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Bebop Spoken There

More from Jazz Monthly:

Jack Cooke: "...neither Giuffre nor Jim Hall are even adequate jazz musicians, they are technically limited, and more importantly, seem unable to improvise logically" - (Review of a JATP concert. Jazz Monthly May 1960)

Bill Evans: "A composer writes something, and an orchestra interprets it--he spends maybe six months writing 10 minutes of music, but a jazz musician spends 10 minutes of playing 10 minutes of music, and he performs it himself". - (Jazz Monthly July1960).

Archives

Today Thursday October 19

Afternoon
Vieux Carré Jazzmen - Holystone, Whitley Rd., nr. Newcastle NE27 0DA. 1:oopm. Free.

Tees Valley Jazzmen - White Horse Hotel, Burtree Lane, Harrowgate Hill, Darlington DL2 1RH.Darlington. 1:30pm. Free.

Evening.

Mark Williams Trio - Empty Shop, 35c Framwellgate Bridge, Durham DH1 3NJ 8:00pm. £5.00.

Indigo Jazz Voices - Globe, 11 Railway St., Newcastle NE4 7AD. 7:30pm. £5.

Maine Street Jazzmen - Potter's Wheel, Sunniside NE16 5EE. 8:30pm. Free.

Darlington Big Band, MD Richie Emmerson - Dormans, Oxford Rd., Middlesbrough TS5 5DT. 9pm. Free.

New Orleans Preservation Jazz Band - Oxbridge, Oxbridge Lane, Stockton TS18 4AW. 8:30pm.01642 678129.
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To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Friday, March 31, 2017

Strictly Smokin’ Big Band @ The Millstone. March 30

(Review by Russell)
Less than twenty-four hours before the start of the big bash at Sage Gateshead the Millstone was packed. Stacked chairs were unstacked, posteriors were placed on them. The Strictly Smokin’ Big Band’s monthly public rehearsal session welcomed back the long lost Guy Swinton (last sighted in Lapland!) and, but for one or two deps, MD Michael Lamb had the regular band at his disposal.
It Had to be You sang F’reez, Don’cha Go ’Way Mad sang Alice. Pav - that’s the underrated Pawel Jedrzejewski on guitar - laid down a fine opening solo on Bag’s Groove, a typically good start. The vocal duo of F’reez and Alice had some fun on Wonderwall, MD Lamb enthused about Satin Doll – the band not so enthused, he said – and your reviewer concurred. The band’s printed set list (tune no.9) read: All or Nowt at Aaaalll. Aye, the Geet Geordie Songbook number went doon a treat.*
Mulligan’s Red Door closed out the first set, down to the bar, another Wylam Gold Tankard.

CLARE TEAL, GOGO PENGUIN AND SHOBALEADER ONE LEAD A STELLAR LINE UP AT GATESHEAD INTERNATIONAL JAZZ FESTIVAL THIS WEEKEND

(Press release)
Sage Gateshead is preparing to open its doors to thousands of music fans as it welcomes jazz artists from across the globe to the 13th Gateshead International Jazz Festival this weekend (Friday 31 March – Sunday 2 April).
Opening this year’s festival, award-winning singer and BBC Radio 2 presenter Clare Teal, and her 17 piece Hollywood Orchestra conducted by Guy Barker, celebrates timeless classics from the great American and British songbooks made famous by the likes of Ella Fitzgerald, Nina Simone, Nancy Wilson, Peggy Lee and Lena Horne. At the heart of this concert are three specially commissioned pieces. Guy Barker has been asked to re-imagine three classics associated with Lena Horne to be performed for the first time at Gateshead International Jazz Festival.

Thursday, March 30, 2017

JNE are Stalling Again.

For those visiting Sage Gateshead this weekend for the Gateshead International Jazz Festival, or are tempted by it, don’t forget that Jazz North East have a stall at which you can visit in-between concerts.  As in previous years, we have a vast hoard of jazz CDs for sale (at sensibly low prices) and a selection of photo-collage posters covering many of the performances we’ve put on in recent years – with three new ones! There’s a ‘2016 Year Poster’ showing many of the fine gigs we’ve seen through 2016, a ‘Going Dutch’ poster  from the All Day session this January at the Lit & Phil, and the finale of last year’s programme  – JNE’s  “Fluid Orchestra” with a large poster to celebrate its rehearsal sessions at The Bridge Hotel and its first performance at The Black Swan. 
So, in between the free music on the Concourse and some of the great bands in concert around Sage Gateshead, please pop over to see the JNE stall, look at the selection of posters and buy a CD or three!
Ken (JNE).

