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Bebop Spoken There

Dewey Redman: "When Trane came to Bop City in San Francisco and told me he liked the way I played, I stayed high off that forever." - (Downbeat June 1980.)

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Nick Brignola: “I got to talk to John Coltrane before he was John Coltrane!” – (Jazz Journal April 1991)

Archives.

Today Monday January 16

Afternoon.
Jazz in the Afternoon - Crescent Club, 1 Hudleston, Cullercoats NE30 3OS. 1pm. Free.
Evening.
???????
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To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Saturday, January 31, 2015

Dead Hedge Trio @ The Jazz Café. January 30














Nick Branton (tenor saxophone & clarinet), Rory Ballantyne (guitar) & Michael Metcalfe (drums) 
(Review by Russell/photos by Kath Jobes - left - and Mike Tilley - Right.)
All seats were taken before the eight o’clock start. The Dead Hedge Trio started on time. Liverpool based, a gig in Leeds the previous evening, the trio were, for the first time, on the road in earnest. Saxophone, guitar and drums and, of course, a few pedals. Tenor man Nick Branton the (visual) focus, the trio kicked-off with North West and Lonely Woman. The Jazz Café, essentially a standards jazz venue, took a little while adjusting to the sound of Dead Hedge.
Layered, hard-blowing composed to free jazz pieces, Branton, Ballantyne and Metcalfe embodied the spirit of the 1960s American avant garde (Ayler, Coleman, Taylor). Branton rocked and rolled (physically), tenor raised to the sky, then swooping to the floor, raging. Rory Ballantyne played a black Gretsch for most of the evening; rhythmic, hammered, inventive, different; Frisell to Americana to the blues. Michael Metcalfe (an erstwhile Tyne Valley resident) is the equal of any of the new crop of brilliant British drummers. A busy hi-hat, sticks and mallets, Metcalfe breezed through complex rhythmic patterns. Eel Song, an original number impressed, and the fist set closed on Ornette’s Broadway Blues. Very, very impressive.
Second set: The confines of the Jazz Café imposed an eye-contact intimacy between the musicians and the within-touching-distance audience. Branton’s guttural exhortations maintained the momentum on Antibiotic. Metcalfe, endlessly inventive, Ballantyne knew it was going well, a contented smile amidst the intensity of it all. Monster Munch hinted at the demonic fury of other, established trios on the scene – no names, the name Dead Hedge is the name to check-out. The true tale of five in a Nissan Sunny over the AlpsDriving with John – closed the set. The Spirit of Albert Ayler was with the Dead Hedge Trio – Rejoice! From time to time a gig earns a Bebop Spoken Here nomination for Gig of the Year. It will take something special to better this Jazz Café performance by the Dead Hedge Trio.
Russell.

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Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

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