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Bebop Spoken There

More from Jazz Monthly:

Jack Cooke: "...neither Giuffre nor Jim Hall are even adequate jazz musicians, they are technically limited, and more importantly, seem unable to improvise logically" - (Review of a JATP concert. Jazz Monthly May 1960)

Bill Evans: "A composer writes something, and an orchestra interprets it--he spends maybe six months writing 10 minutes of music, but a jazz musician spends 10 minutes of playing 10 minutes of music, and he performs it himself". - (Jazz Monthly July1960).

Archives

Today Thursday October 19

Afternoon
Vieux Carré Jazzmen - Holystone, Whitley Rd., nr. Newcastle NE27 0DA. 1:oopm. Free.

Tees Valley Jazzmen - White Horse Hotel, Burtree Lane, Harrowgate Hill, Darlington DL2 1RH.Darlington. 1:30pm. Free.

Evening.

Mark Williams Trio - Empty Shop, 35c Framwellgate Bridge, Durham DH1 3NJ 8:00pm. £5.00.

Indigo Jazz Voices - Globe, 11 Railway St., Newcastle NE4 7AD. 7:30pm. £5.

Maine Street Jazzmen - Potter's Wheel, Sunniside NE16 5EE. 8:30pm. Free.

Darlington Big Band, MD Richie Emmerson - Dormans, Oxford Rd., Middlesbrough TS5 5DT. 9pm. Free.

New Orleans Preservation Jazz Band - Oxbridge, Oxbridge Lane, Stockton TS18 4AW. 8:30pm.01642 678129.
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To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Sunday, November 06, 2016

Big Muddy @ The Globe Jazz Bar on Bonfire Night

(Review by Ann Alex/photo from archives)
We didn’t need fireworks at the Globe as we had our own in musical form. The horns struck up for a prompt start, soon followed by the whole band doing a couple of tunes that I should have known the names of, good and lively anyway. Jude came on with a rollicking version of Black Velvet, a recent song which sounded so good that it could have been written ages ago, as she explained. And Jude was on top form, spirited, raunchy singing, looking so cool in long black boots and black peaked cap, black and white short skirt and top. (The men were mostly clad in black tops and jeans, I never just describe women’s attire, that’s against Feminist rules).

Brubeck’s Broadway Bossa, not often played, had the brass in harmony and Dave on shaker;  then Dave sang Don’t Get Around Much anymore, a slow, bluesy, speakeasy version led by muted cornet  and Dave asking people to join in, as if it was a folk club, said Jude. No-one did. Jude then told us that I Wish I Could Shimmy Like My Sister Kate, which apparently is not just about a dance, then Gordon played clarinet on a Dixieland number. Fine Brown Frame, sang Jude, and she didn’t mean a picture frame, quite a night for double meanings as she pointed out. This included a distinctive muted trombone solo. To round off the first set, we were treated to a Blues Brothers tune and Dave enthusiastically telling us about Mustang Sally.
A short flute intro heralded the second set which included Come Home Baby; Stolen Moments, with a very smooth trombone and Dave on vocals; Herbie Hancock’s Canteloupe Island with Gordon beating it out on claves. A sad, Got To Get Better, sang with feeling by Jude; Horace Silver’s Song For My Father, actually written for his father; Dave singing a spirited Georgia on my Mind (Hoagy Carmichael); then Gordon struck up on the vocal of Big Noise (From Winetka?), with jungle-like drums and – at last - a skilled bass guitar solo. A great evening’s performance was rounded off with Dave singing Silver’s The Preacher, which is, as we all know, based on the chords of Show Me the Way to Go Home. So home I went, well content after a great night of music.

Ann Alex     
Jude Murphy (vocals, bass guitar, flute); Dave Weisser  (vocals, cornet, shaker); Gordon Brown (alto sax, clarinet, claves); John Haylock (baritone sax); Nigel Robson (piano, trombone); Lionel Hehir (guitar); Stu Holiday (drums).

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Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

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