Wednesday, March 29, 2017

The Northern Monkey Brass Band @ The Fox, Hexham. March 28

Graham Hardy (trumpet), Ben Chinnery (trumpet), Jamie Toms (tenor saxophone), David Gray (trombone), Jason Holcomb (trombone), Phil Rosier (tuba), Adam Sinclair (snare drum) & Brendan Murphy (bass drum)
(Review by Russell)
The good folk of Hexhamshire have a Friend in Jesus. They may not have known it, but Graham Hardy’s New Orleans eight-piece made the trip way out west to spread the word, the missionary words ‘funky jazz’. The Northern Monkey Brass Band draws them in, softens them up with a pop tune of yesteryear, then sets about laying down some jazz, bold as brass.

RIP Arthur Blythe.


Saxophonist Arthur Blythe passed away on Monday, March 27. My memory is of hearing him live at the 1984 North Sea Jazz Festival at Den Haag in the company of Don Cherry, Chico Freeman, Hilton Ruiz, Cecil McBee and Don Moye in a band, appropriately called 'The Leaders'.

Although the music was outside of my comfort zone at the time, Blythe's fiery alto playing was, for me, a highlight of the weekend.
Peter Bevan recalls catching the band at Bracknell Jazz Festival that same year. Peter also saw him with the Gil Evans Orchestra in Manchester in 1978. Was Newcastle part of that tour which shared billing with the Stan Tracey Octet?
Arthur Blythe was 76.
Sadly missed.
Lance.

CD Review: Thundercat Presents "Drunk"

(Review by Steve T)
I wanted to review this ahead of the Gateshead International Jazz Festival where Miles Mosley, the other 'West Coast Get Down' bass player, is playing the Northern Rock Foundation Hall late Saturday night. Some may say it isn't Jazz but when did that ever stop me! Others may claim it's the very future of Jazz.
Kamazi Washington is the most easily recognisably Jazz, nephew of Trane, Flying Lotus is the innovative producer, Kendrick Lamar the rapper but it's the Jazz end of hip-hop rather than the punkrock look how rebellious I am. Thundercat is the funk end.

CD Review: Akua Dixon - Akua's Dance

Akua Dixon (baritone violin, cello, voice); Freddie Bryant (guitar); Kenny Davis (bass); Victor Lewis (drums); Russell Malone (guitar); Ron Carter (bass).
(Review by Steve T)
This must be the lady who played the Newcastle Jazz Caff a while back which I, unfortunately, couldn't make.
No doubt others will be able to point to precedents but I'm unaware of any Jazz with a cello as lead instrument and I was further intrigued to learn, after a couple of plays, that some of it's actually a baritone violin.
Her playing is immense and there's some brilliant solo exchanges, particularly with the guitarists.

Tuesday, March 28, 2017

As I was saying about Bob Dylan....

(By JC)
While there has been some debate about whether Bob Dylan should feature on BSH it should be noted that, following his two earlier GAS book recordings, he has now released another 30 songs on a 3-CD album called Triplicate. As this has just been released I have not heard it yet but it's on my list (at the moment I am still working my way through last year's release of a 36-CD box set of every concert on Dylan's infamous 1966 world tour!). However, I have read an interview he gave to Bill Flanagan to coincide with the release of Triplicate in which he talks in a very interesting way about why the songs are important to him and why he wants to record them.

ARW (Anderson, Rabin and Wakeman) play the music of Yes @ Manchester 02 Apollo, March 25.

Jon Anderson (lead vocals, acoustic guitar, percussion, harp); Trevor Rabin (guitars, vocals); Rick Wakeman (keyboards); + Lee Pomeroy (bass); Louis Morino 3rd (drums).
(Review by Steve T/Photos courtesy of Ian Watson).
Like in the late eighties, you wait years for a band to play Yes music when two come along at once. Then it was Yes (West) and ABWH and now it's Yes (featuring Steve Howe (H) and Allan White (Yes (West)) and Anderson (A), Rabin (Yes (West)) and Wakeman (W). Confused? The family tree is astonishing but the faithful totally get why these dozen or so musicians keep coming back to this music. Incidentally, the B is one Bill Bruford.
 I argued the case for their inclusion on a Jazz site when I reviewed Yes at Newcastle City Hall almost a year ago and it seems every emerging Jazz guitarist in particular, owes some debt to prog rock. But what about these three?

CD Review: Gianni Bianchini - Type 1

Gianni Bianchini (piano/vocals); Jason Marsalis (perc.); Richard Mikel (bass); Brandon Guerra (drums) + Karen Tennison (vocals).
(Review by Lance).
Not, as I'd falsely assumed, recorded in the heart of Rome but in Austin, Texas, by Floridian pianist cum singer Bianchini. 
A fine debut album.
A choice selection of GASbook items that reveal Bianchini to be a pianist of some standing. Although there's some Bill Evans in there, the overall impression is of Peterson in full flight tempered with Bianchini's own input.
A good combination!

