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Bebop Spoken There

Michael Feinstein: “Fred Astaire is my favorite singer. To me, he was the perfect interpreter of American popular song.” – (Jazz Times December 2014).

Bud Shank: “Once I saw California – that was it, I stayed.” – (Jazz Journal May 1991)

Archives.

Today Thursday February 23

Afternoon
Vieux Carré Jazzmen - The Holystone, Whitley Rd., Holystone, Newcastle (ish) NE27 0DA. 1pm. Free.
Evening.
Maine St. Jazzmen - Potters Wheel, Sunniside, Gateshead NE16 5EE. 8:30pm. 0191 4888068.
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Strictly Smokin' Big Band - Millstone, Haddricks Mill Rd., South Gosforth, Newcastle NE3 3DB 7pm.
Indigo Jazz Voices - The Globe, 11 Railway St., Newcastle NE4 7AD. 7:30pm. Free.
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Tees Hot Club w. Gus Smith (vocals); Richie Emmerson (tenor); Bruce Taylor (keys) - Dorman's, Oxford Rd., Middlesbrough. 9pm. Free.
New Orleans Preservation Jazz Band - Oxbridge Hotel, Oxbridge Lane, Stockton on Tees. 8:30pm.
Pocket Jazz Orchestra - The Ship, Church Lane, Redmarshall TS21 1EP. 8pm. Free.
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To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Monday, April 25, 2016

Darlington Jazz Festival: Matt Roberts Sextet plays the music of Nat Adderley. April 22


Matt Roberts (trumpet), George Grant (alto saxophone), Leo Richardson (tenor saxophone), Sam Watts (piano), Simon Read (double bass) & Dave Ingamells (drums)
(Review by Russell/Photo courtesy of Shaune Eland.)
Darlington’s Matt Roberts returned from his London base to make his now customary big contribution to the Darlington Jazz Festival. This year’s event, the fifth, featured a superb sextet assembled by the amiable trumpeter. The Leeds College of Music graduate made a few calls – some of them to fellow LCoM alumni – and the band that turned up on Friday evening at the Voodoo Café played a gig that will forever live in the memory.
Last year Matt Roberts played the music of Fats Navarro, this year, Nat Adderley. Six of the best musicians to be found anywhere on the British jazz scene were at it from the down beat. Tenor man Leo Richardson tore the place apart on the opener Movin’. The crowd – a standing room only affair – whooped and hollered. Every solo, all night long, cheered to the rafters. 52nd Street is but in the imagination for most, this gig at the Voodoo Café on Skinnergate surely captured something of how it was back then.
Altoist George Grant, teased by Roberts for being in semi-retirement at thirty-something (in reality a heavy teaching commitment restricting his gigging opportunities), did just as Richardson did – he tore the place apart. Then there was Roberts, he did the same thing.
Blue Brass Groove, Little Joanie Walks (slow burning alto, walking talking bass playing by Simon Read) and a New Orleans’ marching groove with Richardson’s incendiary solo on The Popeye. Pianist Sam Watts played another blinder here at the festival. Drummer Dave Ingamells drove the band a lá Art Blakey, generating such levels of excitement that some of the more senior members of the audience were, perhaps, in danger of a cardiac arrest! Sister Caroline, Stoney Island and Bohemia After Dark maintained the momentum across two sets. More? Dizzy’s Business, Fun, Games, tune after tune. Of course the Matt Roberts Sextet finished with Work Song. Perfect.
All seats taken, any number stood at the back and down the sides of the room with a pint in hand A noticeable feature of the Darlington Jazz Festival is the level of support shown by other musicians and this gig on Skinnergate was no different. The gig was staffed by a group of young volunteers. Musicians themselves, they ran the show and did a great job. One day some of them will follow in the footsteps of Matt Roberts. Easy going, obliging, Roberts is a cracking trumpet player. Gig of the year? You bet! Next year, Matt Roberts plays the music of…
Russell.          

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Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

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