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Bebop Spoken There

Vadim Neselovskyi, Professor of Jazz Piano, Berklee College of Music: “Every pianist has to deal with a very complex left-hand part at some point. This is the essential pianistic experience – to split your brain into two halves and execute two very different tasks at the same time.” – (Down Beat September 2017).

Roscoe Mitchell: “To me, improvisation is trying to improve your skills so you can make these on-point compositional decisions. That takes practice.” – (Down Beat September 2017)

Archives

Thursday September 21

Afternoon
Vieux Carré Jazzmen - Holystone, Whitley Rd., nr. Newcastle NE27 0DA. 1:oopm. Free.
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Tees Valley Jazzmen - White Horse Hotel, Burtree Lane, Harrowgate Hill, Darlington DL1 3AD. 1:30pm. Free. 01325 463262.

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Evening.
Maine Street Jazzmen - Potter's Wheel, Sunniside NE16 5EE. 8:30pm. Free.
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Courtney Pine: Black Notes from the Deep - Sage Gateshead NE8 2JR. 7:30pm. £25.60. 0191 4434661.
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Katie Mac (w. 6 piece band) - The Globe, 11 Railway St., Newcastle NE4 7AD. 7:30pm. Free.
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Emma Fisk & James Birkett - St. Cuthbert's Church, Shadforth DH6 1LF. 7:30pm.
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Pocket Jazz Orchestra: Jazz & Tapas - No. 60, Arc, Dovecote St., Stockton TS18 1LL. 7pm. £10.
Tees Hot Club w. Alan Marshall (saxes); Kevin Eland (trumpet); Ted Pearce (keys) - Dormans, Oxford Rd., Middlesbrough TS5 5DT. 9pm. Free.
New Orleans Preservation Jazz Band - Oxbridge, Oxbridge Lane, Stockton TS18 4AW. 8:30pm.01642 678129.
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To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Monday, April 07, 2014

GIJF: Day Three: Youth Jazz Afternoon: Stretch Trio; Jambone with Rick Taylor

Stretch Trio: Calvin Travers (guitar) Simon ? (drums), ? (tenor sax, Ewi). (Andy French? Tom Higham?)
(Review by Ann Alex/Photo from band's F/b page)).
Sorry about the names I didn’t catch, but this whole concert was an absolute joy, with free tickets as well, and I would willingly have paid.  Stretch Trio, from Yorkshire, were handpicked by ‘Jazz North Introduces’ which gives young Northern jazz artists their first high profile performance. The trio were straight in with sax leading, a pleasing ethereal sound, then riffs and chops, a fresh modern approach to jazz, sax and guitar duetting, alternating, music speeding up towards the end of the piece.  
Next came Solstice, a tune with a more spaced out feel, using some sort of looped electronics, but as appropriate.  The Ewi made an appearance, the Electronic Wind Instrument, to give it its full title. This looks like a shiny melodica and sounds as you’d expect from the title. It reflected the coloured stage lights as it was played, so looked attractive as well.  Next, something a bit more traditional, a standard start with a drum solo, and references to the song Softly As In A Morning Sunrise.  The set ended with Hectic Metric, a full throttled sound and lots of chock, chock sounds from percussion.  There were murmurs of appreciation from the audience, so I think we’ll be hearing more of this young band.
Jambone; The Time Machine: led by Rick Taylor (trombone)
We were prepared for the high standards that we’ve come to expect from Jambone, Sage Gateshead’s youth jazz ensemble, but I for one wasn’t prepared for the hilarious presentation methods of Rick Taylor, a local jazz musician who has been away from the area for some time.  The Time Machine is the result of a long workshop that Rick did with the band, which is based on key jazz and swing composers and arrangers.  He explained, with down to earth honesty, that the workshop was long so they’d cut down the performance to the minimum, then proceeded to vigorously conduct  what sounded, for all the world, like a chaotic drunken version of New Orleans jazz.  Then we were straight into danceable swing, led by Rick’s wonderful trombone, encouraging the many soloists in the band, saxes, trumpet, drums.  The piece was in sections to illustrate trends, such as West Coast Style with a skilled baritone sax solo, then a lively mid 50’s tune counterbalanced by smooth tones.  The third movement illustrated Duke Ellington, with a very deliberately piercing muted trumpet, which Rick assured us was authentic for the time.  Stan Kenton entered the scene, then more West Coast with a chance for guitar and piano to solo.  The final piece (sorry can’t remember the influence) reminded me of the soundtrack to many a 1950’s cowboy film. I imagine the band must have had good fun during the workshop, with much encouragement to give of their best, which they did in this performance.
Ann Alex

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Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

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