CD Review: Torben Waldorff – Holiday on Fire

Torben Waldorff (guitar), Ingrid Jensen (trumpet), Maggi Olin (piano, Fender Rhodes), Drew Gress (bass) & Johnathan Blake (drums)
(Review by Russell).
Danish-born guitarist Torben Waldorff has assembled a stellar quintet to work on his latest project funded by the crowd-funding platform Artist Share. Over a period of several months Torben wrote the seven tunes on Holiday on Fire, Small’s, NYC, offered the intimate stage to premiere the work and the CD is now available to the jazz public.

Monday, March 27, 2017

Julian Siegel Jazz Orchestra @ Ronnie Scott's - March 16

(Review by Brian Blain/Photo courtesy of Anne Rigg)
From the spine-tingling brass stabs and powerful backbeat of Gene Calderazzo's drumming on the opening Mama Badgers, that took me back to that Brecker Brothers’ album with the WDR German Radio Big Band, the packed house at Ronnie Scott's (absolutely no freebies!) just knew that they were in for the kind of jazz excitement that only a 17 piece band can deliver.
Not that the whole program consisted of powerhouse sturm und drang; far from it. Tenor playing Siegel is a subtle and complex musical character, partially inspired by one of his mentors, Stan Sulzmann, one of the members of the saxophone section, and possibly responsible for the kind of  pah writing that pitted  Liam Noble in full elegiac mode against beautiful saxophone voicings on Tales From the Jacquard of which more later.

Maine Street Jazzmen at Seaton Sluice Social Club - March 26

Herbie Hudson (trombone/vocals); Jim McBriarty (clarinet/alto/vocals); Bob Wade (trumpet); Malcolm Armstrong (piano); Alan Rudd (bass); Ollie Rillands (drums); Olive Rudd (vocals).
Great session at Seaton Sluice Club last night. Two action-packed one-hour sets and a second appearance at this venue of South African trumpet ace Bob Wade
Looking forward to the Maine Street's gig at Ashington on April 5.Trying to get in touch with folks who first came to the club 35 years ago. It will be fantastic to see Malcolm Armstrong back on piano at the Elephant – he’s played there from the start.
On a less happy note, it seems that trombonist Don Fairley is in hospital undergoing tests following an ongoing heart problem. We all send him our best wishes for a speedy recovery.
John T.

RIP Bob Erdos


Just received the sad news from Patti Durham that Bob Erdos, founder of Stomp Off Records, passed away this weekend.
Stomp Off Records reflected Bob Erdos' passion for early classic jazz, Dixieland and ragtime. The Pennsylvanian-based label included several UK bands including Tyneside's New Century Ragtime Orchestra and the West Jesmond Rhythm Kings.
More details as further information is released.
Rest In Peace.
Lance.

Sunday, March 26, 2017

BBC Radio 3 - Hitting the High Notes.

Interesting program looking at the jazz/heroin scene in 1940/50's America. It asked the questions but I don't think it provided the answers.
Judge for yourselves.
Lance

SSBB w. Scarlet Street @ Hoochie Coochie - March 19

(Review by Kath G)
This was a superb event and one that I will put on my list of top gigs for this year! The SSBB and Scarlet Street, simply stupendous! The dancers flocked to this one, and the floor was full… in fact the joint was jumping and full to the rafters!
I am often delighted by the versatility of the SSBB and their varied contempory and traditional sounds, this gig was no exception… the introduction of a EWI (Electronic Wind Instrument) in the first number Pronk was simply fabulous.  I have previously heard Courtney Pine play one, and believe me, Steve Summers could give him a run for his money on this one… WOW!  Indeed, Strike up the Band!  A selection of delights from Miss Alice Grace followed, Somebody Loves Me, That Ole Devil Called Love, Heat of the Moment and Can’t We Be Friends, with equally delightful solos from Paul Gowland, Steve Summers, Keith Robinson, Jamie Toms and Michael Lamb.

Saturday, March 25, 2017

James Harrison & Caroline Bagley @ Jazz Café - March 24

James Harrison (keyboards & piano) & Caroline Bagley (alto saxophone & vocals)
(Review/Photo by Russell).
Friday nights at the Jazz Café have, of late, seen large crowds turning out to hear a succession of duo performances, and this week’s gig saw a quick return for pianist James Harrison, fresh from a stupendous jam session earlier in the week, working alongside a newcomer to Pink Lane, Caroline Bagley. Family and friends of the duo were out in force putting prime seats at a premium. Starting on time, what would the Teessiders play?
Autumn Leaves, Sunny and Moondance for starters with Bagley playing alto saxophone and, to the delight of many, singing. Ms Bagley first appeared on Bebop Spoken Here’s radar something like a decade ago when Jazzaction’s Sunday lunchtime workshop series in Stockton on Tees developed a succession of accomplished musicians, many of whom are today’s established names gigging on a regular basis throughout the region and beyond. 

