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Bebop Spoken There

Grant Green Jr.: "One thing that most people--especially jazz cats--don't realise is that all of your jazz standards were once pop standards" - DownBeat July 2018).

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Bobby Sanabria: "Tito Puente was not a very tall man, but when he played the timbales he was a giant among men." - DownBeat July 2018).

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Voting is now taking place for Nominations in the All Party Parliamentary Jazz Awards. Please take this opportunity to vote in the various categories including MEDIA where a vote for Bebop Spoken Here would be much appreciated.

Today Thursday June 21

Afternoon

Vieux Carré Jazzmen - Holystone, Whitley Road, Holystone NE27 0DA. Tel: 266 6173. 1:00pm. Free.

Evening

Maine St. Jazzmen - Sunniside Social Club, Holywell Lane, Sunniside, Gateshead NE16 5NJ. 8:30pm. Free.

Indigo Jazz Voices - The Globe, 11 Railway Street, Newcastle NE4 7AD. 7:30pm. £5.00.

Lambton Little Band - Prohibition Bar, Arch 3, Brandling Street, Gateshead NE8 2BA. 7:00pm. Free. Rehearsal session.

Lindsay Hannon Plus - St James’ & St Basil’s Church, Fenham, Newcastle NE4 9EJ. 7:30pm. £10.00.

Charlotte Glasson Group - Jazz Café, Pink Lane, Newcastle NE1 5DW. Tel: 0191 222 9882. 8:00pm. £10.00. (£8.00. concs.). JNE.

Get in the Band rehearsal - Sage Gateshead, St Mary’s Square, Gateshead Quays, Gateshead NE8 2JR. Tel: 0191 443 4666. 6:00-10:00pm. Second of two rehearsals under the direction of Chris Sharkey culminating in three performances in a day on Sat 23 June - 1) Great North Museum (Hancock Museum), 2) Central Station, 3) Sage Gateshead. Times TBC. Free but ticketed.

New Orleans Preservation Jazz Band - Oxbridge, Oxbridge Lane, Stockton on Tees TS18 4AW. 8:30pm.

Tees Hot Club w. Ray Dales (alto); Dave Stansfield (tenor); Bruce Taylor (keys) - Dorman’s Club, Oxford Road, Middlesbrough TS5 5DT. Tel: 01642 823813. 9pm. Free.

Jazz Jam - Fire Station, High Street West, Sunderland SR1 3DT. Tel: 0191 594 7241. 8pm. Free.

Billy's Buskers: Plug in and Play - Billy Bootleggers, Nelson St, Newcastle NE1 5AN. 7:00pm. Free.

To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Monday, April 28, 2014

Darlington Jazz Festival. Saturday Afternoon April 26

(Review by Russell)
This year’s Darlington Jazz Festival, the third, incorporated a new, additional venue across town at the Head of Steam (Darlington Railway Museum). Gigs at the Forum Music Centre on Borough Road have become an established part of the region’s jazz scene - the venue hosted an eve of festival workshop and a full day of jazz - and the opportunity to showcase the music at other venues showed commendable ambition.
Trumpeter Matt Roberts led a Thursday evening workshop, participants ranging from pre-teens to sprightly octogenarians, and the results of their efforts would be heard on Sunday afternoon at the Railway Museum.
Saturday, the first full day of action, got underway at one o’clock with an array of the musicians of tomorrow on stage in the main hall. Durham County Youth Big Band (MD Shaune Eland) don’t do things by half. A quick head count mustered something like seven reeds, six trombones, six trumpets and a rhythm section of piano, guitar, bass and drums. All did themselves proud during a varied programme (Mercy, Mercy, Mercy and Cantaloupe Island to name but two). Matt Roberts joined the ensemble on flugel on the latter number. The weekend’s big draw - Mark Nightingale - took time out to listen to the band (the trombones passed with flying colours) then suggested he join them on his own composition Carnifest! An occasion none of those present will ever forget.
From big band stars of tomorrow to an established duo of today. In the bar Zoe Gilby and Andy Champion performed a voice and bass set of jazz standards (Goodbye Pork Pie Hat, Nice Work If You Cab Get It, Well You Needn’t) to cotemporary pieces from the likes of Kate Bush (Kashka From Baghdad) and Tom Waits (Way Down in the Hole). The set opener set the standard. Pink Floyd’s Money illustrated Gilby’s vocal dexterity and Champion’s imperious technique. First rate, as always. Pianist Jamil Sheriff arrived in good time to play a set in the hall with Pete Turner (double bass) and drummer Dave Walsh. The room wasn’t full (the same spot during last year’s event featuring James Mainwaring experienced the same thing) but it should have been because this was jazz piano trio playing at its best. Applause sporadic, the jazz terrific. I’ll Remember April and Pannonica respected the tunes yet all three musicians stretched out in absorbing improvisatory sections. Original compositions were heard - Bluish (great left hand), a swinging Crazy Happy, Trio Piece No.1 and The Contortionist – and those who were there to hear them loved them. A quality set.
Tyneside’s Debra Milne Ensemble returned once more to the Forum to play a set in the bar. Festival goers keen to slake a thirst made for a typical ‘social occasion’ hubbub. The musicians all too aware of the situation got on with it and hit the ground running with Billie’s Bounce. Vocalist Milne’s song-writing partner guitarist Steve Glendinning and redoubtable bassist Paul Grainger taking the solos. Blame Game (comp. Milne and Glendinning) has become something of a fixture in the set list, Killer Joe is certainly that and Betty Carter’s Tight was as described - tight! The man at the back - drummer Tim Johnston - provided the propulsive fuel, Grainger the swing, Glendinning the comprehensive solo flights and Milne the post-bop, sometime original, lyric.
The afternoon session concluded with a roaring big band set from the Darlington Big Band. On home turf, bandleader Richie Emmerson was on first name terms with more than a few in the audience with many a wise crack from stage and floor. Structural engineers were called in after the first number Younger Than Springtime. The culprit responsible for the damage to the building’s foundations being none other than powerhouse trumpeter Kevin Eland. The Thrill Is Gone (‘Aye, it is’  confessed a lone voice) heard thrilling trumpet playing from Young Contender Tom Hill (were we in Darlington or Jericho?). East of the Sun to Collaboration (a feature for Dave Brocklesby, trombone) to a new number for the band - Oliver Nelson’s Full Nelson - featuring tremendous tenor from MD Emmerson, the ensemble and soloists hit the bull’s eye. Ace composer/arranger Gordon Goodwin regularly gets a name-check on Bebop Spoken Here but to appear in the same sentence as Tim Rice and Elton John must be a first!  The Great Phat One rearranged the Rice/John tune I Just Can’t Wait to be King from the film The Lion King. Trumpeter Mick Hill showed Hill Jr that there is life in the old dog yet and Andy Bennett (alto) tore it up. Bennett, no slouch on clarinet, led the march on St Louis Blues before switching back to alto to tear it up a second time on Stolen Moments. A great set, the band returned to the bar to celebrate.
Russell.

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Whilst we appreciate the many emails, texts, messages and other communications we receive requesting album/gig reviews on BSH, regrettably, we are unable to reply to them all other than those we are able to answer with a positive response.
Similarly, CDs received by post will only be considered if accompanied by sufficient background material.
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Lance

About this blog - contact details.

Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

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