Total Pageviews

Bebop Spoken There

Richie Havens: "Music is not my whole world. I sing a little, I play a little and I talk a lot. I can do woodwork, I draw, I can sweep, and so on." - (Down Beat February 8, 1968).

Dick Hyman: “He was a terrific tenor [saxophone] player, though the world would know him [Horace Silver] as a great pianist.” – (Down Beat September 2014).

Bebop Spoken There Archives.

Today Tuesday September 16.

Afternoon.
PAUL's NEW ORLEANS MUSIC SHOW - Bell & Bucket, 37 Norfolk St., North Shields. 1pm. Free.
Classic New Orleans with the MISSISSIPPI DREAMBOATS.
-----
Evening.
JAM SESSION - Jazz Café, Pink Lane, Newcastle NE1 5SG. 8pm. Free.
Come and jam with Peter Gilligan, Paul Grainger & Paul Wight.First and third Tuesdays - Tonight's the night!
-----
MAINE ST. JAZZMEN - British Legion, West Jesmond (nr. Metro Station). 8:30pm. £5.
Always a stomping good session.
-----
GAVIN LEE's DIXIELAND JAZZ BAND - New Inn, 29 Church St., Durham. DH1 3DN. 9pm. Free.
Gavin's bands are always interesting and this is well worth the trip.
-----
HENRY'S SWING CLUB - Brandling Villa, South Gosforth. 8.30pm. Free.
Monthly Blues Jam next one Oct. 7!
-----
PAUL SKERRITT BAND - Park Inn, Park Rd., Hartlepool TS28 9HU. 9pm. Free.
Last Tuesday in the month - Back on Sept. 30
-----
IMPROV WORKSHOP- Jazz Café, Pink Lane, Newcastle NE1 5SG. 8pm. Free.
Develop your skills with top players.
Monthly - Back October 14.
-----
JAZZ CLUB - Saltburn Conservative Club, Saltburn by the Sea. 8.30pm. Free.
Ian Bosworth (gtr); Jeff Aucott (Hammond); John Sparrow (dms); Adrian Beadnell (bs) + guests.
Jazz returns in October.

Monday, August 31, 2009

Vieux Carré Jazzmen @ The Corner House

Mike Durham (tpt/vcl), Barry Soulsby (clt/vcl), Laurence McBriarty (tmb), Brian Sibbald (bs), Brian Bennett (bjo/vcl), Fred Thompson (dms/vcl).
A surprisingly low attendance, given that it was a bank holiday and the usual bank holiday banquet was on the table. On top of that, Mike Durham was on trumpet what more could a purist jazzer ask for?
Perhaps a little less rain is the answer. I'm sure the torrents that flowed from above cancelled out the appeal of the sumptuous array of sausage rolls, quiche, pork pies and sandwiches - enough to have fed a minor republic for a month - that complimented the music.
Tonight, Mike Durham on trumpet helped to make it a nicely balanced front-line with Barry Soulsby's clean lines contrasting with Laurence McB's earthy growls.
Usual trad fare with the exception of "When Somebody Thinks Your Wonderful" and "I Saw Stars". Fred crooned the former and Mike the latter.
I always associate "Stars" with, apart from Django, Becky Kilgore or Roly Veitch (in the audience tonight - Roly not Becky) so hearing it played on banjo was certainly an interesting alternative. Truth is, it's a great tune no matter what the line-up.
Brian B wore an unusual pair of shoes tonight - the soles at the toes are angled at about 45 degrees. This is quite a hazard for a banjo player - the weight of the resonator could easily cause him to topple over if he leaned forward. Perhaps he should have a lead attached to prevent this happening. Come to think of it, perhaps all banjo players should be on a lead.
Only joking (I think...)
Lance.

First Tuesday Live at the Robin Hood

Found this on Facebook. It may not be jazz - more of an artistic 'Go As you Please' - but there may be some jazzers involved looking at the guest list. -----
Description: Fantastic night of music and comedy and anything else that could be considered entertainment! On the first Tuesday of every month, performers from all areas of the entertainment industry gather to socialise and entertain ( if they wish) in the north east's best public house, the ROBIN HOOD in Jarrow, Tyne and Wear. From the novice newcomer to the seasoned professional, this 'night' offers a friendly and intimate atmosphere in the newly refurbished "Music Hall", formerly the home of the Jarrow Brewery Company. We aim to develop a format for a regional television show which will recreate the atmosphere and show off the talent from First Tuesday Live at the Robin Hood. Please arrive early as we expect capacity to be reached soon after the doors are opened! Robin Hood, Primrose Hill Jarrow NE32 5UB. Check out here.
-----
Lance.

Sunday, August 30, 2009

Contraband Discovered Near Blyth Beach

Vicky Wadsworth (vcl), Jonathon Haslett ? (pno), Andy Lawrenson (bs), Richard Miles (dms).
Before the gig I spoke to the bass player and I couldn't help thinking that he looked a lot like Andy Lawrenson - violin player I knew from my music shop days. Lo and behold I check out the names on the Contraband website and - It is Andy Lawrenson! I must have changed even more than he has. Anyhow my excuse is that I knew him as a violin player - I guess the doggone thing grew up on him!
Anyway, back to the music. Difficult to judge a band as sophisticated as Contraband are when they are playing to a scattered al fresco audience in a windswept park. Nevertheless, despite the conditions, they had a good polished sound with Vicky Wadsworth yet another outstanding vocalist to arrive on the scene.
On their site they look positively debonair - on the sea front at Blyth, debonair gave way to practicality. Overcoats and sweaters were the order of the day - even the pianist wore gloves which may account for some of the rich full chords he played behind Vicky's vocals.
"Summertime", Bill Wither's "Ain't No Sunshine", Norah Jones' "You Don't Have To", "Fly Me to The Moon" were just some of her vocals - put over with an attractive earthiness that in a different setting would have been showstopping.
A bit more volume and a bit less hurricane would have made the listening easier and saved the scores being scattered to the four winds and one of the seven seas.
I'd have stayed for the second set but, unlike the band and the wiser members of the audience I didn't have an overcoat.
Hope to catch you again guys.
As a matter of non-musical interest, the Great North Bike Ride Was taking place - over 2000 cyclists. I felt quite nostalgic for the good old days of cycling down to Richmond (N.Yorks) and back or climbing up to Nenthead near Alston as was once my wont. By coincidence, a couple of the band have connections with both of those places.
Click here for Photos. (The above photo was taken by John Taylor - I was totally unaware!)
Lance.

Saturday, August 29, 2009

The Streets Are Alive With the Sound of Music

Strolling down Northumberland Street in Newcastle I was delighted to hear swingy sounds filling the air. Even without a rhythm section, apart from the baritone sax who played some bassish lines, it swung along nicely. Radio 2 should have been recording it! (That's a compliment by the way guys - see previous post).
I didn't realise it at the time but the four hornmen are an offshoot of Soznak - a band that was one of the success stories of the recent Mouth of the Tyne Festival. I should have stayed longer!
I must also commend them on their business acumen - set up next to a cash machine. No excuse folks!
If you want to know more go to their excellent myspace site.
Further down the street some religious sect were singing and preaching the Gospel whilst in the Central Arcade, outside of J.G.Windows, two young violinists were displaying their undoubted virtuosity. From my days of working in the Arcade I know just how wonderful the acoustics are.
Finally, as I descended via escalator to the bowels of Monument Metro Station I heard the plaintive wail of an alto sax.
It was a sound I'd recognise anywhere - Diane from Dinnington.
Think "Harlem Nocturne" and you've got Diane. No one can make an alto sound quite as melancholy as Diane - apart from Johnny Hodges that is.
I'd never seen her for years and it was nice to chat and catch up.
All in all there was some good music out there today.
Lance.

Pre-rock music lacking on Radio 2

I spotted this letter on the Guardian website and, as it is a subject near to the heart of myself and, hopefully, others who visit this site, I thought I'd draw it to Lance's attention.
The writer, Gerry Stonestreet, is spot on with his views related to the lack of pre-rock music on Radio 2.
He also produces a very interesting sounding magazine, In Tune International, more details of which can be found on the highlighted link.
Liz.
(not the 'Elisabeth' referred to in the letter.)

Friday, August 28, 2009

Tonight's Shields Gazette

Those levee loungers who hang around The Porthole, the Crescent Club and other waterfront speakeasys will no doubt be familiar with Roy Gibson. Pianist Roy, is a familiar figure on the scene both as a soloist and as accompanist to Teresa Armstrong, one of the many Cullercoats canaries.
Gazette columnist, The Gaffa, himself a former 'treader of the boards', has centred today's Gazette article around Roy. Click here to read in full.
Lance.

Thursday, August 27, 2009

Maine Street Jazzmen @ Rosie Malone's South Shields.