Mick Shoulder’s Swing Manouche avec Picasso, Miró et al @ Bishop Auckland Town Hall - March 24

Mick Shoulder (guitar), Giles Strong (guitar), Paul Edis (clarinet) & Paul Susans (double bass)
(Review by Russell/Photo courtesy of Jerry Edis).
Mick Shoulder mixes with superstars as a matter of routine. This Friday lunchtime concert in the McGuinness Gallery at Bishop Auckland Town Hall, the second in a new monthly series of jazz gigs in the resurgent County Durham market town, featured Shoulder’s Swing Manouche outfit playing to a large audience including Pablo Picasso, Joan Miró and Elizabeth Frink.

CD Review: Partikel - Counteraction.

(Review by Steve H).
Partikel began life as a sax, bass and drums acoustic trio. However, they continually evolve their line up with different combinations of musicians. For this album, they have added guitar, cello, violin, flute, baritone sax and electronics and they all contribute to a marvellous canvas of contemporary, free-spirited jazz.
A quiet intro into Land and Sea leads to a very melodious up-tempo piece with Duncan Eagles on tenor the central figure. Scenes and Sounds continues at a fine old pace with Anna Cooper’s flute having an almost Tullish effect as in Jethro. Ant Law then produces a fine solo before Eagles sees the piece calmly out. 
Lanterns is another strident piece with Eric Ford on drums giving it a fine bish bosh and bassist Max Luthert keeping a fine ensemble piece going.

Friday, March 24, 2017

Street Scene

Russell captured this Edward Hopper-like image of Paul Ruddick blowing All the Things You Are on Northumberland Street.

Andchuck @ Hoochie Coochie - March 23

Nick Seymour (alto saxophone), Jack March (guitar), Tom Chapman (electric bass) & Gabriel Alexander (drums).
(Review/photos by Russell)           

Hoochie Coochie presents some of the finest soul, funk and jazz acts on planet Earth. Proprietor Warren Thomson offers performance opportunities to emerging musicians and this evening’s gig presented four students from the Royal Northern College of Music calling themselves Andchuck.
With an average age of something like twenteen, the Andchuck guys can play, no question! Four immensely talented young men, Andchuck gig at Matt and Phreds, Manchester and have played Manchester Jazz Festival. Tonight was an opportunity to hear them right here at 54 Pilgrim Street, Newcastle.

Thursday, March 23, 2017

Archipelago @ King’s Hall, Newcastle University - March 23

Faye MacCalman (tenor saxophone & clarinet), John Pope (electric bass) & Christian Alderson (drums)
(Review/photo by Russell)
And now for something a little bit different…’skronky garage-jazz’. The Western classical tradition, folk music and an occasional jazz concert is the usual bill of fayre at a term-time King’s Hall lunchtime concert. Archipelago, the Tyneside-based trio of Faye MacCalman, John Pope and Christian Alderson incorporate MacCalman’s ‘collage-inspired compositions’, Alderson’s interest in ‘avant-rock to jazz to noise’ and Pope’s ‘lifelong engagement with jazz, funk, rock music, pop-culture and mysticism’ resulting in a mélange of ideas and sounds.

Gateshead International Jazz Festival celebrates Lena Horne centenary









(Press release)
Sage Gateshead celebrates the songs of Lena Horne in her centenary year with BBC Radio 2 presenter Clare Teal, accompanied by her 17 piece Hollywood Orchestra conducted by world class trumpeter/composer Guy Barker. Opening this year’s Gateshead International Jazz Festival (Friday 31 March), ‘The First Ladies of Swing’ celebrates timeless classics from the great American and British songbooks made famous by the likes of Ella Fitzgerald, Nina Simone, Nancy Wilson, Peggy Lee and Lena Horne. 
Lena Horne was one of the great African-American figures in 20th century entertainment. She was a dancer, movie star, civil rights activist and singer.  She was also a great friend of Billy Strayhorn, who famously worked with Duke Ellington.

Wednesday, March 22, 2017

CD Review: Keith Oxman - East of The Village

Keith Oxman (tenor); Jeff Jenkins (B3); Todd Reid (drums).
(Review by Lance).
The organ trio has long been an integral part of the music. Sometimes frowned upon by purists but loved by others - myself included.
A tenor player in full flight, goosed along by an A1 B3 merchant and a driving drummer is a good place to be and, here we have those essential ingredients in one package.
Once again, I wonder where they will click outside of their Denver base. In a perfect world, they'd be touring the globe and, if they ever hit Newcastle upon Tyne, they'd be a natural for the Jazz Coop's Globe HQ. Not to mention Sage Gateshead, Hoochie, The Caff and all jazz venues between Newcastle and (including) Ronnie's.

