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Bebop Spoken There

Michelle Coltrane: "It was Geri Allen who told me, 'Why don't you work with a guitar player? It's a lot easier. They're mobile, all the pianos are out of tune'" - DownBeat March 2018.

Verneri Pohjola: “I've been trying to get away from being 'a young and promising trumpet player' for over twenty years” DownBeat March 2018.

Today Tuesday February 20

Afternoon

Classic Swing - The Ship, Front St., Monkseaton NE25 8DP. 1pm. Free.

Evening

Jam Session - Jazz Café, 25 Pink Lane, Newcastle NE1 5DW. 8pm. Free.

To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Monday, February 10, 2014

Tom Harrison/Jamie Taylor Quartet @ The Bridge Hotel, Newcastle. February 9

Tom Harrison (alto); Jamie Taylor (guitar); Conor Chaplin (bass); David Lyttle (drums).
(Review by Lance)
In a perfect world the Splinter session at the Bridge, last night, would have been chockablock with sax players jostling with guitarists, bassists and drummers for a front row seat.
In a perfect world.
As it turned out there were none of the aforementioned breed and very few other species either. You could in fact almost count the audience on Django's left hand.
Why was this? The nearest competing gig was 30 miles away. Still, for the elite few who bothered to turn out they can not be blamed for adopting an air of superiority over those who stayed at home. You can't win the Lottery if you don't buy a ticket and last night we hit the jackpot!
The prize was some of the best music heard at the Bridge in many a moon. Unfair to single out any of the four - they all contributed equally.
In the beginning there was Johnny Dankworth who begat Joe Harriot who begat Pete King who begat Alan Barnes who begat Tom Harrison - the latest in a long line of British alto saxophonists. Jamiie Taylor proved you don't need a tray of effects pedals to produce meaningful guitar jazz, David Lyttle, Ireland's number one kitman, can do more with his fingers than many drummers can with a pair of Vic Firth's finest whilst Conor Chaplin made us realise the rhythmic and the melodic potential of the double bass.
The material, tried and tested classics with ne'er a chart or Fake Book app in sight.
Like Someone in Love; My Little Suede Shoes; Skylark; Things Ain't What They Used to be: Conception; In a Mellow Tone; Body and Soul; Stolen Moments
Lance.

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Whilst we appreciate the many emails, texts, messages and other communications we receive requesting album/gig reviews on BSH, regrettably, we are unable to reply to them all other than those we are able to answer with a positive response.
Similarly, CDs received by post will only be considered if accompanied by sufficient background material.
Finally, bear in mind that this is a jazz-based site when submitting your album.
Lance

About this blog - contact details.

Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

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