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Bebop Spoken There

Allison Neale: “It’s difficult if you play mainstream in the UK, it isn’t appreciated enough. The current scene seems to focus on musician-composers.” - (Jazz Journal April 2013).

Liam Noble: “I know some people think playing standards is old-fashioned but I love it.” – (Jazz Journal January 2016).

Archives.

Today Tuesday February 21

Jam Session - Jazz Café, 25 Pink Lane, Newcastle NE1 5DW. 8pm. Free.
Charles Gordon (solo piano) - Redwood Bar, Vermont Hotel, Newcastle. 10pm - midnight. Free.
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To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Friday, May 09, 2014

Triptych @ The Lit & Phil. May 9

Paul Edis (piano & clarinet), Paul Susans (double bass) & Rob Walker (drums/percussion)
(Review by Russell/Photos by Jerry).
Three jazz gigs at the Lit & Phil this week – Wednesday evening, Thursday evening and today’s lunch hour set – perhaps accounted for a relatively low turn-out to hear Triptych. The trio of Paul Edis (piano), Paul Susans (double bass) and drummer Rob Walker have, in a short space of time, got something going with this new line-up. The set list combined standards, traditional songs and contemporary composition. The trick is in the approach and the arrangements of once familiar tunes.
How High the Moon, familiar enough, began the one hour performance in relaxed style, the playing top notch. Middle England would, no doubt, rejoice at the prospect of Greensleeves and English Country Garden, at least until Triptych did their thing. Pianist Paul Edis gave these tunes a new twist; Bach-like, swinging sections, drummer Rob Walker seeking to sneak in a drum ‘n’ bass vibe, bassist Paul Susans suitably amused at the devilment of it all. Alice in One D Land (Edis claimed artistic licence!) and the classic Bacharach/David number Close to You featured superb playing by all three musicians. Edis’ Dark Ages rung the changes. Our premier pianist picked up his clarinet, Walker introduced the audience to his udu (a vessel with a hole in it, usually made of clay), unusual in itself, this particular African instrument was tuned to B (all the more unusual, apparently). The tune initially suggested a North African feel before moving into something to be heard in Eastern musics (Zakir Hussain and Trilok Gurtu would have got it). With clarinet having set the mood, Edis returned to the keyboard to further develop the piece. Unusual, one to be heard again.
Walker’s Mister Blister preceded Gavin Bryars’ challenging composition Jesus Blood and it was down to Walker’s fun arrangement of Honeysuckle Rose to close the concert in style. Fats’ stride classic went swing time, then drum ‘n’ bass, then this way, then that. Sight reading the twists and turns they got it right or so it seemed! Much applause, deservedly so.
Russell.

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Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

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