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Bebop Spoken There

Frank Zappa: "There was so much acid during the '60s that it was very easy for large numbers of people to think they had seen God as soon as the Beatles went boom, boom, boom, you know?." - (DownBeat May 18, 1978). – (DownBeat May 18, 1978).

Ryan Keberle: “Don't be easy on yourself when it comes to playing with perfect intonation. All other instruments will be playing with close-to-perfect intonation; the same should be expected of trombonists.'” – (DownBeat April 2018)

Today Friday March 23


Rendezvous Jazz - Monkseaton Arms, Front Street, Monkseaton NE25 8DP. Tel: 0191 251 3928. 1:00pm. Free.

Vieux Carré Jazzmen - Cullercoats Crescent Club, 1 Hudleston, Cullercoats NE30 4QS. Tel: 0191 253 0242. 1:00pm. Free.


Jiannis Pavlidis Trio - Jazz Café, Pink Lane, Newcastle NE1 5DW. Tel: 0191 222 9882. 9:00pm. £8.00. (£6.00. advance).

Hookahs - Billy Bootleggers, Nelson St, Newcastle NE1 5AN. 9:00pm. Free.

Five Men No Dog - Prohibition Bar, Arch 3, Brandling Street, Gateshead NE8 2BA. 8:00pm (doors 7:00pm). A ‘jar on the bar’ admission event.

Steve Bone - Al Forno, 81 Skinnergate, Darlington DL3 7LX. 7pm.

To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Thursday, November 03, 2016

CD Review: Jim Rattigan’s Pavillon – Strong Tea

(Review by Russell).
A former member of the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, Jim Rattigan recorded Strong Tea on the 11th October 2010. A twelve strong band, this ‘new’ album has been worth   waiting for. The French horn specialist hand picked the personnel, wrote the five tunes with them in mind and they have delivered the goods. Rattigan writes: I incorporate as much freedom in the music as is possible, leaving them space to express themselves. A good idea Mr Rattigan, the result is a resoundingly swinging album!

Having worked in jazz orchestras, Rattigan was inspired to form his own twelve piece band, calling it Pavillon. The musicians are ‘first call’ exponents of straight ahead jazz with that all important quality – the ability to swing. The rhythm section just can’t help swinging - no surprise there with the irrepressible Gene Calderazzo on drums alongside bassist Dave Whitford. Soloists are credited in the CD liner notes: Andy Panayi (tenor) and Percy Pursglove (flugelhorn) on Dulwich Park, Martin Speake (alto saxophone) and Steve Fishwick (trumpet) on the title track. Each contribution is top quality, the ensemble playing top drawer. Rattigan’s own playing sparkles, not least on Won Over the Eight. A nod to the Jimmy Giuffre Trio surfaces on Dulwich Park, and an association with Carla Bley and others has, perhaps, informed Rattigan’s approach to composition.
Strong Tea has a running time of forty minutes. So good is it that another forty minutes would have been most welcome.             
Jim Rattigan (French horn), Martin Speake (alto saxophone), Andy Panayi (tenor saxophone), Mick Foster (baritone saxophonist), Percy Purseglove (trumpet & flugelhorn), Steve Fishwick (trumpet), Robbie Robson (trumpet), Jeremy Price (tenor trombone), Sarah Williams (bass trombone), Hans Koller (piano), Dave Whitford (bass) & Gene Calderazzo (drums)

Strong Tea by Jim Rattigan’s Pavillon is released on Friday 4 November on Pavillon Records (002). Rattigan tours the album beginning at the EFG London Jazz Festival at the Vortex on November 12 with further dates into next year. Highly recommended – CD and tour. For further information visit:

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Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: I look forward to hearing from you.