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Bebop Spoken There

Dewey Redman: "When Trane came to Bop City in San Francisco and told me he liked the way I played, I stayed high off that forever." - (Downbeat June 1980.)

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Nick Brignola: “I got to talk to John Coltrane before he was John Coltrane!” – (Jazz Journal April 1991)

Archives.

Today Wednesday January 18

Afternoon.
Vieux Carre Jazzmen - Crescent Club, 1 Hudleston, Cullercoats NE30 3OS. 1pm. Free.
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Evening.
Take it to the Bridge - The Globe, 11 Railway St., Newcastle NE4 7AD. £1. 8pm.
Ruth Lambert w. Alan Law Trio - Cherry Tree Restaurant, 9 Osborne Rd., Jesmond, Newcastle. 7:30pm. No cover charge.
Levee Ramblers NOJB - Springwell Village Community Venue, Fell Road, Springwell, Gateshead NE9 7RP. 8:30pm. £3.00. Note earlier start and a small increase in admission.
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Tees Hot Club - Cleveland Bay, 718 Yarm Rd., Eaglescliffe, TS16 0JE. 9pm. Free.
To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Monday, May 09, 2016

Roy Ayers preview Sage 2 Thursday May 12.













(Review by Steve T)
Promised a short review of this but then realised Mr. Ayers and I go back; back almost to the beginning; that's my beginning, not his.
It was 1977 and my brother brought in a 7" single - Running Away. Is it disco? Soul? Funk? Apparently it's Jazz Funk, like Benson, Hubert Laws and Idris Muhammed which had been infiltrating the more forward thinking end of the Northern Soul scene - ie Blackpool Mecca - for a couple of years and would orchestrate a complete split from stompy old Wigan Casino the following year.
Roy Ayers consolidated his position on the newly liberated Jazz Funk scene with a couple more dancefloor hits: Get On Up, Get On Down and Can't You See Me? the latter providing the soundtrack for a certain Durham Restaurant owner, who had adopted the Roy Ayers look of the time - tan suit and Panama – and, along with a friend, stripped down to their umbrellas at the Coach and Eight in Durham, which is probably too much information for anyone who's figured out who he is.
When Jazz Funk imploded shortly after (some would say it never amounted to anything and for a long time I would have agreed) I moved on to bigger and better things but was reminded of Roy Ayers when visionary DJ Colin Curtis played his version of For Real on pirate radio at a Soul Weekender in Fleetwood in the late eighties, mixing - or perhaps I should say exploding - into the original by Flowers, a monster track on the rare soul scene, at the time fetching £100 for a poor 7" edit and I'm told you can now name your price.
Nowadays, promoters sometimes prime acts to play tracks they've sometimes forgotten so we may get For Real, but hopefully we won't get Poo Poo La La which is where he wants to kiss you baby.
I've just missed him loads of times, including when he played Hoochie Coochie last year, which clashed with Dan Penn and Spooner Oldham at the Sage, legendary but ultimately over-rated soul songwriters, but I plumped for Fun Lovin Criminals, probably a mistake but Durham Gala is just so much more convenient for me.
I've decided to see him this year because he's almost 75 and because I'm a huge admirer of local vibes monster Chris Jelly from King Bee, who rates Roy, as you can imagine and I know it's mutual. King Bee are in fact supporting Roy Ayers and Lonnie Liston Smith (due at Hoochie soon) in Kent later in the month.
When Chris played the Empty Shop in Durham with the Steve Glendenning Quartet we were all completely mesmerised; even Carlo who normally bobs in and out sat transfixed throughout. At the interval he did a repair job with plasters patching up his hands and must factor in that he will destroy his hands whenever he performs, requiring a period of healing, and presumably Roy has been through the same thing. They should be given the freedom of the city, every city, town, village and hamlet, alongside the Queen, the President, the Pope and the Few.
There's still a few tickets available for Thursday night and Roy Ayers deserves it. So if you like Jazz, Jazz Funk, Funk, Soul or (pre Bee Gees/ Donna Summer) disco you should give it a go.
Steve T.

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Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

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