Herbie Hudson (tmb/hca/vcl), Derek Fleck (clt), Malcolm Armstrong (pno), Alan Rudd (bs), Tommy Graham (dms), Olive Rudd (vcl) + Peter ? (tpt).
There couldn't have been a greater contrast to last night at the Chilli yet the Monk influence was still there. Perhaps it came in with me. During "Royal Garden Blues", Derek slipped in a quote from "Blue Monk" that did not sound out of place.
It was the usual stomping good afternoon with the usual happy crowd. A trumpet man - Peter - sat in for "That's A Plenty" "Ain't Misbehavin'", "Bill Bailey" and "Georgia on my Mind". He may have been auditioning. Such is the dearth of trad trumpet players these days that if you are competent enough to open the case you're in with a shout.
Again, Malcolm Armstrong did the barrelhouse proud with his two-fisted approach. The complete opposite to young Harley yet equally effective in it's own right.
Derek, facile as ever, delivered the goods ably supported by bass and drums.
Our favourite Thursday afternoon girl Olive was in good voice pushing out "Some of These Days" with more than a hint of Sophie Tucker. She also organised a backing trio with her cohorts during Herbie's vocal rendition of "Baby Doll" (You called me baby doll a year ago - 'baby doll, baby doll, baby doll'.)
Herbie wailed like an Ellingtonian slider on "Beale Street Blues", duetted on the 'do-wah-do-wahs' with Olive during "It Don't Mean a Thing", bent it like Bauer (Chris) on "Some of These Days" and went into a dance when Armstrong shouted "Feet!" (shades of the River City Jazzmen).
It was a fun afternoon with the crowd in good spirits to the extent that, after a rousing "Bill Bailey" someone shouted 'Play something lively'. They don't come much livelier than that!
In between tunes I chatted to a guy called Leo. Didn't catch his second name but I think it began with a K! He's a tenor sax man (Selmer Mark 6 no less) and a former member of the Gene Mayo band that played at Sunderland Rink Ballroom back in the 1960s. The late Bobby Carr was also in that band. Leo and I proved lucky for each other - I won a prize in the raffle as did his lady.
Lance.

Wednesday, August 26, 2009

A Star is Born - Harley Johnson and Take It To The Bridge @ the Chilli

Harley Johnson (pno), Jim Crinson (bs), Eric Stutt (dms), Paul Gowland (ten), Dave Weisser (tpt/vcl). + Barry Ashcroft (pno), Nicola Weaver (alt), Solly Bashiri (dms).
It was billed as the Harley Johnson Trio but in fact it was a quintet and a very good one too!
Hearing Harley, not quite 18, going through the Monk 'songbook' brought to mind the youthful emergence of the late Peter Jacobson back in the 1960s. Both appeared, seemingly out of nowhere, and both combined technique with a disregard for convention. I'm not saying that Harley has reached the Jacobson milestone yet but I feel he is getting closer and closer with each chorus.
Whether he's doing the right thing in being so Monk centred remains to be seen - what is certain is that nobody does it better - at least not in Heaton, Eton or Nuneaton on a Wednesday night.
Eric Stutt and Harley seem to have developed a rapport that makes for some scintillating counterpoint between piano and drums whilst Jim Crinson on bass was the perfect harmonic anchor.
After an exploratory solo version of "Monk's Mood" the band kicked in on "I Mean You", "Evidence", "Ask Me Now", "In Walked Bud", "Blue Monk" & "Well You Needn't".
Out front, Paul Gowland played breathtaking solos hurdling over the changes with ease - he really is an amazing player and not averse to extending the range of the tenor with some extraordinary harmonics.
By contrast, Dave's muted horn stayed within the bounds of convention, his gentle flow of expression blending nicely with the aura of 52nd Street that engulfed the bandstand -- he blew good. "Ask Me Now" wavered at times - it really is a bitch of a tune to play - but Dave's vocal came through okay.
Earlier, Dave had vocalised effectively on "I'll Never Be The Same".
The final jam saw Solly on drums and Nicola - two posts in a row - on alto joining Paul and Dave for "All The Things" and "Stella".
Quite a night - I can't wait for Harley's 19th birthday bash!
Lance.
Next week: Scotty Adair & Steve Whitfield + mystery vocalist(s).

Citizenship and Performing Artists.

There is a government consultation about the ability of foreign nationals to apply for citizenship of the UK happening, on-line, at the address below. Interested parties are invited to read it and respond to it for the following reason. The key problem is that in the Arts, and particularly music, highly skilled individuals - such as Claude Werner and David Carnegie, musicians working in the North East - would potentially score low points because of their relatively low earnings. Musicians, and presumably other people in the arts, are often highly qualified but low paid and it would be very unfair if they were excluded from applying for citizenship because of this fact.
I think we need to make sure they write this new legislation in such a way that having low earnings does not exclude such people who are an asset to our community from being able to accumulate enough points to become a citizen of the UK.
The proposed point based system in Chapter 2 part 2 is still in a formative phase and we should have the ability to influence how it is written. There is an on line consultation form that any one can fill in, with boxes for comments. Please take a look and fill one in (- right hand side of the screen 'Respond to the consultation on line') http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/managingborders/managingmigration/earned-citizenship/points-test-citizenship/ Nicola Weaver
(Please note, no comments can be made other than via the above link - Lance)

Tonight at the Chilli - MONK LIVES!

The HARLEY JOHNSON TRIO pay tribute to Thelonious Monk with a special one hour set at the Chillingham tonight. With Eric Stutt (dms) and Jim Crinson (bs) it looks like being a 'gasser' if you'll excuse my archaic expression.
Harley, one week short of his eighteenth birthday, tells me the trio will be augmented by Paul Gowland on tenor and resident maitre d', Dave Weisser, on trumpet and vocals.
Like wow!
The gig kicks off around 8:00 pm with Monastic activities commencing around nine (should be midnight!).
With gigs like tonight's 2 (3) I imagine 100s of jazzers from York heading up to Newcastle whilst the Newcastle jazzers head down to York. Perhaps they'll collide halfway and end up at Jeremy McMurray's gig at The Causeway near Hartlepool!
Lance.

YORK JAZZ SCENE ISSUE 3 LAUNCH!

Anna Lacey sent me the following information and invite:
Event: YORK JAZZ SCENE ISSUE 3 LAUNCH! "The only magazine for the jazz community in York!"
What: Exhibit
Host: York Jazz Scene
Start Time: Today, Wednesday 26 August at 20:45
End Time: Today, Wednesday 26 August at 23:15
Where: The Black Swan Inn.
Anna tells me that, because of this enlarged edition, a smaller print run means that copies will be like gold dust! so the Black Swan seems to be the place to be tonight (Wednesday).
As an added incentive tenor player Iain Dixon is the guest star.
Sounds like a good night is in store - and it's a great local mag. Got the blues to be there.
Lance.

Tuesday, August 25, 2009

Monday, August 24, 2009

One Not To Miss - says John Taylor.

Stacey Kent and Jim Tomlinson @ Alnwick Playhouse, October 4. Click for details. Not the most comfortable seats - no leg room (Took Sheila last time.) Jim was head choirboy at Hexham Abbey and was in the Northumberland Schools Wind Band. John T.

Sunday, August 23, 2009

The Story of the Hagstrom James L D'Aquisto Guitar by Ron Chapman.

My earlier meeting today with Ron Chapman produced this post that first appeared in "Just Jazz Guitar". Ron writes about his Hagstrom "Jimmy" guitars. It's a must for all guitar buffs. Click here. (Ignore the date on the link today's date is the correct one!) Lance. (There will be more from Ron later inc. a piece on Gary Potter.)

Ron Chapman - Sand Dancer, South Shields.

Ron Chapman (solo guitar).
The waves rolled in from the sea, beating against fortified wall with the ferocity of a Buddy Rich drum solo. Not a day for swimming.
Entering the bar I hear a child crying, Sunday lunchtime chit-chat fills the air. There is much to talk about - both local soccer teams have won. Knives and forks and plates provide the rhythm to the youngster's plaintive wail. Above it all, the strains of "Moonlight in Vermont" drift gently across the room. This is what I came for. I order a drink - a lager shandy, I too am in party mode. Skilfully ignoring a couple of rug-rats I find a seat close to the music.
In a corner, perched on a high stool, Ron Chapman plays, seemingly oblivious to the surroundings.
"Vermont" segues into "Over The Rainbow" and I show my appreciation with some 'air' clapping. He nods in acknowledgment and plays "Send in the Clowns" (not I hope directed at me!). "What Are You Doing The Rest of Your Life", "Embraceable You" (or was it "Darn That Dream"? Whatever it's all nice tasteful stuff.
With Ron you don't get Montgomerylike runs or flashy flights of fancy. Ron's forté is the unexpected chord that turns the piece around into something new. He explained later that, because of arthritus he sometimes fingers a wrong chord.
The chords sounded good to me. "You Don't Know What Love Is", "As Time Goes By" and finally "Nuages". Later I chat with Ron. We find we have a lot of mutual acq.'s and he promises to post some guitar stuff for the blog. As I type I notice already my inbox filling up - watch this space. Lance. (Ron Chapman plays four lunchtimes every week, Mondays and Fridays in the Priory Pub in Tynemouth and Saturday and Sundays at the Sand Dancer in South Shields. He describes his playing as: "Solo chordal jazz in the syle of Joe Pass, Johnny Smith, Barney Kessel etc. (I hope!)")

Saturday, August 22, 2009

Dewy-eyed update.

Talking with Valerie and Jim at today's Fenner sisters gig conversation got around to the currently popular Dewy-eyed postings.
Jim, who was my best man, reminded me that as we awaited the arrival of the taxi to 'get me to the church on time' we filled the time in by jamming on Sir Charles Thompson's "Robbins' Nest". So, with such a pedigree I feel I should get dewy-eyed over "Robbins' Nest" at the expense of "Thanks For The Memory". Thanks for the Memory, Jim!
Not to be outdone, Jim's wife, Valerie, who also happened to be Marlene's bridesmaid, reminded me that, before we were married, she and Marlene were on holiday and M brought me back a 45 of Sinatra singing "I've Got A Crush On You". So I guess it is goodbye to "The Way You Look Tonight".
At least TWYLT is still in the game thanks to Ms. Anonymous who e'er she be.
Lance.