An embarrassment of riches @ The Jazz Café - March 21

(Review/Photos by Russell).
This one was off the scale! Hanoi Pete created an opening for a budding piano dep. Step forward Mr James Harrison. Superb piano playing from the off – A Train, Our Love is Here to Stay, tonight was going to be good. A cast of thousands assembled in the wings, Ray Johnson (flugelhorn) got in there early – Softly, As in a Morning Sunrise with Harrison fleetingly quoting Puttin’ on the Ritz.
David Gray, trombone, does Latin (DG does anything and everything). Mr Strictly Smokin’ Michael Lamb, trumpet, joined DG on Don’t Get Around Much Anymore (Harrison incorporating something like a stride pattern), up jumped Alex Saxon on flute, drummer Matt MacKellar joined the party, the show was well and truly on the road. The joint jumpin’, this, the Jazz Café jam session the greatest free show in town!

GIJF 2017 - Not long now...

Just a reminder (as if you needed one!) that Gateshead International Jazz Festival is just over a week away. Friday, March 31 - Sunday, April 2 once again sees Sage Gateshead become the epicentre of the British Jazz World.
A whole host of goodies in store with something for just about everyone.
Programme.
Lance
(See you there.)

Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Before Tubby there was Harry

They weren't related although I'm sure Tubby dropped by Harry's place to have his tenor de-elasticated from time to time. Without saxophone players and postmen the elastic band industry would have collapsed years ago.
I mention Harry Hayes as, in the process of bringing some form of system to my CD/LP/Tape/78/etc collection, I discovered I had a couple of CDs by Harry Hayes and his Band.
I'd forgotten just what a delightful band this was. Recorded either side of D-Day and beyond, this was a band reminiscent of an Ellington or a Benny Carter small group and, indeed, Hayes' alto is not too far removed from Benny Carter himself.
The sidemen are also big hitters of the time - Kenny Baker, George Shearing, Tommy Whittle, George Chisholm, Aubrey Franks, Norman Stenfalt - to mention but a few.
The music straddles that period before Bop had fully crossed the pond or the revivalists had begun to wave their banjos.
It's the kind of band I'd like to hear today.
The discs were issued on Hayes' own label so I don't know if they're still available.
Listen to Drop Me Off at Harlem and you may want to find out more - or even start a band!
Lance.

Triggerlawross @ The Globe March 18

Alan Law (keys); Katy Trigger (bass guitar); Matt Ross (drums)
(Review by Ann Alex)
Yes, as suggested by the name, a monstrous new band has entered the local jazz scene: Alan Law playing as you’ve never heard him before, Katy Trigger giving the bass an equal status from her place at the right-hand side of stage front, and Mr. Ross giving it all on the drum kit. Eight or so long pieces, all original tunes, sounding as if most of the work had developed from improvisation, sometimes flowing lyrical keys, sometimes strong chords from the low end of the piano, then insistent, repeated riffs, often exchanged between piano and bass. An adventurous bass, lyrical, and then interestingly jangly and breathy by turns. And the drummer doing what drummers do, but more so.

Monday, March 20, 2017

Red House refurbishments

The Vieux Carré Jazzmen's 1st-Sunday-of-the-month session on Sunday 2nd April has been POSTPONED due to bar & restaurant renovation work. The pub will be closed. 
The work will be completed and the pub reopened the following weekend. 

For this special occasion, the reopening of the newly refurbished bar and restaurant, The Vieux Carré Jazzmen shall perform on Sunday 9 April. Showtime 8.00pm.

Dean Stockdale Trio @ Blaydon Jazz Club - March 19

Dean Stockdale (piano), Mick Shoulder (double bass) & Adam Sinclair (drums)
(Review by Russell/Photo courtesy of Roly Veitch)
As Blaydon Jazz Club embarks upon its thirty third year presenting the very best in jazz, pianist Dean Stockdale, in the company of Mick Shoulder, bass, and drummer Adam Sinclair, returned to the Black Bull on Bridge Street to play two sets of standards, original compositions and some Oscar Peterson. The audience, best described as select but discerning, hung on every note, an evening of intimate, small group jazz, a connoisseur’s delight.

