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Bebop Spoken There

More from Jazz Monthly:

John Postgate: "Oscar Peterson played a good solo in 1954..." - (Jazz Monthly August 1960)

Bill Evans: "A composer writes something, and an orchestra interprets it--he spends maybe six months writing 10 minutes of music, but a jazz musician spends 10 minutes of playing 10 minutes of music, and he performs it himself". - (Jazz Monthly July1960).

Archives

Today Saturday October 21

Afternoon

???????

Evening

Tees Valley Jazzmen - Sadberge Village Hall, 5 Beacon Grange Park, Sadberge, Darlington DL2 1TW. 7:30pm. £9.00. inc cheese & biscuits, BYOB.

Mat Maneri/Evan Parker/Lucian Ban: Sounding Tears - Sage Gateshead. 7:45pm. £13.50.

The Exiles - The Globe, 11 Railway St., Newcastle NE4 7AD. 8:00pm. £5.00. Line-up: Dave Hignett (trumpet), Niall Armstrong (tenor sax), Mike Cunningham (piano), Hazel Hanley (double bass) & Paul ‘Sid’ Wight (drums).

George Shovlin & the Radars - Billy Bootleggers, Nelson St, Newcastle NE1 5AN. 9:00pm. Free.

To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Monday, June 02, 2014

Zoe Gilby & Andy Champion // Paul Edis @ The Bridge Hotel. June 1

Zoe Gilby (voice) & Andy Champion (double bass); Paul Edis (keyboards).
(Review by Russell/Photos courtesy of Ken Drew)
The first day of June, a warm summer’s evening and a good turn out at the Bridge Hotel. Splinter @ the Bridge hosts Zoe Gilby and Andy Champion were looking at a blank date in the schedule with the late cancellation of the proposed gig, so, the obvious answer was to ask themselves if they were available do a voice and bass set (they were) and if a half-decent piano player could be found to play a solo set it would be problem solved. After a second’s thought Paul Edis was the obvious choice (and he was available at a reasonable fee!).
The Gilby-Champion partnership took familiar and not so familiar material and reworked it in the pared-down duo format. It freed Gilby to explore her vocal range, improvising on a lyric. The opening number – Pink Floyd’s Money – illustrated the range and dexterity of the voice and Andy Champion’s imperious technique as double bassist. The Joni Mitchell take on Mingus’ Goodbye Pork Pie Hat found favour with Gilby, the melody intact. Kate Bush’s Kashka From Baghdad, perhaps not obvious material at a jazz gig, worked, as did two standards from the repertoire – Nice Work If You Can Get It and Well, You Needn’t – the latter featuring arco bass from Champion. Nick Cave’s menacing Red Right Hand has rapidly established itself in the set list alongside The Midnight Bell (a Gilby quartet staple inspired by a Patrick Hamilton novel). As a finale Gilby invited Paul Edis to join them on a corking Straight No Chaser
Earlier Edis played solo. A set of original compositions (some available as a down load at www.pauledis.co.uk) and one or two standards held the attention of the Splinter audience. The self-deprecating Edis made light of From Nothing to Nowhere and Not Like Me, two tunes many a piano player would love to have written and performed. A Messiaen-inspired piece (a composition given the seal of approval in the cloistered environs of academe, so said Edis!), some Monk (inclusion compulsory!) and My Favourite Things made this all too short set a joy for lovers of jazz piano (the room seemingly full of them!). Giant Steps and New Distraction (Edis’ musings on the distracting iPadiPhoneiWant generation) hit the bulls-eye as subtle left hand stride patterns surfaced mid-Coltrane and mid-Edis. An element of levity rarely goes amiss and Bring Me Sunshine brought a smile to the faces of those present.     
Russell.      .                                

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Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

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