Fenner Sisters Blitz Durham

(l-r) Grace, Kay and Jill Fenner.
The Market Square is awash with GIs & Marines, Gobs & Tommy's, Waafs & Wrens. Jeeps and armoured vehicles are parked. A guy with three stripes on his arm is brandishing a Bren Gun. There's even a couple of SS men goosestepping to the music. The only person missing is Hitler.
On the Town Hall steps - The Fenner Sisters, resplendent in number one Waac uniform, are "In The Mood".
Grace, Kay and Jill have got the Andrews Sisters down to a fine art. I'm sure that Patti, the only surviving sister (aged 91) would approve.
The harmonies are right on and the moves straight out of "Stage Door Canteen."
"Straighten Up and Fly Right", "Bei Mir Bist Du Schon", "Chattanooga Choo Choo", complete with verse, "Apple Blossom Time" and, of course, "The Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy of Company B" are spot on with the originals.
And it isn't only Patti, Maxene and Laverne who inspire the girls; they also put in a good word for arguably the greatest of all the girl groups - the Boswell Sisters - with "I'm Gonna Sit Right Down and Write Myself a Letter".
Nostalgia? Of course it is and tell me what's wrong with that?
The superb backing tracks, by the Dave Connolly Big Band, could have came straight from Dorsey or Miller whilst there's more than a hint of Benny in the clarinet solos and Harry in the trumpet licks.
The 30 minute set whizzs by like a Spitfire or a Hurricane off to notch up a few Messerschmidt's. So authentic is it all I'm half-expecting the air raid sirens to go off.
The Ministry of Misinformation (local website) announced that the jitterbugging jamborees stomped off at 13:15 & 14:45 respectively when in actual fact the times were 12:30 & 14:30 - an earlier show had already taken place at 11:30.
Fortunately, my driver, after seeing my pass (bus) had got me there in time for the 12:30 landing.
A great day and not even a Doodlebug to mar the proceedings.
Can't wait to catch then again - these gals must be the best thing to come out of Sedgefield. Check them out on Myspace.
Lance. (The last of the few).

Noise Abatement

I just wonder if folk out there have similar views to mine or whether I'm now in the 'grumpy old man' category. My gripe is with the sheer extent of music saturation - most of it irritating pap. It seems you can't go into a shop or a store without music blasting out - our local B&Q has music so loud you can't hear yourself think. I complain to the checkout folk but they look at you as if you're crazy.
A lot of TV (especially sport) has loud (louder than the conversation) rock music phased in behind any interviews or stats. Everywhere you go radios seem to be blasting out -- in folk's cars (doof, doof), over gardens, etc. Jobbing builders play radios you can hear streets away. On our local minibus service the drivers have radios going. Recently I experienced that plus a youngster playing an MP3 in the rear of the bus. Unwanted bitonal noise in stereo!!
Most of it is pop/rock with irritating DJs who love the sound of their own drivelling voices. I hate it and moan on about it a lot (which annoys my wife!). I just don't want any noise inflicted upon me that is not of my choosing.
It seems that the perpetrators (shops, TV) conclude this is actually what their customers want and maybe it is. It seems that folk these days just have to have 'noise' around them. But what damage is all this music saturation doing to live music promotion? I mean if you were a store employee who has just done an 8 hour shift with endless background music droning on, would you want to go to a music concert that evening? I don't know the answer and wonder what other music/jazz lovers think about it.
Roly

Congrats. Harley.

Congratulations to the Monkishly inclined Harley Johnson on his A level results. (Was it straight (no chaser) A's?)
The teenage 'Thelonious' will play a 'Tribute to the High Priest of Bebop' trio set at the Chilli (Chillingham Pub on Chillingham Road, Heaton, Newcastle) this coming Wednesday - August 26. Don't miss this opportunity to get in on the ground floor (technically speaking it's upstairs in the pub but you know what I mean) of one of the burgeoning talents of British jazz.
In years to come you'll be able to regale your grandchildren with "I was there" stories. Yes - I Mean You!
Lance.

Friday, August 21, 2009

Horn Dogs @ Bridge Hotel. 20th August.

Graham Hardy (trumpet), Alastair Lord (trumpet), John Wheeler (tenor), Eddie Bellis (trombone), Don Fairley (trombone), Alex Tustin (snare drum), Brendan Murphy (bass drum & percussion), Paul Susans (sousaphone). I was on the horns of a dilemma - to go over to Blaydon to catch Roly's gig or go into town to hear Graham Hardy's new outfit?
Hardy's Horn Dogs and the promise of a topnotch pint won the day. The Isle of Skye Brewery's ''Skyelight'' proved to be a good choice - would the music?
The eight piece band filled the small stage of the upstairs room; the room itself was standing room only as the opener, an uptempo ''Tears of a Clown'' drew rapturous applause from an excited, expectant crowd. Rainbow's ''Since You've Been Gone'' (not exactly familiar jazz material) worked well as did a quickfire slew of film, television and cartoon theme tunes; the theme from the ''A Team'', ''Banana Splits'', ''Flash!'' and a sci-fi medley! The first set rattled along with a couple of bona fide jazz numbers thrown in to appease the Jazz Police (such appeasement wasn't necessary - the JP weren't in attendance) - the Youngblood Brass Band's ''Brooklyn'' (a feature for Eddie Bellis) and the timeless hymn ''What a Friend We Have in Jesus''. These latter tunes demonstrated the band's jazz credentials; the disciplined ensemble work of the brass band and the flawless technique of each and every one of the jazz musicians on the stand. The joint jumpin', the band cookin', the interval offered the welcome opportunity of a refreshing pint. The Bridge Hotel has some of the best beers to be found anywhere and tonight's selection was particularly good. A new barrel had just been introduced in time for the interval - the Big Lamp Brewery's ''A Brew for Bobby''. Tiptop, as they say. The second set proved to be every bit as good as the first. Bright and breezy, a consistently high standard of performance and real enthusiasm shown by all, not least the rhythm section (Tustin, Murphy & Susans). Graham Hardy contributed two original compositions - ''Big and Brassy'' and ''The Melon Felony''. Hardy can write. He should produce and perform more of his own material. At the end of the night the band won an encore. Quite right too. Horn Dogs sent us on our way with ''Hey Jude''. All together now...next time we'll get along to a Horn Dogs gig. Russell.

Thursday, August 20, 2009

Paul Edis/Roly Veitch Quartet @ Blaydon Jazz Club

Paul Edis (pno), Roly Veitch (gtr), Neil Harland (bs), Billy Shield (dms).
Another one of those charming miniatures that Roly Veitch so expertly puts together.
Last month it was the trio with Noel Dennis & Neil Harland, This time around a quartet co-led with Paul Edis with Neil on bass and Billy Shield drums.
The room had a respectable sized crowd who listened intently to the opening "I Hear A Rhapsody". Intently was the operative word as, volumewise, Roly's amp was set on one of those low digit numbers that few guitarists know exist.
However, the dial was given a clockwise turn or two for "Dream Dancing" and at last we could hear the tasteful runs and phrases along with the well chosen chords to compliment Paul's piano.
"Jordu", "Cottontail", "Django", "Sultry Serenade" - a real gem - "Donna Lee" and "A Child is Born" were some of a well chosen selection of jazz standards along with some not unduly overdone tunes from the gasbook such as "Darn That Dream" and Jan Savitt's "It's A Wonderful World."
There were also a couple of originals from Paul - a boppy "Charlie's Line" that in places reminded me of a sailors hornpipe as played by Charlie Parker - and a more sensitive opus entitled simply "Dedicated to the Duke".
Paul was also featured on solo piano playing a cleverly interwoven medley of "Surrey with The Fringe on Top", "Blue on Green" and "'Round Midnight."
Neil Harland, as ever excelled on bass his melodic lines and steady accompaniment absolutely gelled.
On drums, Billy Shield kept it simple yet effective.
It was a good gig even though Roly didn't do any crooning - his lyrical phrasing on guitar made up for it. Photos.
Lance.
PS: Catch Roly on 29th August @ Boston Spa with Keith Stephen's Gypsy Jazz Trio.

Maine Street Jazzmen @ Rosie Malone's South Shields.

Herbie Hudson (tmb/hca/vcl), Derek Fleck (clt), Malcolm Armstrong (pno), Alan Rudd (bs), Tommy Graham (dms), Olive Rudd (vcl).
Another fun packed afternoon at "Rosies" with everyone on form - even Derek dropped the mask of inscrutability. This may have been because of his innovative idea of using an alto reed on clarinet. Whether by intent or accident I don't know but it played okay. The question now is, was Derek playing a clariphone or an altonet?
The repertoire was as per with few surprizes although this was one occasion when familiarity certainly didn't breed contempt. I say few surprizes but "Summertime", played as an uppish tempoed jazz waltz, was new to me and it worked.
Herbie did his thing on harmonica as well as a few vocals and a plunger solo on, I think, the aforementioned "Summertime" that could have been mistaken for Lawrence McBriarty - or did I mean 'Tricky Sam' Nanton?
As always, Olive strutted her stuff with verve and vitality - "Sister Kate" had an almost vaudevillian appeal whilst her opener, "All of Me," seemed like an extension of last night's finale at the Chilli. There was also a duet with Herbie on "Deed I Do" which replaced "I Wished on the Moon" - next week Olive?
On drums, Tommy Graham - the facial resemblance to his father Johnny is markedly noticeable - drove things along nicely ably supported by Alan on bass and Malcolm on piano.
As usual, the gig was well-attended but where, I ask, are the South Shields jazz fraternity? Until a few years back South Shields had a thriving jazz club - there must be a few of the former members still around.
Lance.