Early Birds @ Jazz Café - March 16

Paul Edis (flute, clarinet, MD); Ben Lawrence, James Metcalfe (trumpets); Ryan DeSilva (baritone); Alex Thompson (alto); Mathew Downey (guitar); Phil Grobe (piano); Alex Shipsey (bass guitar); Matthew MacKellar (drums).
Ben Lawrence Trio - Dylan Thompson (drums).
(Review by Steve T).
Like police people, teachers and drivers, Early Birds just get younger. A veteran at seventeen, maybe now eighteen, Ben Lawrence was called upon to quell the high spirits of his fifteen or sixteen year old trio, after their debut at the Caff.
The band have regrouped and reinvented themselves and missed their former string section not.
Ladybird remains in the set and kicked things off for the just over twenty in the audience of mostly, but not exclusively family and friends. It's so easy for piano and guitar to get in each other’s way but these two have it cracked already, masterful comping from the guitarist and some great inflections cutting through from Dr Phil, his soloing far more confident and virtuosic than I've ever heard him. Look out Leeds.
Blue Bossa is another band favourite, here given a push towards the avant garde, particularly during the intro with Alex playing his mouthpiece and James playing muted.

Sunday, March 19, 2017

The Family Band @ Jazz Café - March 17

Riley Stone-Lonergan (tenor sax); Kim Macari (trumpet); Tom Rivière (bass); Steve Hanley (drums).
(Review/Photos courtesy of Ken Drew). 
First off, a composition by Macari, about a scorpion. Starting with a brief intro by herself, then an extended sax solo from Stone-Lonergan. 
A very lively opener. Then to a composition by Rivière, introduced by solo bass (bowed) with wind-sounding 'noises off' from the sax. 
A long section sees sax with trumpet - Stone-Lonergan solos melodically while trumpeter Macari utilises the distinct sound of her instrument to move between the tenor with counter phrasing and other less harmonic effects too.  Quite a slow and soulful tune - until they all let it rip for a short while, then ending quietly. Quite dramatic!  Then the pace picked up with all four, straight in with a well-paced number, the sax featuring here.  Blistering! And so refreshing!!   Closing the first set, a standard - I Don't Stand a Ghost of a Chance with You - lovely interplay, bluesy-soulful sax, with trumpet complementing in wonderful harmony, a superbly slow groove.  This piece would be perfect for a Sunny Sunday Jazz Festival, but for now a delightful end to the first set.

Thinking about Jazz Record Requests @ Sage Gateshead - March 18

(Review by Russell)
Jazz Record Requests is required listening. Your weekly Saturday afternoon appointment with Alyn Shipton is the jazz world’s equivalent of devotees of The Archers tuning to BBC Radio 4 Monday to Friday, never missing an episode. This March 18 edition of Jazz Record Requests was broadcast live during BBC Radio 3’s Free Thinking Festival at Sage Gateshead. The concourse overlooking a gray River Tyne a hive of activity – Radio 3 people busying themselves with who knows what and a Tyneside public with a thirst for listening to other people think – the natural meeting place for JRR’s legion of fans, familiar faces at every turn.

Saturday, March 18, 2017

Breaking News - RIP Chuck Berry.


Word has just come through that Rock and Roll legend Chuck Berry died earlier today (March 18) aged 90.
Jazz fans will recall him from the film Jazz on a Summer's Day and Sweet Little Sixteen but his influence and appeal was far wider. I only saw him live once. I thought it was at Middlesbrough in 1978 but it wasn't so it must have been in Holland at one of the North Sea Jazz Festivals. It was a late start and my memories are somewhat vague save for that incredible duckwalk that drew more applause than any of the solos! Numbers like Johnny B. Goode and No Particular Place to Go stand out for me. For more, go to Steve T's comment.
Lance.
I've just received a heads-up from Russell that Eric Burdon is to sing a tribute to Chuck Berry on Radio 4 at 9am (Sunday March 19).

CD Review: Erin Dickins - Vignettes

Back in 2011 I interviewed Erin after hearing her album Nice Girls Don't Stay For Breakfast. I was knocked out then and I'm reeling again listening to this new one. Erin, a founder member of Man Tran, finishes her European tour tomorrow night (Sunday March 19) at London's legendary '606' Club. Talk about Blues to be There!
Track 1: Erin Girl For Rhythm//Jumping With Symphony Sid. A clever merging of the two riff tunes with Erin sounding smoky and swingy. The nightclub chanteuse/the girl next door. All but two of the tracks on Vignette has Erin accompanied by a sole multi-instrumentalist - in this case - Paul Jost, a world class singer himself who pitches in on drums, vocal bass and harmonica.

