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Bebop Spoken There

More from Jazz Monthly:

Jack Cooke: "...neither Giuffre nor Jim Hall are even adequate jazz musicians, they are technically limited, and more importantly, seem unable to improvise logically" - (Review of a JATP concert. Jazz Monthly May 1960)

Bill Evans: "A composer writes something, and an orchestra interprets it--he spends maybe six months writing 10 minutes of music, but a jazz musician spends 10 minutes of playing 10 minutes of music, and he performs it himself". - (Jazz Monthly July1960).

Archives

Today Thursday October 19

Afternoon
Vieux Carré Jazzmen - Holystone, Whitley Rd., nr. Newcastle NE27 0DA. 1:oopm. Free.

Tees Valley Jazzmen - White Horse Hotel, Burtree Lane, Harrowgate Hill, Darlington DL2 1RH.Darlington. 1:30pm. Free.

Evening.

Mark Williams Trio - Empty Shop, 35c Framwellgate Bridge, Durham DH1 3NJ 8:00pm. £5.00.

Indigo Jazz Voices - Globe, 11 Railway St., Newcastle NE4 7AD. 7:30pm. £5.

Maine Street Jazzmen - Potter's Wheel, Sunniside NE16 5EE. 8:30pm. Free.

Darlington Big Band, MD Richie Emmerson - Dormans, Oxford Rd., Middlesbrough TS5 5DT. 9pm. Free.

New Orleans Preservation Jazz Band - Oxbridge, Oxbridge Lane, Stockton TS18 4AW. 8:30pm.01642 678129.
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To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Sunday, January 22, 2017

CD Review:Tommy Smith Youth Jazz Orchestra - Efferevescence

Youth Jazz Orchestra no longer conjures up images of well-intentioned youngsters vainly attempting to emulate their peers. Quite the contrary. Like NYJO and many of the bands who will compete in this year's Sunderland Big Band Festival (March 3-5 at Chester le Street) the YJOs are of a standard where they can hold their own with just about any of the more seasoned performers. This is due, of course, to the ability of some of those seasoned performers to pass on their wisdom to the emerging talents. In the case of the TSYJO there can be few better equipped to bring out the best in a band than Tommy Smith. Equally at home with the internationally acclaimed Scottish National Jazz Orchestra, or a small band, or a symphony orchestra, Smith can do the business. On this third album by the TSYJO tribute is paid to some vintage numbers and some fresh interpretations of more contemporary jazz classics.

Apple Honey: The old potboiler from Woody's First Herd. It's near enough the original arrangement with the young soloists capturing the spirit of the original. Michael Butcher is Flip, Liam Shortall close enough to Bill Harris to almost fool you, Helena Kay plays some smooth clarinet that is perhaps nearer to Benny than Woody, Fergus McReady holds Ralph Burns to a score draw and Tom Walsh takes it out on a [literal] high.
The Way You Look Tonight: Florian Ross' imaginative arrangement features Jackson on alto and Garrity on trombone. Two assured soloists who do credit to Tommy Smith, Ross and - Jerome Kern. I doubt if the latter's estate will be going to litigation over this as they once did over a version of a Kern tune by Dizzy!
Blues March: It may not have the earthy rawness of the original version by Art Blakey's Jazz Messengers, indeed, I doubt if any of the umpteen versions recorded since then have matched it but, nevertheless, the TSYJO make a decent fist of it with solos by Bates, Stylianides and Bowden.
Humpty Dumpty: The first of two Chick Corea numbers showcases Williamson, Johnstone and Henderson in another Ross arrangement. None of whom took a great fall but did take great solos and nobody laid an egg
Tam O' Shanter: An original by Sean Bates that, as the title implies, takes us through the heather to Bannockburn to the skirl of Joe Williamson's guitar with maybe a wee dram on the way and a Michael Butcher chaser on the way back.
Nefertiti: Ross arranged the Miles Davis classic as a tenor feature for Butcher who does his growing reputation no harm.
Things to Come: Needless to say, the trumpets needed their lip in for this one taking Dizzy's look to the future even further forward. Gibbs and Kay the soloists with Henderson propelling the spaceship.
Bud Powell: A second helping of Chick Corea, this time arranged by Christian Jacob, has Gibbs once again in the spotlight and the first glimpse of Tessier on tenor. It rounds off an album that restores my faith in the future - at least jazzwise!
Lance.
Tom Walsh, Sean Gibbs, Joshua Elcock, Christos Stylianides, Cameron T Duncan, Tom Clay Harris (trumpets); Michael Owers, Liam Shortall, Kevin Garrity, Richard Foote (trombones); Helen Clay (alto/clarinet), Adam Jackson (alto), Samuel Tessier, Michael Butcher (tenors), Heather Mackintosh (baritone); Joe Williamson (guitar), Fergus McCreadie/ Pete Johnstone (piano), David Bowden (bass), Stephen Henderson (drums); Tommy Smith (MD/producer).
Available on Spartacus Records. Contact ts@spartacusrecords.com.

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About this blog - contact details.

Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

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