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Bebop Spoken There

Ken Peplowski: I try to play the clarinet like a clarinet and not like a guy doubling on another instrument.– (Down Beat July 2004).

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James Morrison: “I’m not a trumpet player that doubles on flugelhorn. I’m a musician that plays trumpet, flugelhorn, euphonium and the rest. – (Jazz Journal January 1992).

Archives.

Today Thursday January 19

Evening.
Maine St. Jazzmen - Potters Wheel, Sunniside, Gateshead NE16 5EE. 8:30pm. 0191 4888068.
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Tees Hot Club w. Jeremy McMurray (keys); Mark Toomey (alto). - Dorman's, Oxford Rd., Middlesbrough. 8:30pm. Free.
New Orleans Preservation Jazz Band - Oxbridge Hotel, Oxbridge Lane, Stockton on Tees. 8:30pm.
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To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Friday, July 11, 2014

Drumbeats In Gateshead Shopping Centre: Lunchtime July 9

(By Ann Alex).
The sun shone, the people listened (and clapped sometimes) as we played beside the sculpture in Gateshead shopping centre.  ‘We’ are the drummers from the Sage Silver Programme, entertaining with African and Samba drumming.  As I’ve said before on BSH, this type of activity can’t do your jazz skills any harm, learning rhythms and sequences, and working as part of a group.  I thought I detected some improvisation from the samba group, as well!  More about that later.
This year I’ve been involved with the African Drumming, playing djembes (hand drums). A different sound is produced according to whether you hit the drum on the edge or in the middle. Our first piece, which I believe is the rhythm used to introduce the news in Zimbabwe, was a complex (to me anyway) sequence.  We played parts of the sequence, stayed silent for other bits, then gradually built up until we were playing the whole sequence.  Our next piece was a series of riffs, also from Zimbabwe, which we all played together.  The last piece, my favourite, featured different rhythms played simultaneously, all based round the rhythm of a train, gradually increasing in speed, and ending with an African song, call and response, with harmonies.  Great stuff!
I can’t explain so much about the Sambanistas as I haven’t done this for the last 2 years, but they all looked summery in yellow tee shirts and colourful hats.  They play a selection of drums, large free-standing surdos, played with sticks; timbals which are higher-pitched hand drums; snare drums; and there are also agogo bells and tamborims.  This band came on first and they really got the attention of the crowd with 3 or so carnival type tunes.  After our African Drum performance, the advanced group of Sambanistas played a very skilled set, about 5 drummers, each person apparently playing individual parts. The tunes and riffs sounded complex, with some short solos from each player.  Clever stuff.
We are very grateful for the leadership of our drumming tutors, Phil Davids and Jim Montague, and if any jazzers want to join us next term, be quick, and sign up with the Sage Silver Programme.
Ann Alex

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Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

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