Thinking about Gabi & Steve @ Sage Gateshead - March 17

Gabriele Heller (vocals, electronics) & Steve Glendinning (guitar)
(Review by Russell)
The Gold Dust ticket clearly stated: Please arrive 10 minutes beforehand, otherwise you may lose your place. The queue outside the Northern Rock Foundation Hall snaked past the East Door of Sage Two stretching to the (closed) balcony bar. This, twenty minutes before the advertised start time. Clipboard types strolled hither and thither, headsets and Access All Areas tags denoting their status…these were BBC Radio 3 people.
The queue comprised M & S and Waitrose types, Radio 3 their choice of listening, early morning through to late at night. They were here at Sage Gateshead to do some thinking, free thinking. Radio 3 people continued to stroll; clipboards, headsets, AAA tags, bottled water. A senior BBC type walked purposefully towards an AAA behind-the-scenes door, produced a swipe card (confirmation of big cheese status) and disappeared beyond. Bang on ‘start time’ a junior BBC/Sage person wandered along the snaking queue checking for Gold Dust. A BBC type (headset etc) breezed up the stairs from concourse to AAA door, a party of thirteen keen sixth form types following close behind, disappearing beyond the AAA door. Later, the BBC type emerged from beyond, dutiful sixth form ducklings, with munch-on-the-go sandwiches, skipping along to keep up with the Radio 3 Head Duck.

Friday, March 17, 2017

Daniel John Martin with Mick Shoulder’s Swing Manouche @ Empty Shop, Durham - March 16

Daniel John Martin (violin, vocals & whistling), Mick Shoulder (guitar), Giles Strong (guitar) & Paul Susans (double bass)
(Review by Russell)
The third night of four in Daniel John Martin’s tour of the north east. Working with Mick Shoulder’s Swing Manouche on all dates, DJM visited Durham’s unique first-floor Empty Shop premises. An empty shop is nothing new in Austerity Britain, but this listed building on Framwellgate Bridge can rightly claim to be bucking the trend. An ‘alternative space’ with its speakeasy door entry system, dusty floorboards and mix and match tables and chairs, Empty Shop is home to a developing jazz scene with plans afoot to stage a festival during the summer at numerous venues across the city.

Preview - SSBB & Scarlet Street @ Hoochie Coochie - Sunday March 19.

(Preview by Kath Gowland)
Tonight, Thursday, is the penultimate reheasal for the SSBB and Scarlet Street, so I thought I would pop in for a listen, and to give the readers of BSH a bit of a heads up on the forthcoming event at Hoochie Coochie this SundayStrike Up The Band what a gig this will be!

So what can you expect this coming Sunday….

Thursday, March 16, 2017

CD Review: Georgia Mancio & Alan Broadbent - Songbook

Georgia Mancio (voice/lyricist); Alan Broadbent (piano/music); Oli Hayhurst (bass); Dave Ohm (drums/perc.)
(Review by Lance).
GIJF invariably holds a myriad of delights and this year is no exception. Given the variety of styles on offer, it is not only unfair to single out one concert above the rest but nigh on impossible. Nevertheless, there is one concert that I simply can't miss - the one that the four musicians on this CD take part in on Sunday evening, April 2.
The musical partnership between Broadbent and Mancio is indeed a 'special relationship'. Broadbent's compositions and his sympathetic accompaniment; Mancio's lyrics and her winsome voice; the ingredients spell a recipe for a unique collaboration.

Wednesday, March 15, 2017

CD Review: Colin Steele Quintet – Even in the Darkest Places

Colin Steele (trumpet), Michael Buckley (saxophones), Dave Milligan (piano), Calum Gourlay (double bass) & Stu Ritchie (drums)
(Review by Russell)
Following a lengthy, debilitating illness Colin Steele is back. Off the scene for too long, trumpeter Steele has been in the studio to record a quintet album. Even in the Darkest Places references a difficult period from which he has emerged with renewed vigour, a new record and a gig diary as busy as any musician could wish for. The CD was recorded in July 2015 at Casltesound Studios, Pencaitland. Now, some twenty months later the physical product is finally available.

Paul Edis and Alyn Shipton at Sage Gateshead

Russell has reminded us that this weekend, Sage Gateshead presents the annual Free Thinking Festival which this year is not without some jazz interest as will be seen from this Radio 3 listing for Saturday, March 18 (4pm).
Lance.

CD Review: Club d'Elf - Live @ Club Helsinki

John Medeski (keyboards), Brahim Fribgane (oud, voice, percussion), Duke Levine (guitar), Mister Rourke (DJ), Mike Rivard (bass, sinter, bass kalimba), Dean Johnston (drums) + Thomas Workman (flute).
(Review by Steve T)
I generally like to play albums three times to give them a chance to sink in. I recently reviewed a Ben Cox album after two but, following the third play, I felt I'd been a bit critical. Half way through the first CD of this, I had a strong suspicion it's a monster but played it again just to confirm it wasn't my desperation to find something above the rest.
Mogador opens things up with a piano trio and spoken electronica before the entrance of guitar which will play such an important part, followed by more piano virtuosity, accompanied by high-end bass which never lets up over two CDs, changing time signatures Jazzing things up and Indian sounds arriving towards the end.

