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Bebop Spoken There

Artie Shaw: “I'm not interested in giving people what they want--I'm interested in making music.” – (DownBeat October 15, 1939).

Jason Marsalis: “There's so many places that this music can go and there's a lot yet to be discovered.'” – (DownBeat April 2018)

Today Sunday March 18


Musicians Unlimited - Park Inn, Park Road, Hartlepool TS26 9HU. Tel: 01429 233126. 12 noon. Free.

Jason Isaacs & the Ambassadors of Swing - Hoochie Coochie, Pilgrim Street, Newcastle NE1 6SF. Tel: 0191 222 0130. 5:30pm (doors 4:00pm). £16.00.

Revolutionaires - Tyne Bar, Maling St, Newcastle NE6 1LP. 3pm. Free.

Somethin’ Blue - Vesuvio, 3a Houndgate, Darlington DL1 5RL. 5:00pm. Tel: 01325 788564. Matt Case (saxophone) & Mike Hepple (guitar).


POSTPONED DUE TO WEATHER! Zoë Gilby Quartet - Black Bull, Bridge Street, Blaydon NE21 4JJ. 8:00pm. £5.00. Rescheduled August 19.

Alter Ego - The Globe, 11 Railway Street, Newcastle NE4 7AD. 7:30pm. £5.00.

Bradley Johnston - The Fire Station, High Street West, Sunderland SR1 3DT. Tel: 0191 594 7241. 6:00pm. Free. New weekly residency.

Gypsy Dave Smith - Billy Bootleggers, Nelson St, Newcastle NE1 5AN. 9:00pm. Free.

To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Tuesday, June 11, 2013

Preview: Gwyneth Herbert - The Sea Cabinet - Sage Gateshead Wednesday June 12

Gwyneth Herbert released her new album The Sea Cabinet, on the 20th May 2013. 
The Sea Cabinet, the singer’s sixth album and her first in three years, was launched with four nights at Wilton’s Music Hall – the oldest surviving music hall in the world. 
Her subsequent tour, her first in four years, will start at Sage Gateshead and culminate in a show at Snape Maltings, where the whole project was conceived and recorded. A second tour has already been confirmed for the autumn.
Gwyneth Herbert may be only 31, but the singer and songwriter had already lived several lives when she decamped from her Dalston flat for a week in a Suffolk cottage as part of an artistic residency with Aldeburgh Music. Evenings were dedicated to midnight seaside walks, including a trip to the drowned village of Dunwich, and befriending fishermen in the local tavern. Days, meanwhile, were spent at the piano, down the road in Snape Maltings. She was nursing a broken heart, and – the finishing touch – it was blowing such a gale that she was forced to play in fingerless gloves.
Gwyneth emerged from her week in Aldeburgh with a spectacular concept album: The Sea Cabinet. ‘The songs weave themselves around the imagined story of a woman who walks the beach every day alone,’ she explains, ‘picking up all the discarded and washed up objects and taking them home, logging them with archeological rigour. She keeps them in a shack: her "sea cabinet." These items are kind of semaphore signals and each one resonates with the memory of a secret sea-set story.’
A full decade after her debut album First Songs, The Sea Cabinet finds Gwyneth at her most mature as a writer.  The songs, inspired by the Suffolk coast, are timeless and immersive. And the album, knitted together by field recordings, is as unbroken as a shoreline. The Sea Cabinet calls to mind English folk artists from Jacqui McShee to Tunng. There are also touches of Joni Mitchell in Mingus mode, Edith Piaf and the leftfield pop of Psapp, not to mention Ray Davies and Mara Carlyle. Gwyneth herself says would put the record on the shelf marked bluesyfolkypoppyjazzystorysongs – but, as on the album itself, she’s only half-serious.
‘I like music that stokes a fire in your belly, starts a storm in your brain, punches you in the face and tickles you under the chin at the same time,’ she says. ‘The Sea Cabinet may be a concept album, but I don’t want it to sound like I’ve got my head stuck up my arse. I want the experience of listening to it to be fun – because we had so much fun making it. Like the song of faded seaside hotel The Regal slips into the melodica refrain of I Do Like To Be Beside The Seaside. It's whimsy that takes itself seriously.’
Album centrepiece  Fishguard Ladies takes its inspiration from the late 18th century, when, legend has it, a handful of local Welsh women headed off an invading French fleet by flashing their red petticoats. They were apparently mistaken for British Grenadiers. Alderney, by contrast, tells the chilling story of the Channel Island following its occupancy by Nazis during World War Two. Elsewhere we have the tender chamber folk of The Regal and, in Drink, a rum-soaked sea shanty.  Alongside pop artist Fiona Bevan who collaborates on I Still Hear the Bells and The King’s Shilling, the album also features Gwyneth herself on piano and ukulele, multi-instrumentalist folk duo The Rubber Wellies and her regular band: Al Cherry (guitars), Sam Burgess (bass) and David Price (percussion, strings and co-production).
Gwyneth is relishing the fact that, in 2013, a musician’s artistic remit can – and should – extend well beyond the music Gwyneth is relishing the fact that, in 2013, a musician’s artistic remit can – and should – extend well beyond the music itself. Crowd-funded and self-released, with shows (at The Sage, Love Supreme and Snape Maltings) that feature prose, multiple voices and live cymatic projections, The Sea Cabinet is the most ambitious project she has ever attempted. And she is, she says, more creatively fulfilled than ever. 
"one of the most beguiling collections of songs you'll hear this year" 4/5 JAZZWISE
"a precious find - a fluid fusion of music, art, storytelling and film inspired by solitary shoreline walks, nautical trinkets and tales from the deep blue sea." VOGUE
"delightfully whimsical" THE TIMES
"Each of the songs is an impressively crafted, well-observed and engrossing vignette....  Simply a triumph" 5/5 MORNING STAR
"a cabaret approach to storytelling…a cabinet of curiosities" 4/5 INDEPENDENT ON SUNDAY
"a manner of modernised Music Hall, awash with ukelele and melodica" 4/5 THE FINANCIAL TIMES
"an entertaining and often moving show that opens a new chapter in her creative story" 4/5 THE GUARDIAN
"an audacious, sometimes riotous sound to frequently thrill to" MARLBANK
"In its lovingly-produced completeness, this album is a work of art" CRY ME A TORCH SONG