Blaydon Buzz - TONIGHT: PAUL EDIS/ROLY VEITCH QUARTET

Pianist/composer Paul Edis has in the past 2/3 years emerged as one of the area's finest jazz musicians, with a style reminiscent of the great Bill Evans. For this concert he joins Billy Shield dms, Neil Harland bass and Roly Veitch gtr/vcls for a one-off get together. £4. (*In the lounge).
Well worth making the trip for what, I suspect, will be an evening of quality.
Get there soon as it is a very small room that is ideally suited to the intimacy of the occasion.
Lance.

Ashington Latest

The nationally acclaimed trumpet player Bob Ludlam is this month’s guest with the Maine Street Jazzmen at Ashington Jazz Club.
This Bolton-on-Dearne (Rotherham) based trumpet maestro's musical grounding began at the age of nine. He has played in the North Derbyshire Youth Orchestra and with various brass bands. While still a schoolboy he formed his first jazz band 'The Florence Stompers'. Bob is influenced by the work of James Shepherd’s Versatile Brass through to Louis Armstrong, Clark Terry, Kenny Ball, Bobby Hackett and Arturo Sandoval.
Bob is returning to the club by popular request following his memorable first appearance last January. Nowadays, he performs all over the North of England with his own bands or as a guest artiste with the likes of the Maine Street Jazzmen.
This popular Tyneside based traditional jazz band has played on regular occasions at Ashington Jazz Club for over fifteen years. The band is made up of experienced local musicians led by Herbie Hudson on trombone, harmonica & vocals, with Derek Fleck on clarinet & sax. Malcolm Armstrong (for many years music lecturer at Ashington Tech.) is on the keyboard along with Ian Hetherington on the drums and Alan Rudd on double bass. Alan’s wife Olive will join the line up for several vocals. They have weekly gigs in the afternoons at The Porthole in North Shields, Rosie Malone’s in South Shields and the Lambton Arms in Gateshead.
The concert is on September 2nd at the Elephant pub in Ashington starting at 8:30 pm. and is part funded by a previous grant from Wansbeck Council.
John Taylor.

The Jobbing Band

Click here for a humourous look at the creation of the first band. Original post linked for space reasons.

Wednesday, August 19, 2009

Diminuendo and Crescendo - Take it to the Bridge @ The Chilli.

Dave Weisser (tpt/vcl), Paul Gowland, Dr. Steve Summers (tenors), Laurie Brown (vibes/drums), Barry Ascroft (pno), Jim Crinson (bs), Solly Bashiri (dms). + Harley Johnson & Chris Finch (pno).
Tonight began very low key - no drums, Eric had a last minute emergency and couldn't make it. So it kicked off softly softly as a quartet - Dave, Jim, Barry and Laurie. The vibes gave it a Shearing cum MJQ sound with Dave throwing muted Miles into the mix. "September Song," "Moonglow", "It Don't Mean a Thing", "Lullaby of Birdland" just some of the exquisitely executed miniatures.
Come the second set and it was all systems go. Solly Bashiri arrived and was promptly sent home and told to come back with drums which, with some audience assistance, he did.
Chris Finch moved in on keyboards and two kickass tenor players - Paul Gowland and Dr. Steve Summers - arrived looking for blood. I said thank you to my lucky stars for not having my own sax with me!
This was the real deal; both players went for the jugular in the time honoured tradition of tenor players past present and, no doubt, future. Paul Gonsalves playing the interlude from "Dim. & Cres. in Blue" (Ellington @ Newport 1956) was but the starting point for these two guys!
A high-scoring score draw the only possible result!
Laurie played drums whilst Solly went to retrieve a missing bass pedal. Chris had some punchy solos before Harley finished the night off with the whole gang screaming and kicking "All of Me" into Jack Common's old backyard (No. 44 Third Avenue.)
This was one of those nights that are becoming more and more frequent at the Chilli.
With the Harley Johnson Trio next week, Scotty Adair and Steve Whitfield, the week after, then Budvivar, Alan Glen and Mo Scott to follow, the Chilli has got to be the hottest ticket in town (trans: Toon.)
Lance.

Solid Serenade

Hil reminded me of this Tom and Jerry cartoon a while back. The soundtrack is by the Woody Herman Band with Woody on vocal. Click here. Lance.

Downing Street Petition.

I'm posting this for the attention of everyone who might have an interest in amending the current ridiculous law that says you need an expensive and complicated Entertainment Licence to put on a jazz band on licensed premises, but can run a zillion-watt disco without any need for one. If you haven't already signed up, please take a minute or two to scan the following and sign up if you agree we have enough regulation without this nonsense. Click Here to read and sign.
Yours for live music with as few complications as possible (PAT testing, Public Liability Insurance, Health & Safety regulations.....aarghh!)
Mike Durham. (This site normally steers clear of anything political - jazz and quality song is our forté. However, in this case I think an exception must be made and all site visitors are asked to read and, if they agree with Mike and the several thousand others who have already signed, to add their support. Lance.)

Tuesday, August 18, 2009

NOT TO BE MISSED - TONIGHT's PROM ON RADIO 3

Brian Chester has brought this to my attention: The Ukulele Orchestra of Great Britain perform Wagner's Ride of the Valkeries and Parry's Jerusalem!!! Pluck Off is at 22:00 hrs on Radio 3. Lance.

Jackie Tracey RIP.

Looked in on Double Dave's blog - That's A Big Guitar - and was saddened to read of the death of Jackie Tracey - wife of Stan and mother of Clark and Sarah. Thanks, if that is the right word, Dave for the sad news; condolences to Stan and family. R.I.P. Lance.

Monday, August 17, 2009

My Monday Date - Vieux Carré Jazzmen @ Corner House

Peter Wright (tpt/vcl), Barry Soulsby (clt/alt/vcl), Lawrence McBriarty (tmb), Brian Bennett (bjo/vcl), Brian Sibbald (bs), Fred Thompson (dms/vcl). Guest clarinet, Ian Cuthbertson.
From Canada via Florida, where he plays for the Gold Coast Community Band, came Ian Cuthbertson. Ian sat in for a couple of numbers on clarinet - "Just A Closer Walk" and "When You're Smiling".
Other delights included the "Yellow Dog Blues", "High Society" - featuring Barry on clarinet, and a quite amazing vocal from Fred on "Blues My Naughty Sweetie Gives to Me." To get all the words in during the stop chorus withough missing a beat was quite an achievement. "Winin' boy Blues" was another one of Fred's chunks de resistance.
Lawrence MacB blew some salty tram on this one his mute work never without interest.
Leading it all, Peter varied from roof-raising blasts to moments of intimate delicacy with the former quality in the ascendancy.
Intimate delicacy doesn't play a big part in a banjoman's armoury and Brian B clunked and clicked on every trip to provide the solid foundation to the frontline - ably abetted, of course, by Brian S.
All in all a worthwhile 'Monday Date'.
Lance.

Sunday, August 16, 2009

York Update

The Alan Barnes' gig at the Black Swan in York that was advertised as being on Sept. 26 is actually on SEPT. 16. Thank you for that update Anna (Creator of York Jazz Scene). Lance.

Johnny Heenan Band in Amsterdam

Ray Harley has kindly sent me some photos of the Johnny Heenan Band in Amsterdam taken at a wedding at the Amsterdam Hylton back in the 1980s. Line-up: Ray Harley, Gordon Marshall (tpt), Don Fairley (tmb), Norman Barkus, Arthur Mowatt, Syd Warren, Stan Coates (saxes), George ? (pno), Brian? (bs), Ollie Rillands (dms), Kay Rouselle, Johnny Heenan (vcl).
Those guys on the loose in Amsterdam?! Click here to view. Lance.

Tyne Valley Stomping in Saltwell Park.

Fred Rowe (tpt), Lance Cousins (tmb), Barry Soulsby (clt), Terry Harvey (bjo/gtr), Tom Derbyshire (bs),Mike Harrison (dms).
There are few more attractive sounds than, when walking through a park, the strains of "Apex Blues" wafts through the leafy glades and guides you to its source.
The source in this instance was the bandstand in Gateshead's Saltwell Park and the purveyers of such purity were the Tyne Valley Stompers.
The Stompers were in good form and in good voice - the majority of them seemed to be able to exercise their vocal chords at will.
Tom Derbyshire couldn't give me anything but love whilst the drummer proclaimed that it was a sin to tell a lie. I'm quite sure that Barry and Fred also made some statements in song.
"I Found a New Baby" was given a good workout with an exceptionally good solo from namesake; slideman Lance (Cousins). With the end of the first set came the rain and, although it wasn't too severe, I decided to call it a day just in case...
The Stompers should do more gigs - they get a good dixieland sound - even in the open air.
Lance.

More Les Paul plus the Rosemary Squires Connection...

