were deeper and funkier than I'd expected, with a definite Fender Rhodes sound which took me by surprise and means Paul Edis just about covers the entire spectrum across the various bands he fronts or features in. Serious music but in a different way to Sue, with mostly original compositions aimed at the head.
At the end he paid a sincere and heartfelt tribute to Carlo for his role in the festival, acknowledging that, as a Chester-le-Street lad, he would have loved this growing up. I had similar thoughts, having grown up in Durham City, odd unknowing flirtations notwithstanding, my introduction to Jazz (funk) was at mid-week nights at the old Coach and Eight, a triple jump from the Empty Shop. A seventeen year old me wouldn't have believed it.
Shock of the festival for me came from the Danny Allan Band. Great sax player who was happy to leave the stage to let the rest of this excellent band run and run. Not just a saxophone quartet, it was like alternating with a piano trio, like two bands for the price of one, sometimes funky, sometimes straight.
The closing party was at Jam Jah, an institution in Durham for a number of years, which began with another jam session and I regret to inform you, number one son was dominant again. A local professional drummer from a pop/rock covers band had played the final number at the Friday jam session which turned out to be Spain which he'd never heard, so good effort. Tonight they put together a funk workout to play to his strengths, FDT ramping it up to a funky blues, giving him carte blanch to just play and play without anyone thinking he should take the plectrum out of his hand.
The regular Jam Jah DJ brought the festival to a close with some funk, soul, fusion, disco, club classics, hip hop, rare groove - these terms become redundant - including Roy Ayers, Lamont Dozier, Idris Muhammed, Thundercat and Fela Kuti; and some reggae too.
First Class Honours with stars to Heather, Nick, Carlo and Ali and everybody who worked tirelessly to put this together, and I'm already looking forward to part two. 
Steve T

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Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

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