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Bebop Spoken There

Grant Green Jr.: "One thing that most people--especially jazz cats--don't realise is that all of your jazz standards were once pop standards" - DownBeat July 2018).

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Bobby Sanabria: "Tito Puente was not a very tall man, but when he played the timbales he was a giant among men." - DownBeat July 2018).

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Today Monday June 25

Afternoon.

Jazz in the Afternoon - Cullercoats Crescent Club, 1 Hudleston, Cullercoats NE30 4QS. Tel: 0191 253 0242. 1:00pm. Free.

Evening

?????

To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Wednesday, April 24, 2013

Darlington Jazz Festival @ The Forum. Day 2 April 21, 2013.

(Review by Russell).
Day two of the second Darlington Jazz Festival dawned early for some (9.15.am) with  registrations being taken for a workshop at ten o’clock Trumpeter Matt Roberts led the session. An early afternoon public performance featured so many participants they could just about squeeze onto the stage in the main hall. The students spanned the generations   (reeds, trombones, trumpets and a lively rhythm section). The inspirational Roberts did a remarkable job in knocking into shape a disparate group of keen jazzers in no time at all. Two pieces  - Sonny Moon for Two and Now’s the Time - gave everyone the opportunity to take the spotlight; some taking as little as two bars or for those at a more advanced level a well-crafted solo. Each and every contribution mattered and for them to give it a go in front of an audience was to their credit. The audience certainly let them know they were appreciated. What a great start to the day!
Lickety Split, Tyneside’s ace exponents of all things West Coast, presented a polished set of classic numbers. Bag’s Groove, Squeasy Magee, a tip-of-the-hat to Clifford Brown with Kevin Eland (trumpet/flugel) a joy to listen to (Blues March and Joyspring), 88 Basie Street, So What and Four made for a great set. Trombonist Eddie Bellis has put together a fine combo with Eland, Richie Emmerson (tenor) depping for Alan Marshall, Roy Willis (guitar), Bill Brittain (keyboards), Alan Rudd (electric bass) and drummer Paul Wight all committed to the music the bandleader loves to play. The all-too-short set concluded with Cedar Walton’s Bolivia. Any jazz club looking to book a West Coast/Basie/50’s Miles outfit need look no further.
The one session scheduled for the bar/café area on day two of the festival didn’t happen due to Dougie Pugh being indisposed. More of that later. In the main hall South Shields’ finest - the Customs House Big Band - did a sound check as the room filled to capacity eager to hear more big band sounds. Led by Peter Morgan (bass trombone), the band roared into action with Love for Sale. All sections fired first time.. Altoist Jill Brett, first-call tenor dep Richie Emmerson, trumpeter Michael Lamb and drummer Paul Wight, fresh from his stint with Lickety Slpit (quality brush work with LS), booted it along. Just Friends, But Beautiful (Brett featured) and Fever worked all sections with MD Morgan seemingly content as he took his place in the ranks.
The imperious Ruth Lambert joined the band to sing a few numbers - Teach Me Tonight and Cheek to Cheek were but two of the highlights. The latter had it all; great arrangement, sensitive brush work from Wight, a concise contribution from guitarist Roy Willis, muted trumpet from Lamb and tasteful trombone courtesy of Chris Kurji-Smith. And of course, Ms Lambert.
Sing Sang Sung guaranteed the band left the stage with it all Sing Sang Sung. Job done. That was that. Festival finished for another year. Well, sort of…the regular Sunday night Jazz Club session at the Forum followed acting as an unofficial, extended encore to the main event. Two young bands and a senior outfit crammed in a lot of music over three hours. The Little Big Band acts as a feeder band to the Durham County Youth Band. Young, developing musicians, they gained invaluable experience and no little confidence, playing to a packed room with siblings, parents, grand parents and friends present to give vociferous support to all on stage. All were stars as they got stuck into their programme which included Stompin’ at the Savoy, Splanky and Watermelon Man. The senior band - Darlington Big Band – has been around the block a few times. Led by Richie Emmerson, they know their stuff and draw inspiration (and some charts!) from the likes of arrangers and composers Bill Holman, Stan Kenton and Lennie Niehaus. Fascinatin’ Rhythm, Wave (feat. trombonist Dave Brocklesby), Meaning of the Blues (a trumpet feature for Bob Temple), Norwegian Wood (Brocklesby and altoist Andy Bennett in the spotlight), Pegasus and After You’ve Gone were performed with love and care. The band gets together infrequently so, the next time they perform make the effort to catch them. The day drew to a close with the stars of tomorrow. Reckless Brass formed in 2012. The band members did a workshop with the Soul Rebels (on a visit from America) and were so inspired they formed their own band! New Orleans street brass funk just about sums them up. A high energy performance (much mopping of brows) from the brass - reeds - keys - guitar - percussion ensemble had them dancing in the isles! 5-0-4-0, Sir Duke, The Chicken, Day Tripper (yeah!), Spain (Matt Roberts joined the party for this one) and the Soul Rebels’ We Got That Fire made for a fitting finale to a fantastic weekend. To return to the session that never was. The non appearance of local legend Dougie Pugh meant there was a vacant spot to be filled. A few heads got together and a rhythm section assembled in the bar. Not just any rhythm section mind you, this was the Jazz Tones’ rhythm section - Steve McGarvie (keyboards), Amy Baker (bass) and Stephen Fletcher (drums) and they were joined, variously, by a frontline made in Jazz Heaven. Johnny Dunn (trumpet/flugelhorn), Matt Roberts (trumpet), Chris Hibbard (trombone) and Alex Baker (tenor). As is often the way in the bar at a festival the punters don’t necessarily give the music and the musicians their full attention. On this occasion by the end of the first number everyone was listening. The impromptu set list - A Night in Tunisia, Watermelon Man, Stella by Starlight (Dunn on flugel) and Blue Monk just some of the tunes - gives an indication of the sort of session this was, but only an indication. This was and is this reviewer’s Gig of the Year. Bravura frontline playing had old hands listening intently, then cheering, then listening. What a session! The best playing heard in many a year, anywhere. To think the set wasn’t a scheduled event. Brilliant, simply brilliant. Darlington Jazz Festival is the friendly jazz festival. Shaune Eland and co (so many of them, they know who they are) put on a great show. Darlington Jazz Festival 2014 can’t come soon enough.
Russell.                                                          

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Whilst we appreciate the many emails, texts, messages and other communications we receive requesting album/gig reviews on BSH, regrettably, we are unable to reply to them all other than those we are able to answer with a positive response.
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Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

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