Tour dates
23rd - 26th: Sea Cabinet Album Launch Extravaganza, London, Wiltons Music Hall –
12th - Gateshead, The Sage -
14th - Altrincham, Cinnamon Club -
15th - Wiltshire, The Wiltshire Jazz Festival -
“Sparky, imaginative writing.  A series of twilight characters is unveiled in melodic, acoustic arrangements, full of shifting textures and moods,  Her singing is classy throughout…”  Mojo
“’All The Ghosts’ is the assertion of a highly personal musical voice, with shifting metres, contrasting backgrounds, and lyrics that actually mean something.” **** Jazzwise
 "There's a lovely sense of britishness about this girl, not only is she a talent vocally but a strong songstress too." 8/10 Blues & Soul
“Herbert’s most varied and engaging piece of personal storytelling yet.”  **** The Guardian 
 “Beautiful, vaguely jazzy, keenly observed vignettes… super-talented” **** The Daily Telegraph
“Herbert remains tricky to categorise but fantastically easy to warm to.” **** Metro
 "Builds on the charming, lo-fi, folk-pop of her lauded  'Between Me And The Wardrobe’ - plenty of memorable hooks and witty one-liners."  Time Out
 "If Hanns Eisler had been a woman and written with Ray Davies, he might have come up with something like this.."  Independent On Sunday
“a warm sultry take on acoustic folk and pop." The Daily Mail
"set to be a major sound this summer" Stella
 “Full of shifting tempos and textures.  Classic Bowie-like pop, belting blues and gorgeous jazz. The Times
"delightfully diverse and unpredictable" ALBUM OF THE WEEK Sunday Mercury
GWYNETH HERBERT – Between Me And The Wardrobe (BLUE NOTE) 2007:
"Halfway between Janis Ian and Susanna And The Magical Orchestra"
"Introspective and wistful"
"An impressive, at times moving album which defies and genre pigeon-holing - Ms Herbert could yet be up there with the artists she truly admires"
"Brilliantly original, full of space and isolated detail."
Mojo Rising
"Personal, witty, urbane, unpredictable and full of subtly poetic narrative that stands up on its own terms without recourse to genre conventions."
"Warm melodies, honeyed vocals and brilliant observational lyrics."
"Her exquisite, pure toned voice hovers between moodiness and rapture."
"Dark and moody balladry gives way to Jacques Brel-esque excitement throughout"
"Herbert’s originals connect more with Janis Ian or Rufus Wainwright than the standards the subtly intelligent Herbert at first seemed destined for."
"The pensive numbers that dominate here similarly come out of the Joni Mitchell end of the repertoire"
"Gwyneth Herbert’s guileless, low-budget album has emerged one of this year’s word-of-mouth hits, with Herbert poised as one of Britain’s brightest young talents."
"a set of very personal songs on which she often sounds closer to Sandy Denny 
than Sarah Vaughn. "
"many of these songs are compacted narrative jewels. Full of unexpected and highly rewarding details. Recommended"


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Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: I look forward to hearing from you.