Click Here for live session and interview on Marian McPartland's Piano Jazz courtesy of npr radio. 57 minutes of music and chat with Les and Marian. ------- Chatting via Email with Frank Lockyer - Rosemary Squires' husband and manager - he said "...you may like to know that Rosemary has a one off recording of herself with Les Paul." Frank continued, "I think you know that Les Paul tried to persuade Rosemary to join him to replace Mary Ford who was by then quite unwell. Rosemary, who was in New York at the time working, amongst others, the Johnny Carson Show, and her then manager, visited Les at his home and saw first hand his famous studio and multi-tracking engineering. Whilst there she recorded with him 'You always hurt the one you love' which she has kept to this day. Radio Cumbria (Anne Hopper) has called for it but I do not know when it is to be broadcast. Otherwise it is certainly exclusive and only once aired on an interview Rosemary did on BBC Wiltshire several years ago. Though flattered to be asked, Rosemary was homesick and decided against his offer and returned home." Frank also mentioned that she also has rare tapes with Eddie Thompson of a broadcast they did together for the BBC...
Perhaps we'll get a 'Dewy-eyed' song title from Rosemary?
Lance.

Latest on Old Blue Eyes

Whilst we await an update on the projected Hollywood Sinatra biopic comes a report, hot off the New Jersey press, of a Sinatra stage presentation in the offing that looks a little bit different inasmuch as it isn't a "Rat Pack Rides Again" mishmash. Click here for details. Lance.

Saturday, August 15, 2009

Meanwhile, down on the Jersey Shore... Blue Mood

Lydia, a friend from the Asbury Park area of New Jersey - a.k.a Springsteen Country - sent me this photo from a concert she attended in a park near where she lives.
"This is Blue Mood ..... the group from the blues concert last week........The girl singer did a very good Janis Joplin. It was a young group and I felt sorry for them because the weather had been stormy in the late afternoon and only myself and a friend turned up for the show along with a few of the groups family. Lydia."
(I'm hoping for better luck at Saltwell Park, Gateshead tomorrow. Lance.)

Dewy Eyed

Yes I know how difficult it is to pick out that one special number that just moves you to a dewy eyed state, but for me it has to be "My One and Only Love". Liz. (Quite a challenge Liz to pick one song. I think we should pick one and have four reserves. So I'll go for "I Wished on the Moon" with "Robbins Nest", "You're a Lucky Guy", "I've Got A Crush on You" and "Can't We Be Friends?" on the bench. What do others think? - Lance)

The Jobbing Band.

...And so, in the dark of night, the Lord awoke Noah and spoke to him.
"Noah, awake and heed my words!"
And Noah, being sore, afraid and disoriented, did cry out, "Who goeth there?"
And the Lord did smite him upside the head, saying, "It is the lord of all things, dummy.
And Noah did tremble, saying, "Lord, why hath thou wakened me?
And the Lord did say, "Noah, build me a Jobbing Band. "For the earth will be visited by a plague of Brides, followed by forty days of Trade Shows and forty nights of Awards Banquets."
And Noah did say, "Command me, Lord."
And the Lord did say, "First, thou must find me a Leader."
And Noah replied, "But Lord, will I not be thy Leader?"
And the Lord did smite him again, saying, "Fool, thou will be my Contractor. Ask not why!"
And Noah did bow his head, saying, "Yes, my Lord. And what will this Leader play?"
And the Lord said, "It mattereth little, whether he play or not, or whether he be proficient or not. For his job shall primarily be to talk to the Brides and their Mothers, and to deal with Clients, and to count off Tempos wrong, and to inquire as to whether overtime will happen, and to try to segue tunes that should not be segued. If he playeth any instrument, thou must always have another player of that instrument on the band, just to be safe."
And Noah did say, "And what else shall this Leader do?"
And the Lord replied, "It shall be his job to spread Bad Information and Confusion amongst the Sidemen, and to pit them one against the other, and to delay all payments. "Further shall it be his job, until we can afford a Soundman, to create Feedback, and to invent new Equalization Curves therefore."
And Noah did shake his head in wonder, saying, "Lord, thy ways are Strange and Mysterious. What more shall I do?"
And the Lord said, "Next, find me a Rhythm Section. First, find me a Drummer.
And Three Things above all must this Drummer possess."
And Noah did ask, "What are these Three Things? Double Bass Drums? An Electronic Kit? Congas?"
And the Lord did smite Noah again, saying "Second-guess me not, my servant. First, this Drummer must have slightly imperfect time, so that whenever He playeth a Fill (and he shall play many), he always emergeth at a different place, sometimes early and sometimes late, but thou may not guess which.
And second, he must be Supremely Discontent, always hoping for the Big Break which will lead to him playing with Chick Corea or Madonna, so that he despiseth Jobbing.
"And third, he must always be convinced of his Righteousness, in all things, including Time, Volume, Tempo and Feel, so that he argueth always with the Bass Player."
And Noah did say, "As you command, Lord. And what next?" And the Lord did say, "Thou art learning, Noah. Next shall be the Bass Player.
And he shall be Bored. That is all."
And Noah did say, "Of course. And next, my Lord?" "Next shall be the Piano Player.
And he shall play as if he has twenty fingers.
And he shall ply Substitute upon Substitute, until no man may name the Chord, and he will not be helpful. Furthermore, he shall always be late.
And he shall always be trying out New Gear, Of which he has no knowledge."
And Noah did wonder aloud, "Lord, Great is thy Wisdom!" "Next shall be the Guitar Player. And he shall be a Rock Guitar Player.
And he shall be Loud, and he shall sing 'Old Time Rock n'Roll'. Also shall he know not The Page, and so shall rely upon his Ears, Which have been damaged by exposure to High Sound Pressure Levels. For the Guitarists who Read shall already be playing Shows, and will be making the Big Shekels.
And his tux shall be the Rattiest."
And Noah did say, "It shall be done."
And the Lord did say, "Next thou shall need Horns. First shall be the Saxophones.
And they shall be Beboppers
And they shall play their Bird Quotes in every song, Yea, even the Celine Dion ballad.
And they shall Get High on every break,
And make the Long Faces all night long, but Especially when 'In The Mood' is called.
Next shall be the Trumpeters.
And they shall every one attempt to take everything Up an Octave, And fail frequently.
And of Changes they shall know nothing.
And finally shall be the Trombone Player.
And many jokes will be made about him, for he will have a Beeper, as well as a Day Job, and he will be the first to be Cut from the Band."
And Noah, taking many notes, did say, "Mighty is the Lord!"
"Next shall be the String Players. Find me Three Women, and attach Pickups to their Violins that are more ancient even than Myself, so that their instruments screecheth and causeth great pain.
And their job shall be to dress in Evening Gowns, And to Fake Parts on all Ballads, And to occasionally Stroll, and to complain about the Volume, and the Intonation, and to impede the Swing."
And Noah did say, "What else can be left, Lord?And the Lord did say, "Finally, find me the Singers.
And they shall be Three, one a Male, and two Females.
And the Male shall be a Strutting Peacock, with the Rock 'N Roll Hair, and he shall never have to wear The Tuxedo, And also shall he play The Harmonica.
And of the Females, one shall be Black and one shall be White.
And the Black one shall ALWAYS sing the Aretha songs, and the Disco.
And the White one shall ALWAYS sing the Power Ballads, and the Country Songs. But both shall share the Motown Medley, and shall sing Backup for the Male, And forget the Words, and be Late, and know nothing of Keys or Form.
And they shall leave every gig immediately, having never touched a piece of Equipment.
And they shall be paid many more shekels than the Sidemen. Ask not why."
And Noah did say, "As Thou sayest, my Lord."
And the Lord did command him, "Search high and low for these, as not every musician can fulfill these requirements.
And though we have No Work yet, a Committment must be secured from All.
And while you're at it, start looking for Subs."
And Noah did say, "Lord, thy will be done."
And it was.
Just had this from Geo Gilmour from Eyemouth ( Clarinet with the Criterion Marching Band) - John Taylor.

Free Parking

This Sunday, weather permitting, looks the ideal time to take a jazzy stroll in the park.
In Redcar, the Middlesbrough Jazz and Blues Orchestra play al fresco from 2 pm - 4 pm at Newcomen Terrace.
Further north, at Roker Park, Sunderland, Broadway Melody will be playing Broadway melodies and other tunes from 2 pm - 4 pm.
Gateshead's Saltwell Park hosts the Tyne Valley Stompers who start at the same time as the others but continue stomping until 5: 00 pm. They repeat the doze two weeks later on August 30.All gigs are free.
Lance.

Keith Armstrong Book Launch

Not a jazz item but Dr. Keith Armstrong, poet extraordinaire, is a jazz fan and is supportive of this site - remember his Chet Baker poem? - he also has another jazz work in the pipeline which will be premiered here so I felt we should draw attention to his forthcoming book launches.
Lance.

Friday, August 14, 2009

Stomping @ The Saville Exchange with the Saville Swing Septet and Teresa Armstrong.

