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Bebop Spoken There

Dave Gelly: “From 1 January 1920, when prohibition was imposed in the US, people didn’t stop drinking, they just stopped drinking legally.” – (Jazz Journal October 2017).

Regina Carter: “When I was a teenager, I would daydream about going out on a date and dancing to Ella’s music.” (Down Beat October 2017).

Bebop Spoken Here on hold

As of tonight (November 15) at 21:00 hrs, this site will be temporarily on hold to allow for essential executive maintenance. Some minor activity may be possible during this period and we hope to have normal service resumed as soon as possible.
We apologise for any inconvenience caused.
Lance

Today Thursday November 16

Afternoon
Vieux Carré Jazzmen - Holystone, Whitley Rd., nr. Newcastle NE27 0DA. 1:00pm. Free.

Tees Valley Jazzmen - White Horse Hotel, Burtree Lane, Harrowgate Hill, Darlington DL1 3AD. Tel: 01325 463262. 1:30pm. Free.

Evening.
Maine Street Jazzmen - Potter’s Wheel, Sunniside, Gateshead NE16 5EE.

Ponyland - Bar Loco, 22 Leazes Park Road, Newcastle NE1 4PG. Tel: 0191 232 5871. 8:30pm. Free.

TBA – Railway, Wellington St., Gateshead. 8pm.

Mary Coughlan - Queen Vic, 78 Victoria Road, South Shields NE33 5PQ. 0191 447 0290. Doors 7:00pm. £18.00 (advance) from The Word (South Shields Library) or by card, tel 0191 427 4597.

Tees Hot Club w. Kevin Eland (trumpet); Donna Hewitt (sax); Graham Thompson (keys) - Dorman’s, Oxford Road, Middlesbrough TS5 5DT. 9:00pm. Free.

New Orleans Preservation Jazz Band - Oxbridge, Oxbridge Lane, Stockton TS18 4AW. 8:30pm.01642 678129.

To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Wednesday, May 06, 2015

CD Review: Partikel – String Theory

Duncan Eagles – saxophones; Max Luthert – bass; Eric Ford – drums - with Benet McLean, David LePage – violin; Carmen Flores – viola and Matthew Sharp – cello.
(Review by Hugh)
It is often said that one should not judge a book by its cover – well, in this case a reviewer should not judge a CD by its first 10 seconds!  The first track on String Theory  - Clash of the Clans (Part 1) commences with a burst of scraping horse hair on steel.  This soon gives way to more conventional jazz music with a definite groove. 

Partikel are a London – based trio who have been making a name for themselves on the European scene for the last few years.  String Theory is their third release and differs from the previous two releases, which were the product of preparatory rehearsing and fine tuning of arrangements before recording.  In the words of Duncan Eagles “with this album [String Theory] the charts I wrote for the trio were purposefully more open and melodic than previous material and the arrangements were developed through touring with the band – rather than all the rehearsing – which I think gives the trio performance on this album a more natural and spontaneous dynamic”.
This comes through on the recording.  The first track is one of three parts, followed by Part 2 Seeking Shadows and Part 3 Midnight Mass. 
Eagles wanted the string quartet to be as involved as possible and for the two ensembles to interact and improvise together.  This is borne out in Shimmer, where the two ensembles appear to chase each other.  Introduction to the Buffalo (naturally) precedes The Buffalo – the former is performed  purely by the string quartet, seguing effortlessly into  
the latter where the two ensembles rejoin.  Eric Ford's Tabla adds an exotic feel to this track and several others and strings have an almost gypsy quality at times.  Next we are back on jazz mainstreet with Bartering for Bob.  Shimmering strings introduce The River, with Eagles' soprano soaring over the surface, hovering for a while and then following the flow.  We end up on Wray Common (no, I don't know either – local connection, I presume!).  Matthew Sharp's cello introduces Body and Soul (by Johnny Green) – this is the only track (other than Introduction to the Buffalo) which is not composed by Duncan Eagles.  Cover ups the tempo again with the trio powered along by Ford's driving percussion.  The quartet get a rest on this track.  The opening of The Landing is evocative of the wider  universe (perhaps something to do with the album title?) and the track has a filmic quality with definite plot progression, the listener will make up their own mind as to where it's going.

Partikel's String Theory will be released by Whirlwind Records (catalogue WR4671) on 11 May 2015.  The band are touring from 28th May with an album launch at Pizza Express on 2 June.  None of the dates listed on the information sheet with the album are north of Bungay as far as I can see.  I guess we will have to wait and see if the band pluck up courage and venture over the border!
Hugh.

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Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

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