More Gypsy Jazz on the Horizon

Andrew Simpson sent me this info re another evening of Gypsy Jazz in the region. This time at Peterlee, a town situated on the left bank of the A19 (heading south).
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Emma Fisk's Hot Club du Nord bring to life the classic 1930s and 40s repertoire of Django Reinhardt and Stephane Grappelli's Hot Club de France. Featuring Emma Fisk on violin, James Birkett and David Harris on guitars and Bruce Rollo on double bass, the band encompasses a wealth of experience, knowledge and love of the hot club/ gypsy jazz style.

Daniel John Martin avec Mick Shoulder's Swing Manouche @ Jazz Café - March 14

Daniel John Martin (violin/vocal/whistling); Mick Shoulder, Giles Strong (guitars); Paul Susans (bass).
(Review by Lance/Photo courtesy of Mary B).
Couldn't put a name to the opener, it sounded vaguely like Anniversary Song but probably wasn't. Still, what's in a name? What was beyond dispute was that there was a treat in store.  No doubt about the next one - J'attendrai. I closed my eyes, was I really in a café on Pink Lane or was I in Montmartre? Although cafés are smoke-free these days I could almost sense the aroma of a Gauloise drifting by. Swing Manouche and Daniel John Martin are and always will be Parisians at heart. Hungaria had solos all round with the guest scatting unison lines as he played.

Tuesday, March 14, 2017

Lack of Afro @ Hoochie Coochie – March 10.

(Review/photos courtesy of 137 Imaging - Victoria Ling*)
It was a funked up Friday inside the now proclaimed ‘church of soul’ by which I mean, Newcastle’s Hoochie Coochie as Lack of Afro - the full band - took to the stage.  Opening with Roderigo and the crowd being a little on the shy side, it was vocalist Elliott Cole that urged them closer so they were right by the stage and that is where they stayed for the rest of the night. Adam Gibbons, Lack of Afro himself, was up front going from bass to bongos to tambourine.  With these two frontmen, it was so hard to keep up with the energy that you actually just lost yourself amongst it. Then add a keyboardist, a drummer, a saxophonist and a trumpeter to this vibe and turn the volume up to another 10! Seriously, I am not sure what more you can ask for and this was just the start.

Help wanted.

Can anyone advise one of our readers about master luthier Ken Walton? He lived in Spennymoor at one time and is renowned for the Waltone range of guitars - is he still active?
Lance.

CD Review: Josephine Davies – Satori

Josephine Davies (tenor & soprano saxophones), Dave Whitford (double bass) & Paul Clarvis (drums)
(Review by Russell).
Josephine Davies’ new album on Whirlwind Recordings is an improvising trio affair. Collaborators Dave Whitford and Paul Clarvis are old hands at this game and Davies playing tenor and soprano saxophones maintains interest throughout. Eight tracks with a total playing time of 54:30 provide a platform for Davies to stretch out and develop ideas, exhibiting equal facility on tenor and soprano.

CD Review: Jam Experiment – Jam Experiment

Alexander Bone (alto & soprano saxophones, synthesisers), Rory Ingham (trombone), Toby Comeau (keyboards & piano), Joe Lee (electric bass) & Jonny Mansfield (drums & percussion)
(Review by Russell)
It’s You opens Jam Experiment’s new album titled Jam Experiment with a drum and bass urgency, a slap-funk bass line and a first solo from co-leader, trombonist Rory Ingham. A positive opening declaration: This is us! Five young musicians living in London, studying at the Royal Academy of Music and the Guildhall School of Music and Drama, an award-winning ensemble with careers in music ahead of them, Jam Experiment is an impressive debut.

Monday, March 13, 2017

Vyamnikal @ The Egdirb (Bridge) March 12

Kit Downes (Harmonium); Tom Challenger (Tenor Saxophone)
(Review by Steve H/Photo courtesy of Ken Drew) 
The evening began with Kit Downes introducing The ’Vyamnikal’ project. To summarise, the project ran from October 2014; it involved Kit and Tom travelling to local Suffolk churches and improvising with the acoustics of the building and the assorted organs in whatever state of repair they happened to be in. After a year, the duo had accumulated 40 hours of recordings and this has been edited down to 1 hour to produce a new CD. To keep things real, the pair decide to play The Bridge venue ‘back to front’ so that the instrumentalists were in front of the bar at the back of the room meaning the audience were facing the rear of the room with the stage behind them now being used for additional seating. Although disorientating at first, I actually think this about turn added to the atmosphere of the proceedings.

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About this blog - contact details.

Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

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