Mike Durham (tpt), Derek Fleck (reeds), Paul Munnery (tmb), Brian Chester (pno), Iain McAulay (bs), Jim Birkett (gtr), Pete Soulsby (dms), Teresa Armstrong (vcl).
Possibly because most of the performers can be heard elsewhere in the borough for free the attendance fell below expectations.
However, for those who wanted an alternative to two episodes of Coronation Street it was money well spent.
The music reminded me of those swingy Harlem combos of the 1930s - Red Allen or Albert Nicholas are the two that spring to my mind - and, although there were occasional moments of indecision they didn't detract from the rhythmic delights and bouncy solos. The repertoire was magic. "You're Lucky To Me" (Mike made reference to Louis but I'll always associate it with Muggsy), "Drop Me Off In Harlem", "Swing That Music", "Delta Bound", "Harlem Madness", "Blue Lou" to mention but some. The lady sitting next to me - a Blaydon regular - said, "They've played some great numbers tonight" and I had to agree with her.
Jim Birkett was absolutely tremendous - is he ever not?
Paul Munnery fired off some blastphemingly good trombone - his more delicate side showing on "A Hundred Years From Today". Mike took the vocal on this one and played a solid lead throughout the gig as well as soloing with taste and elegance. Derek blew alto, tenor and clarinet; his style tailored to the period.
On piano, Brian knocked out some rollicking stuff to his own, and the audience's, obvious enjoyment whilst on bass and drums, Iain and Pete laid down a firm foundation with a few telling solos thrown in.
Vocals were handled by Teresa Armstrong and, despite a few nervous moments, acquitted herself well on "S'Wonderful", "Out of Nowhere", "Mean To Me" and "I've Got a Crush on You". No easy song to sing is Crush. The girl did good.
Among the celebs in the audience was Ruth Lambert. Her eagerly awaited CD is due to be launched at the Saville Exchange on October 23. Put it in your diary.
Photos. Lance.

TAKE IT TO THE BRIDGE - LATEST

The Wednesday night sessions at the Chillingham on Chillingham Road, Heaton are moving up a gear - take a look at the listings in the sidebar.
Latest addition is the HARLEY JOHNSON TRIO in a "Tribute to Thelonious Monk" session.
Harley, pictured, still only 17, is perhaps the youngest exponent of Monk's music in the area if not the world and has the great man's music off to perfection.
Don't miss it - August 26. Doors open 8:00 pm.
Lance.

RASHIED ALI - RIP

He was due to appear at the 2009 Newport Jazz Festival but didn't make it. Rashied Ali, one of the first Free Jazz drummers, died August 12 in New York aged 76. Best known to me for his work with John Coltrane. RIP. More details. Lance.

Thursday, August 13, 2009

LES PAUL - RIP

Les Paul died today aged 94. Where to start with such a multi-talented individual?
I first came across him when he and his wife Mary Ford were riding the charts with "Mocking Bird Hill", "Vaya Con Dios", "The World Is Waiting For The Sunshine", "How High The Moon", "Walkin' Whistlin' Blues" and dozens of others all using the then pioneering multi-tracking technique.
As I got into jazz I encountered the incredible guitar/piano choruses recorded with Nat Cole at a Jazz At The Philharmonic concert in the 1940s.
Until recently he played a regular Monday night gig in New York
When I started work in a local music shop I soon discovered that the Gibson Les Paul was THE guitar. I doubt if there's a serious guitarist anywhere, whether jazz or rock, who hasn't at one time owned a Les Paul or at least a Les Paul copy.
An amazing man, worshipped by musicians and technicians alike.
There are already a whole wadge of tributes appearing so I'll leave you to Google your own until the definitive one appears.
In the meantime, Wikipedia does the business.
Rest in Peace Les you were a one off (except on those multi-tracked recordings...)
Lance.

Maine Street Jazzmen @ Rosie Malone's South Shields.

Herbie Hudson (tmb/vcl/hca), Derek Fleck (clt), Malcolm Armstrong (pno), Alan Rudd (bs), Ian Hetherington (dms), Olive Rudd (vcl/raffle).
The Vieux Carré Jazzmen may be taking part in a World War II re-inactment over the bank holiday but the Maine Street gang got in first with a rousing rendition of "The White Cliffs of Dover". For a moment I was transported back in time 68 years to 1941 when a German bomb dropped on the very spot where I was sitting! Fortunately this time the only explosions were in the rhythm section.
Olive was, as always, in good voice as she chanted "Jeepers Creepers", "When You're Smiling" and other faves. For this style of jazz they don't come much better.
Herbie, of course, added to the mix with some gutsy trombone on "Nagasaki" (where the women chew tobaccy) and, as is obligatory for brassmen, gravelly vocals - he does it well.
The inscrutable Derek on clarinet added a Bach-like flavour to "Jeepers" and managed to retain his inscrutability during "I Want To Be Happy" - Marshall would be proud of him.
"A Slow Boat To China" - always a favourite of mine - had a nice bass solo by Alan Rudd.
Just a few of the delights, not forgetting Herbie's harmonica solos and some really great barrelhouse piano from Malcolm Armstrong. Malcolm played at the very top of his game today and probably drew the most audience applause after Olive.
A newcomer (to me), Ian Hetherington on drums, really kicked the band along. Playing in the tradition of Lennie Hastings his solos, breaks and general punchiness were ace high.
Without doubt, the best jazz gig in South Shields.
Lance.
PS: Herbie tells me that Wednesday's gig at the Lambton Arms, Eighton Banks, was a success and will run on a weekly basis.

HAPPY BIRTHDAY GEORGE!

George Shearing is 90 today. Happy birthday.
Thank you LondonJazz for drawing this event to my attention. I'll never forget that 'certain night' hearing George and Mel Tormé along with Carmen McRae at the Festival Hall back in the 1980s.
In the 1960s I heard him at Finsbury Park Empire with ex-Basie singer Joe Williams.
Some of the first records I ever bought were by the Shearing Quintet.
As Dave Brubeck is still going at the age of 88 it would seem that, in the jazz world, popularity breeds longevity.
Lance.

Tessa Smith - check her out.

It was Russell who drew my attention to an article in The Journal on a young singer/pianist from the Northumbrian village of Riding Mill.
23 year old Tessa Smith, a former pupil of Hexham's Queen Elizabeth High School, first studied piano with the late Kenny Morrell, himself a local jazz legend, before graduating from Leeds College of Music. Tessa has just recorded a CD - "Bookmark" by the Tessa Smith Quartet. Curious to find out more, I followed various links to her myspace site where there are four excellent tracks to listen to and get an idea of where Tessa's at. It's worth the trip.
In particular, I liked "Tess's Torch Song" - an update of the old Arlen tune. It's the one that begins, 'I had a man, he was a good man. I had a friend, she was a good friend etc.'
Currently Tessa is playing a monthly residency at Harvey Nichols' store in Leeds.
A store, they tell me, that epitimises quality.

Lance.

PS: 'Bookmark' Tessa's site.

Wednesday, August 12, 2009

A Schmazz Night to Remember @ The Cluny - The Patrick Kunka Quartet.

Leah Gough-Cooper (alt/sop), Alan Benzie (kbd), Dylan Coleman (bs), Patrick Kunka (dms).
There have been many memorable nights at The Cluny and it has to be said that this last night was one of them - and for all the right reasons. Given that the four musicians are Boston based students of the Berklee College of Music or the New England Conservatory - the former being possibly the most prestigious jazz based music college in the world - it was inconceivable that they would be anything other than brilliant.
They were quadruple-brilliant at least!
Playing originals, mainly, but not all, from the pen of Kunka, plus a fine exploration of Coltrane's "Equinox", they delivered a powerful performance that bears comparision with anything that I've seen/heard at the Cluny. It was compelling stuff that rolled from the stage and totally engulfed the large audience in sheets of sound.
Leah Gough-Cooper, the name may conjure up an image of a viola player in a twee string quartet but the reality is completely different, the lady is simply one of the best alto players around anywhere. She delivered the goods lock, stock and two smoking barrel's firing phenomenal runs that took my breath away. A native of Scotland, we can thank our lucky stars she opted for sax instead of the bagpipes - imagine!
On piano, another Scot, Alan Benzie, also gave a virtuoso performance. His percussive style kept the tension at an all-time high as the Yamaha CP Series keyboard manfully withstood the beating - this guy can play. His solos challenged Leah's with their seemingly limitless flow of creativity.
Massachusetts own Dylan Coleman underpinned the procedings effectively as well as having meaningful solos. No mere walkman, Dylan's basslines were interwoven into Alan Benzie's solos with both sympathy and contrast. They were an outstanding duo as well as being an integral part of the unit.
This just leaves the leader - Patrick Kunka.
Patrick impressed, not just with his technical prowess; as funky or as swinging as the moment demanded, but also his arrangements and compositions. They were creative and imaginative whilst his drumming gave the band the lift it needed to sustain the high level of mindblowing solo bursts. His solos, never mere flashy displays, but forceful efforts that pushed the tension to almost unbearable heights. The adrenalin pump was at double max tonight.
For an encore, "What is This Thing Called Love?" proved the band's adaptability. Dave Weisser, sitting across from me, compared Leah's playing to that of Kenny Garrett and I don't think he was far wrong. This was a night to remember alright - one helluva night!
Lance.

Alan Glen Trio & Take It To The Bridge @ The Chillingham.

