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Bebop Spoken There

Vadim Neselovskyi, Professor of Jazz Piano, Berklee College of Music: “Every pianist has to deal with a very complex left-hand part at some point. This is the essential pianistic experience – to split your brain into two halves and execute two very different tasks at the same time.” – (Down Beat September 2017).

Roscoe Mitchell: “To me, improvisation is trying to improve your skills so you can make these on-point compositional decisions. That takes practice.” – (Down Beat September 2017)

Archives

Today Friday September 22

Scarborough Jazz Festival - Day one of three.
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Afternoon
Rendezvous Jazz - The Black Horse, Front St., Monkseaton, Whitley Bay NE25 8DP. 1pm. Free.
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Zoe Gilby Quartet - Town Hall, Market Place, Bishop Auckland DL14 7NP. 1pm. £5.
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Evening
Kentucky Cowtippers - Billy Bootleggers, 28 Nelson St., Newcastle NE1 5AN. 9pm. Free.
Sean Noonan: Memorable Sticks - Jazz Café, 25 Pink Lane, Newcastle NE1 5DW. 8pm. £8/£6.
Backyard Rhythm Orchestra + Monkey Puzzle - o2 Academy, Newcastle. Doors 6:30pm. Curfew 10pm.
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Dave Newton & Dean Stockdale - Traveller's Rest, 2 West Auckland Rd., Cockerton, Darlington DL3 9ER. 8:30pm. £10.
Smokin' Spitfires - Forum Music Centre, Borough Rd., Darlington DL1 1SG. 7:30pm. £10.
Steve Bone - Al Forno, 81 Skinnergate, Darlington DL3 7LX. 7pm.
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To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Friday, March 14, 2014

Celebrating Roy @ The Bridge Hotel. March 11

Nick Malcolm (trumpet) & Roger Turner (percussion)
(Review by Russell/Photo courtesy of Ken Drew.)
Late last year Jazz North East secured a return visit in 2014 by American free jazz trumpeter Roy Campbell to perform in a duo with British drummer Roger Turner. In January Campbell died at the age of sixty one. The Tyneside promoters had a decision to make – scrap the date altogether or attempt to stage something in memory of the man. An invitation extended to young British trumpeter Nick Malcolm was readily accepted and the pairing of Malcolm and Roger Turner would, it was hoped, be a fitting tribute to Roy Campbell.
Drummer Roger Turner had played on Tyneside on many occasions, his pedigree not in doubt. Nick Malcolm was known to the select few who had heard him a little over a year ago leading his own quartet at the Bridge Hotel. A fabulous player, would those unaware of his abilities turn out to hear him on this auspicious occasion? In the event, most stayed away. They missed a great performance by Malcolm and nothing short of a master class from Turner. A brass player suffering from a heavy cold doesn’t bode well, the more so in the exposed duo format. Fearless, if nothing else, Nick Malcolm went for it. Roger Turner didn’t make allowances for his ailing partner – play up, play on.
The nature of free jazz found Malcolm working hard for forty five minutes, the only respite came as Turner played unaccompanied for a period. Malcolm didn’t shirk but he did cough and splutter, guttural gestures triggering a coughing fit, similarly, full on blowing leaving him gasping for breath. Turner’s technique, honed over the years, is an audio-visual treat. Great sound, great feel, watching him do it is an education. Drummers were thin on the ground, perhaps they were gigging, perhaps not. If in the latter category then they should have been at the Bridge.
The second set proved to be a shorter affair; one piece, ending as it did with neither musician having anything further to say. Such is the form, there is no set list, no preconceptions, simply start playing then cease playing. A really good gig for those interested in the music. Roy Campbell would surely have approved.        
Russell.      

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Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

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