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Bebop Spoken There

Howard Riley: “When I started out playing jazz back in the late 50s, early 60s, if you wanted a gig you had to learn some standards.” – (Jazz Journal April 2017)

Eric Harland: “I love swing and I’m always going to swing but I also know that you can take a hip-hop groove and improvise with that just like you would with a swing pattern.” – (Jazz Journal April 2017)

Today Thursday April 27

Afternoon
Vieux Carré Jazzmen - The Holystone, Whitley Rd., Holystone, Newcastle (ish) NE27 0DA. 1pm. Free.
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Evening.
Maine St. Jazzmen - Potters Wheel, Sunniside, Gateshead NE16 5EE. 8:30pm. 0191 4888068
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Dave Weisser & Alan Law - The Globe, 11 Railway St., Newcastle NE4 7AD. 8pm. £5. (Students free).
BABMUS Presents - Jazz Café, 25 Pink Lane, Newcastle NE1 5DW. 8pm. £3 (£2 students).
Strictly Smokin' Big Band - The Millstone, Haddrick's Mill Rd., South Gosforth, Newcastle NE3 3DB. Free. 7pm. Open rehearsal.
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Emma Fisk's Hot Club du Nord - Lubetkin Theatre, East Durham College, Willerby Grove, Peterlee SR8 2RR.7pm. £8. 07425 145549.
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Paul Skerritt Band - The Pennyweight, Bakehouse Hill, Darlington DL1 5QA. 9pm. Free. 01325 468411.
Jazz Workshop w. Matt Roberts - Art Gallery, Crown St., Darlington DL1 1ND. 6pm. £5. Registration required. Part of Darlington Jazz Festival.
Richie Emmerson Quartet w Richie (tenor); Ted Pearce (keys); Alan Smith (bass) + drums tba - Dorman's, Oxford Rd., Middlesbrough. 9pm. Free.
New Orleans Preservation Jazz Band - The Oxbridge, Oxbridge Lane, Stockton on Tees. 8:30pm.
Pocket Jazz Orchestra + Noel Dennis (trumpet) - The Ship, Church Lane, Redmarshall, Stockton TS21 1EP. Free. 8pm.
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To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Thursday, February 13, 2014

Jeux de Mots! Djangologie @ Bishop Auckland Town Hall. Wednesday February 12.

Mick Shoulder (bass), Emma Fisk (violin), Giles Strong  (guitar) and James Birkett (guitar).
(Review photos by Jerry E.)
It began inauspiciously: had we encountered three witches and a cauldron between car-park and Town Hall, I’d not have been surprised! Even inside, the wind howled and thrummed in the rafters and the curtains behind the stage wafted ominously!
It was a good turn-out though and from the off the audience, having unwrapped more layers than I’ve seen since returning from a visit to Estonia, was rapt – “too rapt” during Dinah, according to Mick! He urged applause and, solo by solo, they “un-rapt” to the extent that he seemed almost to “tut” after one unseemly bout of premature Mick-adulation before he’d finished his solo! “There’s no pleasing him,” said Emma.
But we were pleased by Douce Ambience in which Giles “did something contrapuntal” (it’s legal in Bishop!) and by Feuille d’Automne and Nuages. During the quiet, melancholic coda to this last, the wind made its presence felt as “fifth member” of the band: for the most part, fortunately, the strumming guitars and tapping feet managed to drown it out. Music conquers all?

When introducing the players Mick clarified his rhyming references to Emma as the “ship’s porcupine,” which explanation I will not go into here. I did notice, however, that by the second-half intros she was simply “Miss Emma Fisk”. Simply brilliant on her solos, if you ask me, as indeed were they all at various points in the gig.
Many of the tunes were familiar to me: Hun o Pani Naschella; Songe d’Automne; Artillerie Lourde; Minor Swing and the breakneck Stompin’ at Decca. Later there followed: Sheikh of Araby; Veish a No Drom; Mira Prau (?) and Les Yeux Noirs. As well as these old friends, there were at least two which were entirely new to me: Cigano Bolero and Blues for D.R., both Mick originals and both very welcome additions to what is already a great repertoire. Cigano (= gypsy in Portuguese) Bolero had Giles Strong taking the lead while James Birkett strummed a soft Latin rhythm and Emma Fisk’s violin was softly lyrical. A beautiful tune! Blues for D.R. had a slow opening such as Django might have produced after a sabbatical in the Delta before going up-tempo in another wind-cheating blast.
And, through the soothing encore, Dans mon Endroit Tranquil, the wind was still ironically vocal but we scarcely noticed, rapt still (O.E.D. - 1]completely fascinated 2] filled with an intense and pleasurable emotion).
My friends, guitar-enthusiasts both, bought CD’s before they left – with only a few hints from Mick and the “Big Lad” on the door! It really was that good.
Jerry

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Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

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