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Bebop Spoken There

John Tynan: "Go ahead, call me reactionary. I happen to object to the musical nonsense being peddled in the name of jazz by John Coltrane and his acolyte Eric Dolphy." - (Downbeat November 22, 1961).

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McCoy Tyner: "If anyone want to know how the three of us - Elvin, Jimmy and me - felt about John [Coltrane], listen to the music and you can hear the love and respect we had for each other. The music can really speak more than any of us." - (Melody Maker, August 19, 1967).
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Today Monday April 24

Afternoon.
Jazz in the Afternoon - Crescent Club, 1 Hudleston, Cullercoats NE30 3OS. 1pm. Free.
Evening.
?????
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To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Sunday, August 09, 2015

Mark Williams & Joel McCullough @ The Jazz Café. August 8

Mark Williams (guitar) & Joel McCullough (guitar)
(Review by Russell).
Friends from way back, Irishmen Mark Williams and Joel McCullough hooked up once again to play some jazz guitar together at their old haunt, the Jazz Café on Pink Lane. A small number of jazz guitar enthusiasts took their seats as the duo began with Stella By Starlight.
The seated Williams and McCullough complemented one another stylistically; Williams’ intricate harmonic progressions, McCullough’s linear lines light of touch. Rhythm duties shared, the duo developed solos in turn. A mutual appreciation of Steve Swallow’s tunes saw two such in the set. Jokingly Williams enquired: Why are we playing a bass player’s tune? Swallow’s compositions – Falling Grace and Ladies in Mercedes – were given due respect, the musicianship of a high order.
Tadd Dameron’s Lady Bird stood out, McCullough finding his way around the fret board with ease, then doing it all again taking a different route. There There There, a Williams’ original composition, unsurprisingly posed few problems to the composer (!), his partner took a look at it and got it, the duo dovetailing to great effect. The Saturday night crowd grew in number and, in due course, the voluble were clearly audible. The few enthusiasts weren’t about to allow their concentration to be broken and right on cue a major highlight came in the form of Joe Henderson’s The Inner Urge. Gargantuan playing from both men appreciated by those with (non-cloth) ears. The set concluded in a blues vein; Gee Baby, Ain’t I Good to You? Two friends playing jazz guitar, entirely non-competitively. A night for the enthusiast.     
Russell.

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Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

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