Alan Glen (pno), John Pope (bs), David Carnegie (dms).
-----
Dave Weisser (tpt/vcl), Lance Liddle (tenorish), Barry Ashcroft (pno), Jim Crinson (bs), Eric Stutt (dms). + Simon Crance (fl), James (?) (gtr), Solly Bashiri (dms), Rob Brockwell (pno), Harley Johnson (pno), Peggy (?) (vcl).
Another monthly gem from the Alan Glen Trio. Opening up with "Nightshade", referred to as 'a composition by the pianist in the band', it was a moody opus that gently insinuated itself helped along by a groove rhythm not normally associated with Alan - it worked.
More standard fare was served in the form of, among others, "It Could Happen To You", "That Old Feeling", "Stella By Starlight" and "Four" culminating with "Autumn Leaves" - the big finale and the powerhouse David Carnegie drum solo. On bass, John Pope is slotting in well whilst Alan, as ever, was quietly awesome.
The opening set had Dave singing "I'll Never Be The Same" as well as instrumental takes on "Beautiful Love", "Blue Bossa" and "Moanin'". Jim, Eric and Barry kept things cooking in the engine room and I waved my tenor at the mic throughout the set.
The jam session had Simon Crance, up from Devon, on flute. He blew well on "Morning" & "Killer Joe". Rob Brockwell played some brilliant piano as did Harley on "Blue Monk". James sat in on guitar to great effect likewise Solly on drums. The evening finished with a return visit from Peggy (see photo) who had "Georgia on her Mind" - complete with the seldom heard verse.
Lance.

Newport R.I. 2009 on npr.

The complete Newport Jazz Festival of 2009 has been captured online by npr Click here to listen/download sets by Dave Brubeck/ Branford Marsalis/Cedar Walton/Jim Carter and many more. There's some grand stuff just begging to be heard.
Lance.

Monday, August 10, 2009

Fancy Footwork at the Corner House

Barry Soulsby (clt/alt/vcl), Brian Sibbald (bs), Peter Wright (tpt), Lawrence McBriarty (tmb), Fred Thompson (dms/vcl), Brian Bennett (bjo/vcl).
A packed house saw the Vieux Carré Jazzmen turn in their usual spirited performance on some good old good ones such as "That's A Plenty", "Jazz Me Blues", "Royal Garden Blues", "Margie" and "If I Had You" with vocals by Fred and a rare rendition of a tune new to me, "You Broke Your Promise" this was sung by Brian Bennett who played the banjo at the same time defying all the laws of gravity.
Barry Soulsby was seen studying a copy of "The Carnival of Venice" indicating that the world premiere of this venerable opus may be drawing closer.
The band in full swing generate an infectious rhythm that tonight inspired some fancy stepping from a gentleman at the bar.
Lance.

Sunday, August 09, 2009

Ruth Lambert CD Album Lauch announced

The new Ruth Lambert CD has been eagerly awaited by her many fans and we're pleased to announce that it's release on the Jazz Action label is now imminent. The official launch is said to be Oct 23 at Saville Exchange, North Shields. For a taster visit Ruth's MySpace site and listen to "Love That Never Dies", "Easy Street", Beautiful Love" or "Never Will I Marry". Each one a gem. Lance.
-----
On the same label Mark William's "Balaclava Street" is due out early August which means it may be out even as we speak.

Claude Werner Quartet shines through the rain in St Anne’s Sq

It’s the Manchester Jazz Festival, its St Anne’s Square and it’s open to the elements. The heavy rain punctuated with short sharp bursts of strong sunlight kept the audience busy with umbrellas, drying seats and repeatedly scurrying for cover. This didn’t phase The Claude Werner Quartet however and it was clear that it would take a great deal more audience distraction to shake these accomplished players out of their collective groove. A real international band this that Claude Werner (tenor sax) has put together ranging from his own roots in Chile through Barbados (David Carnegie on drums), Northern Ireland (Mark Williams on guitar) to the north-west with Laurence Blackadder on bass. For me their music reflects the international mix within the band as each member’s influences were evident throughout the cleverly constructed Werner compositions. Its hard to pick out a favourite from the 7 number set but the opener ‘City’, the closing ‘Things I cannot express’ and if for nothing else other than its appropriateness on the day ‘Sitting in the sun’ stood out. The most striking thing about this band is how such strong individuals, and they all had the space to make their own statements, could create such an effortless sound which was relaxing yet challenging at the same time. Claude Werner on tenor sax has a strong, clear tone and with more than a hint of Charles Lloyd in his technique. Extremely melodic but at times stepping way out of the box, such as on the finale ‘Things I cannot express’, but always with a distinct purpose. A consummate band leader and, on this showing, also a composer to be reckoned with. Mark Williams on guitar augmented each number with his sharp and precise, but seemingly effortless solos. David Carnegie was energetically confident on drums and together with the bass provided a driving purpose to this strong assured music. Laurence Blackadder on bass provided a steady, pulsating support that underpinned the whole performance and allowed his fellow band members the perfect canvas on which to sketch their solos. The Claude Werner Quartet can be heard on CD with ‘Thoughts and Recollections’ available from www.claudewerner.com David Gosling

Saturday, August 08, 2009

Bird Lives in Hood Street (Newcastle)

Browsing through the music & film section of the Oxfam shop on Hood Street, Newcastle I noticed they had "Bird Lives" by Ross Russell.
As I already have a copy of this book which, incidentally, is an invaluable tome for jazz ornithologists I didn't bother checking the price but for those without a copy it may be worth popping in or giving them a ring.
I know there has been a lot of flack aimed at Oxfam from second hand book dealers - whether you agree or disagree is not relevant here - I'm merely pinpointing the whereabouts of a book that should be on everyone's bookshelf and is probably not on sale anywhere else in the locality.
Lance.

Friday, August 07, 2009

Release Mike Westbrook

Dusting off some vinyl the other day (wife says "You? dusting?) I pulled out Mike Westbrook's "Release". What memories this brought back! For me, this was a doorway into the freer forms of jazz without total disregard to the past. A Mingus like theme, yet with a sort of patriotic Brit. feel about it, the soloists were about as avante garde as I'd listened to at that time - 1968. John Surman, I was convinced, was the world's greatest baritone player and maybe I still am. Mike Osborne, Malcolm Griffiths and Paul Henderson all soloed frenetically yet with meaning. That they were able to incorporate "Flying Home" and "Opus One" into it spoke much about the arranging skills of Westbrook.
In his Jazz Journal review, Steve Voce said, "...Flying Home, for instance, is played with an intensity that makes the Hampton versions sound like teatime with Donald Peers."
Many an afternoon's pubbing with Bill Shaw and Charlie Carmichael was followed by listening to this gem back at my place.
Happy days.
Lance.

Thursday, August 06, 2009

Everything's Rosy at Rosie's (Malone's)

Herbie Hudson (tmb/hca/vcl), Barry Soulsby (clt/vcl), Malcolm Armstrong (pno), Alan Rudd (bs), Ollie Rillands (dms).
Although there was no Olive this week and Barry Soulsby depped for Derek Fleck (and Olive?) it was still business as usual as the Maine Streeters played their usual brand of trumpetless Chicago style jazz. to a decent sized crowd. It is rare to see any of the jazz fraternity in Rosies but, nevertheless, they seem to enjoy it in a noisy sort of way.
I recall a story of the River City, back in the days of Joe Shenton, castigating an audience that was listening so intently you could have heard a beat drop. Joe addressed the audience and said, "For Gawd's sake make some noise we're getting nervous!"
In the absence of a trumpet, Herbie soloed on both trombone and harmonica as well as doing the vocal on "Do You Know What It Means To Miss New Orleans?" whilst still leaving room for Barry to grab some and Malcolm, the keyboard mercifully hiding his shorts-clad legs from the ladies present, to play some authentic sounding backing.
A pleasant afternoon.
Lance.
Note: The band starts an additional new venue next Wednesday lunchtime at the Lambton Arms, Eighton Banks, Gateshead 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm.

San Sebastian 1972

A short YouTube clip of The Tyne River Jazzmen which was a splinter group of the Newcastle Big Band. San Sebastian Jazz Festival 1972. Thank you to Gordon Solomon, Andy Hudson, Angie Pearce for bringing this clip to our attention. Lance (who was probably in a bar with Charlie Carmichael at the time. The phrase 'Dos cuba libre' springs to mind. I discovered they were the only words you needed to know!)

Nick Pride and the Pimptones with Laurie Shepherd @ Ashington Jazz Club.

Two shows for the price of one! The first saw Nick kick off with a couple of guitar solos to set the mood. Laurie Shepherd joined him for the rest of the set - first number? my request for "This Masquerade", as featured on her myspace site. Laurie made comment that it was nice to have an audience that listened as a lot of the work they do as a duo is for background music at functions etc. The second set with the full band was a real first for the Club. The membership all enjoyed an introduction to Nicks style of jazz with his original compositions. Laurie joined the band for a couple of numbers towards the end.
It's always a two way thing and afterwards the band members all said they had had a great night and had felt at home in the club. As some of our membership was on holiday I co-erced family and friends to attend. An old mate of mine, Alfie York (who I worked with at the NCB in teenage years), turned up. He was the guy I used to go to the New Orleans Club with. Alf thought the world of the legendary Clive Grey's banjo playing - so much so he bought a banjo and went for lessons! This was Alf's first visit to the club for over 20 years and I think he was converted by the band. He is no longer a banjoholic!
John Taylor.

Wednesday, August 05, 2009

Hey Jude - Come Back Soon - Likewise Alan Davis.

