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Number 22 in World Jazz Blog Rankings

Number 22 in World Jazz Blog Rankings

Bebop Spoken There

Howard Riley: “When I started out playing jazz back in the late 50s, early 60s, if you wanted a gig you had to learn some standards.” – (Jazz Journal April 2017)

Eric Harland: “I love swing and I’m always going to swing but I also know that you can take a hip-hop groove and improvise with that just like you would with a swing pattern.” – (Jazz Journal April 2017)

Today Sunday April 30

All Day.
Darlington Jazz Festival - details.
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International Jazz Day - The Globe, 11 Railway St., Newcastle NE4 7AD. From 2pm 'til late. Free - details.
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Strictly Smokin' Small Band - Gateshead Beer and Music Festival - Gateshead RFC, Eastwood Gdns., Low Fell NE9 5UB. £12 admission to beer festival. Band play 1:45pm - 2:35pm.
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Afternoon.
Joel Byrne McCullough - Cherry Tree Restaurant, 9 Osborne Rd., Jesmond, Newcastle. 12:30pm. Free.
Blues @ The Bay - Tanner Smith's 17-19 South Parade, Whitley Bay NE26 2RE, 0191 2525941. 4pm. Free. Blues jam w. Scott Wall & Charlie Philp.
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Musicians Unlimited - Park Hotel, Park Rd., Hartlepool TS26 9HU. 01249 233126.1pm. Free.
Evening
Nick Ross Orchestra (Glenn Miller) - Forum Theatre, Queensway, Billingham. 7:30pm. £22 (£20.50 conc.).
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To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Wednesday, May 07, 2014

The Virtuoso Jazz Trio @ The Lit and Phil

George MacDonald (clarinet); James Birkett (guitar); Tony Abell (bass); Bernice MacDonald (vocal).
(Review by Lance.)
The clarinet is the purest toned of all instruments and, arguably, the most difficult of the single reed instruments. No other wind instrument can be played with such clarity. Admittedly there have been many maverick clarinettists to whom clarity and purity of tone were low down in their priorities - Pee Wee Russell, Archie Semple, Jimmy Giuffre, local hero the late Stan Martin were some - and they all hold their own individual place in jazz history. However, and here I'm being subjective, the true masters of the instrument were, Buster Bailey, Barney Bigard, Artie Shaw, Buddy de Franco, Eddie Daniels and, of course, Benny Goodman.
George MacDonald, a former principal clarinettist of the Northern Sinfonia, has absorbed many of the above influences and I well remember the delight he showed when, some years ago, I broke the news to him that Buddy de Franco was to appear at Caedmon Hall, Gateshead.
George was there that night. 
Tonight, on the eve of the clarinettist's 81st birthday, celebrated vocally Canadian style, his fluency and the control of his instrument showed no sign of flagging and those of us who made our way to the Lit and Phil were treated to an evening of pure magic.
Listening to such standards as Ain't Misbehavin'; After you've Gone; In Mellow tone; Airmail Special; My Blue Heaven; Someone to Watch Over Me; Flying Home; One Note Samba; Margie; I Got Rhythm; Skylark; Sweet Georgia Brown and A Nightingale Sang in Berkeley Square - each one given an interesting and often humourous introduction by George made one understand why jazz had never been more popular with the general public than it was during the Swing Era - particularly when played by Benny Goodman or, as it was tonight, by George MacDonald.
Not that George was the only swinger on stage. James Birkett laid down markers for every guitarist to aspire to. Chordal à la Kress, single string à la Charlie Christian or just plain and, not so simple, Birkett.
Tony Abell is a relatively laid back bassist but every note counted whether in solo or support. He wears the mantle vacated by Pete Stuart well.
Oh yes, and then there was Bernice! I haven't come across many girls these days who can sing in front of a band, however small, unamplified and still be heard! In fact the acoustic sound probably worked to her advantage on Gilberto numbers such as Telephone Song and Ipanema creating that delicate Astrid G feel that may have been lost if she'd been miked up.
Who knows? The girl sounded great and so did the band.
She looked good too
Lance.

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Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

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