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Bebop Spoken There

Ben Pollack: "The kind of people who go for the old style New Orleans jazz are the same kind of people who go in for collecting antiques." - (Down Beat May 5, 1950).

Flip Phillips: "I heard this band out in California. I think - Lu Waters, isn't it? They sure can march down the street but I wouldn't want to march with them!" - (Down Beat June 15, 1951).

Today Monday June 26

Afternoon.
Jazz in the Afternoon - Crescent Club, 1 Hudleston, Cullercoats NE30 3OS. 1pm. Free.
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Evening.
????????
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To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Saturday, August 08, 2015

Paul Edis Trio @ The Jazz Café. August 7

Paul Edis (piano), Mick Shoulder (double bass) & Adam Sinclair (drums)
(Review by Russell/photos courtesy of Mike Tilley).
The Paul Edis Trio at the Jazz Café. Your monthly treat. The place was buzzing from the earlier hour-long set by the Early Birds (see LL’s review). Many in the audience made a night of it – first listening to the young musicians in the upstairs room, then sitting and standing in the downstairs bar to hear Edis, Shoulder and Sinclair.
What Is This Thing Called Love? All three musicians on it from the start. The lid of the piano discarded, its innards on display, a metaphorical glimpse into the mind of the pianist. The hammers in motion created a mechanical, analogue fairground display, much more revealing than any digital alternative. Stompin’ at the Savoy – samba style – then an exceptional Our Love is Here to Stay. Pianist Edis’ magically old school, lagging-behind - the-beat, style worked off the precision of  bassist Mick Shoulder and ace drummer Adam Sinclair. Jobim’s Dindi, then a tune to mark the passing of pianist John Taylor (Paul Edis knew his fellow pianist from York University) – Bill Evans’ Peace Piece played as a solo piano feature.
A keen listener remarked that the set list couldn’t have been better. Freddie Freeloader (a Kind of Modal masterpiece), Basie swing (One O’clock Jump), Yesterdays with a fleeting Four. Quotes peppered Edis’ playing; clever stuff and good fun. ‘What’s that one? It’s...’ The packed room stayed on for the second set. People had travelled from far and wide for the occasion – from Greater Elswick to Germany. Another listener noted the atmosphere – a full house, the majority listening intently, all seats taken, bar stools lining the bar with many standing – as being particularly good. Yes, it was one of those nights.
Paul Edis is like Stan Tracey. You get Ellington and you get Monk. A dream combination – a Monk’s Dream you could say. Adam Sinclair’s brushes skittered over his kit on Emily as expertly as anyone could wish to hear. The trio’s performance just got better and better as we heard the slow take on Take the A Train. This one should be recorded. How about The Paul Edis Trio Live at the Jazz Café? They played on – A Night in Tunisia – and finally, I Could Have Danced All Night. They could have played all night.    
Russell.

3 comments :

  1. Wow !! what a review - what a gig !!! And to be compared to Stan Tracey too !! Sumptuous review of what seems to have been a superb gig.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Yes Ken Drew! It was indeed a superb gig - all three guys giving it all in that hot and sweaty jazz caff, and with a brilliantly distinctive play list. Oh, and a great review from Russell too .....

    ReplyDelete
  3. The Jazz Cafe was the place to be last Friday - New York and Ronnie's on Pink Lane. Benny Goodman upstairs, Stan Tracey down and the Paul Edis Trio. The Trio were fantastic and on top of their game. A great session.

    ReplyDelete

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About this blog - contact details.

Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

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