Alan Davis (clt), Judith Murphy (fl/vcl), Dave Weisser (tpt/vcl), Darren Grainger (ten), Barry Ashcroft (pno), Jim Crinson (bs), Eric Stutt (dms). + Herbie Hudson (hca/vcl), Harley Johnson (pno), Chris Finch (pno), Debra Milne (vcl), Lance Liddle (ten).
This was one of those nights when it felt good to be alive and at the Chilli for the weekly get together of Take It to The Bridge - there were just so many things happening.
From Manchester, England, came Alan Davis - a teacher at Chethams - he blew some fine Goodmanish clarinet on "They Can't Take That Away From Me", "Summertime" (Chris on piano), "Autumn Leaves" (Debra on vocal), and a couple of others.
Herbie Hudson just happened to have a Hohner Chromatic in his pocket and he gave "Don't Get A Round Much Anymore" a workout both vocally and instrumentally. Nice one Herbie. Dave also exercised his chops on this one.
Harley finished the night off with "Moose the Moose". His Monkian tendencies well in the ascendancy and, if he'd been at the wheel of a car instead of a Roland keyboard he'd have been done for speeding.
Darren impressed on "Lester Left Town" and "It's Time" whilst Lance Liddle wandered in and out of "Now's The Time".
Anything else? Oh yes - very much oh yes!
Dave's partner Judith played flute and sang. On flute she did Clare Fischer's "Morning" - quite brilliantly. Whilst, on "Lullaby of Birdland" she joined Dave and Alan soloing on flute and taking the vocal bridge of Dave's beginning and ending. Alan having a good blast on this one too. Jude also sang on "Summertime" and almost got to play piano on the same tune (Chris did the honours - Barry having set off on the subterranean safari required to buy a pint.) This woman shouldn't be chained to a kitchen sink (I'm assured she isn't!) she should be up there with Ruth and Zoe. Her version of "I'm Shadowing You" à la Carol Kidd bore comparison with the original whilst "Like Someone In Love" was simply terrific.
This was one of those nights where 'the sound of surprise', as Whitney Balliott and others have put it, certainly was surprising and in the most pleasantest of ways.
It goes without saying that Eric, Jim and Barry were also on the money. Talking about money - all this for a quid? they should have been queueing the length of Chilli Road!
Come back soon folks.
Next week the Alan Glen Trio.
Lance.

Twittering

Came across the following Tweets from Melody Gardot: "Watched the sun rise over the edge of an ottoman, crushed leather beneath my fingertips. a cool breeze kissed me and Nice rose with engines." 11:39 PM Jul 22nd from web "Love is the thing that fills the air when your spirit is weightless and the sun seems to come from inside you instead of from above you." 8:50 AM Jul 20th from web "Happy to have seen ghent - i love you all! what a fun night. And to Mark hahaha thanks for stopping me ;)" 8:07 AM Jul 20th from web "Why can't everybody be like Guy Barker?" 4:49 PM Jul 15th from web. Lance.

Tuesday, August 04, 2009

Extreme Measures @ The Cluny - a worthy band for a worthy cause

Gary Turner (ten), Mark Williams (gtr), Ben Gilbert (pno), Stuart Davies(bs), David Carnegie (dms).
What is there left to say about Extreme Measures that Russell didn't say after the Stockton gig at the weekend or that I haven't already said myself over the past couple of years?
Tonight was a special gig on two counts. Firstly it was in aid of the 'Maggie's Day' Cancer charity and charity doesn't come much higher than that. The organisers must have been pleased with the good response.
Secondly, it was Ben Gilbert's last gig with the band. Ben will be a tremendous miss but who knows that his replacement will not add a new dimension? It will be interesting to find out.
There were some awesome moments tonight from all of the soloists and to pick an individual out would surely be impossible.
Sartorially though it's a different matter. David's cool haircut wins by a country mile!
Lance.

Prom 22: MGM Musicals at the Albert Hall.

Although I guess it isn't strictly Jazz, I watched this program on Saturday night & it is such a good crit from Clive Davis that I thought it might be of interest. Times Review. Liz.

Monday, August 03, 2009

Vieux Carré Jazzmen @ The Corner House

Peter Wright (tpt), Barry Soulsby (clt/alt/vcl), Lawrence McBriarty (tmb), Terry Harvey (bjo/gtr), Brian Sibbald (bs), Fred Thompson (dms/vcl).
Part of me was still at the funeral when the VC 'boys' kicked off with "Please Don't Talk About Me When I'm Gone" - somehow it seemed appropriate.
Brian Bennett was on holiday so Terry Harvey was in the banjo/guitar chair chording nicely on the latter instrument for "I'm Confessin' ". It was a routine sort of session with no real highs but, then again, no lows. In between tunes, Barry's impromptu burst on, I think, "Carnival of Venice" was worthy of a full blown feature.
Lance.

Musicians Turn Out In Force To Pay Their Respects to Marshall

Pleased to see so many familiar faces at the Crem. for Marshall Walker's funeral. I'll say this for the jazz world, they are united when it comes to saying goodbye to their own.
Tubby Hayes' "There Will Never Be Another You" played the mourners in and Sting's "Every Breath You Take" played them out
Afterwards at the Ravensworth Arms there was also a good turnout and I only regret that circumstances decreed I couldn't stay long enough to exchange reminiscences with those present.
RIP.
Lance.

Sunday, August 02, 2009

Stockton Jazz Festival Part two - 4:00 pm till closing time.

The mid - afternoon departure of Bebop Spoken Here's Main Man meant someone had to pick up the quill and act as scribe.
Quill dipped, poised and next on the bandstand...Spelk (thanks Lance!). Where to begin? ''Fantastic'' just about sums up this trio. A bit more? Well, three virtuosi playing the most glorious stuff! Improvised yet structured, loud, very loud, embracing straightahead jazz, jazz funk, anarcho - punk, death metal and more. Drummer Adrian Tilbrook generates immense power, Rickenbacker bassist Andy Champion lays down killer riffs and guitar wizard Chris Sharkey produces a bewildering array of sounds via a king - size pedal board. The Georgian Theatre audience loved them. These boys are busy with other projects, Spelk is a rare happening, so, next time, be there. Nick Pride and the Pimptones provided a marked contrast to Spelk - musically and sartorially. Nick Pride is an accomplished jazz guitarist having worked as accompaniest to many of the region's finest singers. The Pimptones have a love of soul music and with their jazz chops they deliver a set of largely uptempo tunes with band leader Pride taking several vocals amidst well - crafted solos from all; Alex Leathard (trombone & vocals), Graham Hardy (trumpet & flugelhorn), John Wheeler (tenor), Ian Paterson (electric bass & vocals) and Oz Cassidy (drums). For the band's penultimate number, the sharp-suited Pride invited the very elegant Zoe Gilby to return to the stand for one number. Two thirds of Spelk (Champion & Tilbrook) returned to the stage as one quarter of John Warren's Splinter Group ( for the innumerate reader = 8 musicians). ''Splinter Group'' was the first one from the pad with a superb solo from guitarist Mark Williams and it set the standard. The band, with Graham Hardy as MD, is a joy to listen to, from other John Warren compositions such as ''Lopsided'' to a tune penned by pianist Paul Edis - ''For Bill'' (trumpeter Noel Dennis suggesting it was a homage to Bill Oddie!). All had opportunities to solo including trombonist Chris Hibbard and Graeme Wilson on tenor. David Carnegie's Extreme Measures returned to the Fringe Festival for a second year and did the impossible - perform an even better set than they did last year! The quintet made one enforced change - with Jamie McCredie absent, Mark Williams stepped into the breach. The guitarist had a busy afternoon (Zoe Gilby Quintet, Splinter Group) yet was on the money from the off. A contemporary jazz outfit exploring modal shifts, this is a band of the highest calibre. Drummer Carnegie is a master musician. A ready smile, one of contentment, is reciprocated from electric bassist Stuart Davies, the same from pianist Ben Gilbert. The frontline fireworks cascaded over the venue; Gary Turner's slow - burning, then scorching tenor saxophone matched by the fizzing fretwork of Williams. Most of the tunes heard here in Stockton were being given a first airing, some of which will be available on the band's second CD due to be recorded later this year. Upon its release do one thing - buy it! So, to the finale. The Funk Regulators are Teesside's pride and joy. Young Turks blazing a trail of super - charged big soul band classics. All fourteen of them (I think there were 14, the stage was crowded, the place was jumpin') were stars on the night - each and every one of them. A larger than life teenage two - tone rude boy screaming soul numbers with his chanteuse vocalist partner backed by a tight, cookin' band of talented musicians. Tower of Power covers (including ''What Is Hip?), Stevie Wonder's ''I Wish'' and Cream's ''Sunshine of Your Love'' (yes, it worked!) were just some of the tunes rattled - off with aplomb. It was solos all round (screamers from alto and tenor), each one met with thunderous applause from a packed house. Check 'em out www.thefunkregulators.co.uk A great a day out at the Georgian. Thanks go to MC Noel Dennis, Adrian Tilbrook (of Jazz Action) and the staff at the Georgian Theatre. I can't wait for next year. Adrian Tilbrook's photos are currently out in cyberspace but have been spotted passing over Ryhope so they shouldn't be too long. They're here! (at the end of the album.) Russell

Blog Archive

Posting a Comment

Posting a comment.

1) Click on comments (at the foot of the posting.).

2) In the window that appears Click on...O Name/URL.

3) Type your name in the box (URL is optional).

4) Click on PUBLISH YOUR COMMENT.

5) Type the jumbled word verification if asked.

-----

Alternatively, email me - lanceliddle@gmail.com.

About this blog - contact details.

Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
PS:I don't care what your political views are - you can love or hate Cameron, Clegg, Milliband, Farage, Genghis Khan or Julius Caesar - just don't air them here!
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

Subscribe!