Total Pageviews

Bebop Spoken There

More from Jazz Monthly:

Jack Cooke: "...neither Giuffre nor Jim Hall are even adequate jazz musicians, they are technically limited, and more importantly, seem unable to improvise logically" - (Review of a JATP concert. Jazz Monthly May 1960)

Michael James: "...if Ellis [Herb] has merits they are definitely not these [fantastic fire and drive]". - (Review of Herb Ellis Meets Jimmy Giuffre (LP). Jazz Monthly May 1960).

Archives

Today Tuesday October 17

Afternoon
Vieux Carré Jazzmen - Black Bull, 98 Front St., East Boldon NE36 0SG. 1pm. Free. 0191 5365127. 5th of 6 consecutive gigs. 2 mins from East Boldon metro.
-----
Evening
Charles Gordon (solo piano) - Redwood Bar, Vermont Hotel, Newcastle. 10pm - midnight. Free.
Jam Session - Jazz Café, 25 Pink Lane, Newcastle NE1 5DW. 8pm. Free. James Harrison on piano.
-----
To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Thursday, April 09, 2015

The Dave Weisser Orchestra @ The Chilli. April 8

Dave Weisser (trumpet & vocals), Ray Johnson (trumpet & flugelhorn), Don Forbes (trumpet), Dougie Fielder (tenor saxophone), Rachel Richman (alto saxophone), Tom Lapworth (guitar), Steve Whitfield (keyboards), Barrie Ascroft (bass) & Norman Redhead (drums) + second set Ian Forbes (drums) & Gerry Vega (guitar)
(Review by Russell).
Take it to the Bridge at the Chilli has its nights and this was one of them. Orchestral proportions on the stand, Dave Weisser happily enquired time and again: Okay guys, what’s next? knowing that the guys in the band would come up with something good. Last week’s arctic conditions a distant memory as Heaton’s number one real ale pub basked in late evening spring sunshine, spirits were high and some – no names Peter - were high on spirits.
Antonio Carlos Jobim, Gigi Gryce, Stanley Turrentine – as composers they offered a wide spectrum of material and the orchestra’s soloists stepped up to the mark with no little relish. Ray Johnson (trumpet) hit the ground running, others followed his lead in making positive statements. A Dave Weisser vocal intro on Without a Song faced two interruptions from his band mates as workshop democracy discussed tempo and the doubling of bars. Agreement reached, DW sang and played strong trumpet. A nonet formed with the arrival of Don Forbes and Rachel Richman. Jive Samba prospered as Johnson and Forbes (trumpets) upped the ante, the rhythm section responded and the horn-lead ensemble flourished.
Frank Foster’s Simone opened the second set and introduced newcomer Gerry Vega. Forbes D soloed, then Johnson on flugelhorn, altoist Rachel Richman and tenor man Dougie Fielder. Forbes D turned round to guitarist Vega, nodded – Your turn! The new boy gave it a shot, winging it as he went. No matter, the Dave Weisser workshop thrives on moments like this. GV is on board! He’ll be back. 
Wayne Shorter’s One by One vied with one or two other tunes for ‘highlight of the night’. Fabulous trumpet from Don Forbes, equally fabulous piano from Steve Whitfield and Vega hung in there. Ian Forbes, a marvel of modern jazz, did the business, then upped and left. 
The redoubtable Norman Redhead resumed engine room duties alongside the immaculate bass playing of Barrie Ascroft. I Fall in Love Too Easily (a GAS book gem) heard mellifluous flugel from Johnson, muted Weisser trumpet and a considered solo from Richman. Limehouse Blues was to be the set closer. Was…the parts went astray. Blue Monk suggested Richman, the nonet settled for Straight No Chaser. A raft of solos, guitarist Tom Lapworth’s the pick of them. Thanks to Peter for his frequent interjections (a line or two from a song, vocal encouragement for the soloists) adding to the evening’s entertainment.              
Russell.

No comments :

Post a Comment

Blog Archive

About this blog - contact details.

Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

Subscribe!